The main strength of this study is the large data material on exercise patterns. Most research on exercise pattern has used a cross-sectional design whereas we followed older adults over a one-year period and collected data from each exercise session they performed. Furthermore, this is the first study to assess differences in exercise patterns between older adults instructed to follow MCT versus HIIT.
3.  Move v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y but smoothly. "Explosive" movement is not only nonproductive, but also dangerous. Plus, moving slowly eliminates momentum, which ensures constant muscle loading. Make a movement last about ten seconds. (A chin-up should take about ten seconds from the lowest to the highest point, and then another ten seconds from the highest to the lowest point. Same goes for a push-up.) There is nothing to be gained from fast movements. Moving slowly prevents injury. (There are over 30 million exercise related injuries annually in this country; most of these can no doubt be attributed to high-force movement.) Keep your movements low-force and high-intensity. An analogy: If you attempt to lift your car quickly, you will likely injure yourself even if using proper form. If you try lifting it slowly and intensely, your chances of injury are nil. Think of how you drive your car over speed bumps... fast will cause damage to the car's suspension, slow will not.
Circuit training is a fun way to focus on strength and aerobic exercise and is great especially if you love some variety and a faster pace of working out. It’s worth noting that circuit training doesn’t offer the same level of conditioning as strength and aerobic exercise does on their own. Specifically, if your fitness goal is to be strong, circuit training is not the best way to reach that goal. You can do circuit training in groups or classes as well as alone. This article offers an easy way of creating your own circuit routines.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
The beneficial effect of exercise on the cardiovascular system is well documented. There is a direct correlation between physical inactivity and cardiovascular mortality, and physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. Low levels of physical exercise increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases mortality.[22]

I enjoyed your functional training exercises, but I’m not sure about some of them as I was recently diagnosed with a small tear in my rotator cuff. I’m not planning on having surgery. My doctor said that I could work out, but other than saying not to do straight bar bench presses, he said if it hurts, don’t do it. I would love a little more direction than that. Do you have anything more to offer? Thank you.

My favorites are all free, though you can subscribe for more features to most of them as well. But free works just fine. They’re all available on iOS and Android (except for one). They’re all built around the science-based concept of high-intensity circuit training using body weight, so you don’t need any fancy equipment. I’ve done these in hotel rooms, my office, parks, and even in a quiet corner at the airport waiting to get on a plane.
Fortunately, recent scientific studies have shown that Ubiquinol CoQ10 and PQQ supplementation will protect the mitochondria and reduce high levels of oxidative stress. With less mitochondrial fatigue, tolerable exercise can be had by the CFS/ME person.  Please also check the supplement page as I also use PQQ for oxidative stress along with Ubiquinol. 
Besides toning the muscles, Pilates is known for boosting endurance. A wall and small hand-weights are the only necessities for this highly effective exercise. Stand with your back against the wall and feet hip-width apart. Walk the feet out a little, bend the knees, and slide down as if sitting in a chair. Progress in intensity each day until you can get your upper legs parallel to the floor. Raise the arms to shoulder height and hold for 30 seconds. Do two reps.
Circuit training is a fun way to focus on strength and aerobic exercise and is great especially if you love some variety and a faster pace of working out. It’s worth noting that circuit training doesn’t offer the same level of conditioning as strength and aerobic exercise does on their own. Specifically, if your fitness goal is to be strong, circuit training is not the best way to reach that goal. You can do circuit training in groups or classes as well as alone. This article offers an easy way of creating your own circuit routines.
Around 1900, Tasmanian-born Australian professional reciter and theatrical producer Frederick Alexander developed a novel methodology to harmonize full-body functional movements. As a child, Alexander suffered respiratory ailments, leading to the initial purpose of developing the method – to normalize his personal voice function in order to materialize a stage performance dream. In 1902, Alexander established the Sydney Dramatic and Operatic Conservatorium and in 1904, moved to London to spread his teaching method. During the first years, Alexander focused on teaching ‘full chest breathing’ techniques mainly to stage artists and people with breathing pathologies.19 Staring J. Frederick Matthias Alexander 1869-1955. The Origins and History of the Alexander Technique. A medical historical analysis of F.M. Alexander’s life, work, technique, and writings. Nijmegen: Radboud Universiteit; 2005. [Google Scholar] However, he soon discovered that retrieving the natural ‘conscious control’ via mindful postures and movements resulted in benefits not only for the vocal health and performance but also the health and performance of the whole body and mind.20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar] This holistic evolvement transformed the newly formed ‘Alexander Technique’ into a general remedy and preventative tool suitable for all populations. Alexander explained in his 1910 book ‘Man’s Supreme Inheritance:’20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar]

