Back in mid-century America, you did old-style sit-ups, which were once regarded as the gold standard of iron-gut, military discipline. Maybe they still are, so if your idea of "manly" is messing up your lower back, go for it. But few fitness trainers recommend old-style sit-ups, though there are some re-conceptualized versions of them that might work for you.
Typical balance exercises include standing on one foot or walking heel to toe, with your eyes open or closed. The physical therapist may also have you focus on joint flexibility, walking on uneven surfaces, and strengthening leg muscles with exercises such as squats and leg lifts. Get the proper training before attempting any of these exercises at home.
In summary, Kuhn demonstrated substantial evidence in randomized clinical trials that exercise is effective for treating individuals with RCIS, thereby supporting its use in clinical practice. However, as Kuhn indicated, detail related to which specific exercises are best to prescribe is lacking. Thus, it might be premature to label this exercise protocol as a criterion standard based on current available evidence. In addition, the multifactored nature of RCIS indicates that individuals do not present with a homogeneous list of impairments. Therefore, we believe that using the same exercise program to treat everyone who has RCIS is inappropriate. An effective exercise program is derived not only from the pathoanatomic diagnosis but also from the synthesis of factors, such as pain, impairments, and functional limitations. Furthermore, we believe follow-up examinations might be necessary to modify and progress the individual's exercise program. Development of a classification-based treatment approach using evidence-based exercises with standardized exercise dosage and progression guidelines might optimize outcomes for individuals with RCIS.
Ten patients who consulted a sports physician with complaints of underperformance and fatigue participated in the present study. The eight men and two women had an average height and weight of 181±(8) cm and 68.4±(11.8) kg. All subjects were diagnosed by a sports physician according to the latest guidelines for overtraining diagnosis.1 18 A careful history including training history was taken, completed by a physical examination and a blood draw to rule out other possible causes for the complaints. Patients were diagnosed as NFO or OTS retrospectively according to the severity of symptoms and the total duration of symptoms and underperformance (ie, both before and after testing) when no medical explanation for the condition could be found. It turned out that a cutoff of 1-year total duration gave a good distinction between NFO and OTS patients. Demographic data and reported symptoms can be found in table 1. Data of subject 1 are the same as presented in an earlier publication.10 All subjects signed informed consent before participation.

Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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