Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.1 article “Mechanisms and Mediators of the Skeletal Muscle Repeated Bout Effect” from author Rob Hyldahl. Skeletal muscle adapts to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating several but still poorly understood mechanisms that endow protection from subsequent damage. Known widely as the repeated bout effect, we propose that neural adaptations, alterations to muscle mechanical properties, structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and biochemical signaling work in concert to coordinate the protective adaptation.
The thruster is a compound movement, meaning that it is a multi-joint movement that works several muscle groups. HOW TO DO IT: The thruster begins in the front rack position across your chest. Squat down, keeping your chest big and knees out. Drive out of the bottom of the hole, similar to a front squat, while driving your knees out. Then use the force you are creating in the squat to drive the bar overhead. Then lock out your arms overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.
The searches identified 80 studies, of which 11 met the inclusion criteria. In 5 studies, the diagnosis of RCIS was confirmed using an impingement test consisting of lidocaine injected into the subacromial space and elimination of pain with the impingement sign. Randomization methods were used in 6 studies, and blinded, independent examiners were involved in follow-up data collection in only 3 studies. Validated outcome measures were used in all studies. Follow-up was very good in 10 studies and was less than 90% in only 1 study. The specific exercise programs varied among studies. However, general treatment principles were identified among the different studies and included frequency, ROM, stretching or flexibility, strengthening, manual therapy (joint and/or soft tissue mobilizations), modalities, and others.

CrossFit Games: The sport of fitness has arrived (or so claims Reebok, the official sponsor of the CrossFit Games). Each summer the CrossFit Games test participants with a barrage of physical challenges and workouts, ranging from swimming and running to pull-ups and handstand walks (sorry, Kobayashi, hot-dog eating has yet to make an appearance). Participants accrue points over the events, and the male and female winners are crowned World’s Fittest Man & Woman. Sectional and Regional qualifiers narrow the field before the annual Games Weekend.


Notice in the workouts below that your first set calls for eight reps, your second set 10 reps and your third set 12. This is referred to in bodybuilding circles as a “reverse pyramid” (a standard pyramid goes from higher to lower reps), where you decrease the weight each set to complete the higher rep count. For example, if on your first set of lat pulldowns you used 140 pounds for eight reps, try using 120 or 130 pounds on set two and 100–120 pounds on set three.

In line with Martin and colleagues [29] we found that women more often engaged in walking, swimming and dancing compared to men, while men more often performed jogging, cycling and winter sports. Our data also showed that men performed a higher amount of sessions with domestic activities and combined endurance and resistance training compared to women. The sex differences were the same in both training groups, indicating that disparities in type of exercise between older women and men are independent of the exercise intensity they are instructed to perform.
In healthy adults, aerobic exercise has been shown to induce transient effects on cognition after a single exercise session and persistent effects on cognition following regular exercise over the course of several months.[33][42][45] People who regularly perform aerobic exercise (e.g., running, jogging, brisk walking, swimming, and cycling) have greater scores on neuropsychological function and performance tests that measure certain cognitive functions, such as attentional control, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, working memory updating and capacity, declarative memory, spatial memory, and information processing speed.[33][37][39][41][42][45] The transient effects of exercise on cognition include improvements in most executive functions (e.g., attention, working memory, cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control, problem solving, and decision making) and information processing speed for a period of up to 2 hours after exercising.[45]

In 1904, Danish prize-winning athlete and gymnastics educator JP Müller followed Checkley’s exercise philosophy with the publication of ‘My System’. This book described how the relatively healthy, average person could keep fit, fortify health and stamina, and increase physical and mental efficiency with 15 min of daily exercise. He claimed: ‘If people only knew how much more, how much better and how much longer they can enjoy life, instead of being controlled by a weakly body, they have a strong and healthy one at their command!’15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Müller was born a weak child and developed an exercise routine to re-build his own body, inspired by the harmony of ancient Greek statues. His routine included exercising natural functional movements, self-massage of skin in fascial lines, exposure to the sun, and bathing in cold water in addition to running on the balls of the feet as an aerobic activity.15,16 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904.
In both groups, men had a higher proportion of cycling, cross-country skiing and jogging sessions compared to women (Fig. 4). Men also had a higher proportion of sessions with combined endurance and resistance training and domestic activities than women. In contrast, women had a higher proportion of walking, swimming and dancing sessions than men. There were no sex differences in resistance training and other types of endurance training (Fig. 4).
The novelty of the present study is that of demonstrating the possibility of applying a specific vigorous physical exercise program [17] on healthy elderly adults over 65 years and evaluating its effects on functional capacity using the classical SFT [3]. To administer the high exercise intensity, we used a HR control under continuous accurate visual monitoring by a sport scientist. As expected, after only 12 weeks of training, we found significant enhancements of almost all skills tested. Our results clearly show that our VE program is relevant and has a positive impact on people over 65 in helping them to maintain a high quality of life. The difference from most of the literature [18–22] regards the exercise protocol intensity, which is usually milder than ours. Also, in the aforementioned studies there was a poor attention about the consequences of the exercise program on general quality of life of subjects. They mainly focused on the attenuated risks of falling. On the contrary, the SFTs applied in our study clearly show that our VE program may ameliorate several motor abilities and in turn the general quality of life in healthy elderly adults over 65 years of age. However, two other studies showed that elderly people need to exercise close to their limit of maximum capacity [23, 24] to improve their physical fitness but, unlike the present research, they were conducted on patients who were in deconditioning status linked to their chronic illnesses.
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