Evidence from HIIT studies conducted under controlled laboratory conditions has provided proof-of-concept of efficacy [9]. However, it has been argued that HIIT has high efficacy but low effectiveness [16], and long-term exercise interventions carried out under free-living conditions have been asked for to investigate whether HIIT is feasible as a public health initiative among older adults [9, 16]. Our data showed that both training groups reported on average more than two exercise sessions per week throughout the year. Approximately 60% of the sessions in the HIIT group were performed with a self-reported high-intensity (≥15 Borg scale), indicating that older adults are able to perform HIIT over a long time-period without strict supervision. However, women had a lower proportion of sessions with high-intensity exercise compared to men. This result is in line with previous findings that women (aged 60–67 years) are less likely than men to prefer vigorous physical activity [23].
^ Jump up to: a b c Paillard T, Rolland Y, de Souto Barreto P (July 2015). "Protective Effects of Physical Exercise in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Narrative Review". J Clin Neurol. 11 (3): 212–219. doi:10.3988/jcn.2015.11.3.212. PMC 4507374. PMID 26174783. Aerobic physical exercise (PE) activates the release of neurotrophic factors and promotes angiogenesis, thereby facilitating neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, which in turn improve memory and cognitive functions. ... Exercise limits the alteration in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and contributes to optimal functioning of the basal ganglia involved in motor commands and control by adaptive mechanisms involving dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission.

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Neuromuscular function tests were performed pre and post-exercise to quantify muscle fatigue. As previous studies documented the extent of isometric muscle fatigue induced by OLDE [8, 11, 17, 18], we chose to focus only on isokinetic muscle fatigue. Therefore, knee extensors (KE) MVCs were performed at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s pre (after the warm-up) and post-exercise (13 ± 4s after exhaustion). Subjects were asked to perform two maximal isokinetic knee extensions at each angular velocity (starting position corresponded to knee angle at 90 deg; range of motion was the same as the OLDE). The highest peak torque value of the two trials was considered, and a 20 s recovery was set between each set of KE MVCs. The order of contractions was randomized between sessions as follow (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s) and identical for testing pre and post-exercise of the same session. This randomization allows obtaining a time course of KE MVC torque recovery following the time to exhaustion test at each angular velocity was obtained at a different time point at each session: either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). An overview of timing can be found in Fig 1. Twenty seconds after completion of the last KE MVC, a maximal isometric MVC of the knee flexors was performed (isometric KF MVC). Visual feedback of the torque and strong verbal encouragement were provided for each MVC [please see reference 9 for more details].

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The good-morning is a weight training exercise in which a barbell, two dumbbells, or no weight at all is held on the shoulders, behind the head. The person bends forward and bows at the hips and recovers to upright. The good-morning is so called because the movement resembles bowing to greet someone. It involves the hamstrings but is primarily used to strengthen the lower back; the degree of knee bend used will change the focus – nearly straight-legged involving the hamstrings most.

Aerobic exercise also helps relax blood vessel walls, lower blood pressure, burn body fat, lower blood sugar levels, reduce inflammation, boost mood, and raise "good" HDL cholesterol. Combined with weight loss, it can lower "bad" LDL cholesterol levels, too. Over the long term, aerobic exercise reduces your risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, breast and colon cancer, depression, and falls.
My favorites are all free, though you can subscribe for more features to most of them as well. But free works just fine. They’re all available on iOS and Android (except for one). They’re all built around the science-based concept of high-intensity circuit training using body weight, so you don’t need any fancy equipment. I’ve done these in hotel rooms, my office, parks, and even in a quiet corner at the airport waiting to get on a plane.
If you ask most busy people why they don’t exercise, by far the most common reason is that that they “don’t have time.” The effort of putting on workout clothes, going to the gym and showering is simply too onerous to fit in. Even the idea of a boring home workout or a 30-minute exercise tape can feel like too much of a commitment when we’re late for work or for a date.

One hundred and sixty-seven subjects (77 males and 90 females), aged 18–50 years, performed a modified Bruce protocol before (pre) and after (post) a weight loss program of 24 weeks. This program combined physical training (strength, S; endurance, E; combined strength + endurance, SE; or physical activity recommendation, PA) 3 times per week, with a 25%–30% caloric restriction diet.