One of the rotator cuff strengthening exercises proposed by Kuhn is scaption performed with the thumb down or up. Clinically, this exercise is called the empty-can (thumb-down) or full-can (thumb-up) exercise. When prescribing this strengthening exercise, one should consider the effect that upper extremity position has on the tissues located in the subacromial space. Yanai et al4 showed that impingement forces on the rotator cuff tendons under the coracoacromial ligament were greater with the empty-can exercise than with the full-can exercise. Therefore, the full-can exercise is more appropriate for this patient population.

To shake up your strength workout, replace the everyone-does-'em moves (crunches, etc.) with this fresh routine created by Dixon. Do this series two to three times per week, alternating with cardio days; you'll start to see results in as little as two to three weeks. Each move hits the same major muscle groups as the old standbys, but challenges them more, giving you a stronger, sleeker body in the same amount of time. So it's efficient—in the best way possible.
Torque signal and knee angle signal were recorded using the same dynamometer as for the OLDE (Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer, CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). During the tests a two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Torque signal and knee angle signal were digitized on-line at a sampling frequency of 1 kHz using a computer, and stored for analysis with commercially available software. Torque signal was filtered prior to data analysis (Butterworth low-pass filter at 100 Hz). Torque signal, knee angle signal and EMG signal were recorded with the same device (MP150, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA) and analyzed with the same commercially available software (Acqknowledge 4.2 for MP Systems, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA).
The Stiff-Legged Deadlift is a deadlift variation that specifically targets the posterior chain. Little to no knee movement occurs in this exercise to ensure hamstring, glute, and spinal erector activation. The bar starts on the floor and the individual sets up like a normal deadlift but the knees are at a 160° angle instead on 135° on the conventional deadlift.
Around 1900, Tasmanian-born Australian professional reciter and theatrical producer Frederick Alexander developed a novel methodology to harmonize full-body functional movements. As a child, Alexander suffered respiratory ailments, leading to the initial purpose of developing the method – to normalize his personal voice function in order to materialize a stage performance dream. In 1902, Alexander established the Sydney Dramatic and Operatic Conservatorium and in 1904, moved to London to spread his teaching method. During the first years, Alexander focused on teaching ‘full chest breathing’ techniques mainly to stage artists and people with breathing pathologies.19 Staring J. Frederick Matthias Alexander 1869-1955. The Origins and History of the Alexander Technique. A medical historical analysis of F.M. Alexander’s life, work, technique, and writings. Nijmegen: Radboud Universiteit; 2005. [Google Scholar] However, he soon discovered that retrieving the natural ‘conscious control’ via mindful postures and movements resulted in benefits not only for the vocal health and performance but also the health and performance of the whole body and mind.20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar] This holistic evolvement transformed the newly formed ‘Alexander Technique’ into a general remedy and preventative tool suitable for all populations. Alexander explained in his 1910 book ‘Man’s Supreme Inheritance:’20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar]
Sensitivity of ACTH and PRL for the detection of OTS was four out of four and five out of five, respectively (table 2; cutoff, 200% at the second exercise test) and for the detection of NFO was four out of five and three out of three, respectively. Sensitivity of cortisol (cutoff, 200% at the second test) and GH (cutoff, 1000%) for the detection of OTS was four out of five and two out of five, and for the detection of NFO, one out of five and two out of four, respectively (table 2).
Seven minutes of exercise per day a few times a week though isn’t a magical elixir that will give you a bikini-ready body in a few weeks. Michelle Golla, of Denver-based Boost 180 Fitness, says, “it's important not to set unrealistic expectations for a 7-minute workout. It will not completely transform your body, but it is a great way to get your heart pumping and burn calories all day long when you're pressed for time.”  
The military press is similar to the shoulder press but is performed while standing with the feet together. (It is named "military" because of the similarity in appearance to the "at attention" position used in most militaries) Unlike the seated shoulder press, the military press involves the majority of the muscles of the core as stabilizers to keep the body rigid and upright, and is thus a more effective compound exercise.
Lisa Avellino, Fitness Director at NY Health and Wellness, says to grab a kitchen towel and engage in just 30 seconds of isometric motion with it. “Thirty seconds of opposing pull—like a human tug-a-war—will take any muscle to its maximum potential because you use your own bodyweight as resistance,” she explains. “The best part is that the stronger you are the more challenging the workout is, so you can never surpass maximum potential.” Speaking of the kitchen, check out these 25 Ways to Organize Your Kitchen for Weight Loss!