We've said it before, but HIIT really does the job when you want to trim ab fat: A study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that people who did two HIIT and two strength sessions a week lost more visceral fat (11 percent of the dangerous kind around your organs)—about an extra inch from their waist—than those who ran twice and did two strength sessions. Plus, many of those speedy intervals, such as sprints, are total-body moves that engage your abs big time. Do speed bursts on a cardio machine or try three-minute boxing rounds (another transverse tightener) with a minute of active recovery in between. This unique HIIT workout incorporates some boxing moves and some weight training for double the benefits. (Don't get along with HIIT training? Studies show adding music will make it more enjoyable.)
Remember when the only thing your cell phone did was make phone calls? Now, you can waste all kinds of time with smartphone apps that allow you to do everything from playing Scrabble to exercising. Smartphones, iPads and MP3 players are excellent resources for home exercisers, particularly if you find yourself getting bored from doing the same old thing, day after day. With the right apps, you can find guided workouts, paced music, timers and more, all of which can add variety and fun to your home workouts.
Now that the holidays are creeping around the corner, you may have to break up with your regularly scheduled sweat sessions, at least temporarily. And though the most wonderful time of the year may interfere with your fave spin class or butt-kicking bootcamp routine, it’s completely possible to stay fit—all you need is an Internet connection and a little living room space. (OK, and maybe a few props here and there.) And it’s all thanks to these seriously excellent, totally free workout videos. We’ve rounded up the best YouTube workouts—we’re talking everything from traditional aerobics to ballet to high-intensity interval training routines—so you can keep your physique in tip-top shape this season and beyond.
Why do we exercise? We all know it's good for our health, but have you ever thought about it?  Do you exercise the way you do because you've heard that's the way it should be done? Is it possible that the current way of working out could be good for some parts of our body, but bad for others... are we doing more harm than good? Are we spending more time exercising than we need to?
PiYo isn't like standard Pilates and yoga classes that make you hold long, intense poses, or lead you through dozens of repetitive, microscopic core movements. PiYo speeds everything up—including your results—by introducing you to dynamic, flowing sequences that can burn serious calories at the same time as they lengthen and tone your muscles and increase your flexibility.
Matt Sauerhoff, owner of The LIV Method says one of his favorite, fastest and easiest to do on the go moves is the wall squat. “Start with your back against the wall and your heels about a foot off the wall. Bend your knees and slide down the wall until your legs create a 90-degree angle,” he says. “Make sure your knees are aligned over your toes/laces. Press heels into the floor and focus on contracting your abs, pressing lower back into the wall so it’s flat. Hold for 30 seconds.” Combine it with these 30 Fat-Burning Foods and you’ll be melting the fat in no time!
You’re also extremely adaptable, so it’s a great time to explore, play, and learn new physical skills. “Younger people can handle new elements in their workouts every few weeks,” says Anderson, who trains teen athletes as well as octogenarians. Strong bones and muscles, fewer injuries, quick recovery, and naturally high levels of anabolic hormones allow you to make faster progress than at any other point in your life.
... The test was conducted at a self-chosen cadence between 55 and 95 revolutions per minute with an initial 5-minute warm up at 40 W followed by increments of 10 W/min (women) or 15 W/min (men) until voluntary exhaustion. Based on the expected maximal power output determined based on age, gender, disability, and body size, individual power output adjustments were made immediately after the 5-minute warm up in order to exhaust the subjects within 8 to 12 min after warm up [22]. Expired gas was collected in a mixing bag. ...
The positive trend shown here is an encouraging result in this population in relation to the possibility of increasing their ability in performing daily activities, reducing the occurrence of falls and potential femoral fractures. Further research is needed to understand how to design a vigorous exercise protocol, which may focus not only on aerobics but also on the different skills assessed by the SFT and which may include specific training sessions to enhance those particular skills, such as 8-foot up and go test. To maximize the functional/physical capacities of those over 65, a close link between high-intensity exercise and functional exercises is required. A mixed circuit training program including both kinds of the aforementioned exercises and measurable by SFT should be followed.
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