Trainer Natalie Uhling is all about the tried and true burpee for full body conditioning in 30 seconds—though she recommends three sets of 30-second burpees with a 15-second break between sets. For “quality” burpees, she says to do the following: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and a slight bend in your knees; make sure that you are not pushing through the toes of your feet but you are starting centered. As you jump, remember to land softly because you want to protect your joints. When you make your way down to the plank position, make sure your core is protected, that means keep your hips square and your butt out of the sky.
A simple example of an eccentric contraction is to hold something in your hand with your elbow bent. Slowly allow your elbow to straighten out while holding the weight.  You can visualize your bicep muscle lengthening as you are holding the weight while you are slowly straightening your elbow.  This is an eccentric contraction or eccentric loading of your bicep muscle.
Weighing yourself and keeping an exercise journal are two ways to track your progress, but taking your measurements (chest, arms, waist, hips) will give you a little more information. For example, you may be losing inches even if your scale weight doesn't change. In that case, monitoring your measurements every few weeks can reassure you that you are, in fact, slimming down.
Aerobic exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis and an increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria of skeletal muscle, which is one mechanism by which aerobic exercise enhances submaximal endurance performance.[98] [92][99] These effects occur via an exercise-induced increase in the intracellular AMP:ATP ratio, thereby triggering the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which subsequently phosphorylates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis.[92][99][100]
The relation between the increase in oxygen uptake (VO2) and increase in work rate (WR) between unloaded pedaling and maximal work during incremental cycle ergometer exercise was studied in normal men, men with uncomplicated systemic hypertension and ambulatory men with various cardiovascular diseases. The postulation was that impaired peripheral oxygen delivery would reduce the ratio of the ... [Show full abstract]Read more
At the twilight of his career, despite his personal success and loyal group of followers, Pilates was disappointed his philosophy was not adopted by all. However, a group of his followers became recognized mind–body educators in their own right. His dream was realized by them in the 1980s, when Contrology moved into and has since remained within mainstream acceptance and popularity as ‘Pilates.’39,42 Balanced Body, Inc. [Internet]. Origins of Pilates. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/pilates/origins-of-pilates.html.
But too much rest may do more harm than good. Once prescribed almost universally for back pain, illness, and discomfort of all kinds, bed rest has been shown in studies to be associated with loss of strength and endurance, changes in soft tissue, bone loss, joint disease, high blood pressure, and weakening of the cardiovascular system. It’s one reason falls are a danger for people over 80: The resulting injuries may heal, but the health complications from staying in bed for weeks can be irreversible.
How was it discovered that there is no such thing as an overall, general, cardiopulmonary fitness? Out of shape college kids were recruited for a study where they trained on a stationary bike for 90 days, but only one leg did the pedaling. Before they started training, their VO2max was tested, first using both legs, then only the left leg, and then just the right leg. (VO2max is a measurement of cardiopulmonary efficiency.) As you might imagine, all three results were the same. Then one leg was worked out for 90 days on the bicycle; the other leg got to continue to be a couch potato. At the end of the 90 days, you could tell by looking which leg had been exercised. Now for the revealing part. When VO2max was tested for the leg that had been trained, its VO2max improved as expected. But what do you think happened when the unexercised leg was tested? Do you think its VO2max also improved along with the other leg, or do your think there was no improvement. It's shocking how many personal trainers and exercise physiologists that I put this question to got it wrong. There was no improvement. Proving that cardiopulmonary efficiency is muscle specific. This means that when you get less winded, and your heart rate no longer rises as much after you've trained to do something, it's not your heart or lungs that accounted for the improvement, it's the muscles involved.
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