* Strength building is an expensive metabolic process. Although we see it as building muscle, our body is making global metabolic adaptations. It is upgrading its metabolic efficiency by synthesizing more enzymes to make metabolism more capable. This includes aerobic metabolism, anaerobic metabolism, gluconeogenesis, glycogen breakdown and transport, blood buffering agents, and of course new muscle fiber growth. All of this new synthesis is extremely metabolically expensive; that is why your body will not make these changes unless an intense stimulus is applied, and the organism is left undisturbed afterwards to make these changes.
The mental benefits of barre are similar to yoga and Pilates, as it effectively increases mind-body awareness and mental clarity. Focus and concentration are required to perform the small precise movements utilized in barre. Allowing your mind to concentrate solely on your technique increases feelings of relaxation and decreases stress levels. Endorphins released during physical activity increase your general sense of well-being.
Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.
I did the original P90X and gained a lot of upper body strength. The one issue with the original P90X is that, after weeks and weeks of doing the videos, you start to realize how much Tony talks and how much time you're wasting -- standing there with your weights -- waiting for him to start the exercise. What I love about the + videos is that he cuts most of that out. It's straight to the exercise and he barrels through. It's a little disorienting in the beginning, as you don't know how to do the exercises at first, but it's so nice knowing that I can be finished with the workout in 30 minutes, instead of 60 for most of the regular P90X DVDS.
Now that you understand the vast amount of categories available to you, you can start narrowing the field of choices down by looking at the specifics of exercise videos and deciding which ones will be something you will not only enjoy but continue to use long term. If you are starting out as a beginner to exercise, then you should expect to upgrade your exercise videos as your fitness levels increase. You don’t have to stay with a beginner video when your fitness level advances to intermediate or advanced. Below are some factors to look at when looking at individual videos.

Data were analysed using three different methods: visual inspection, parametric statistics and calculation of sensitivity for both OTS and NFO detection. Because the sample size was rather small (ie, maximal 5 for each group), data were first inspected visually. Parametric statistics and sensitivity calculation were used to support conclusions from visual inspection of the data. For the purpose of visual inspection, we created graphs with averages and SE for both the OTS and the NFO groups.
Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet hip-width apart. Place arms at your side and lift up the spine and hips. Only the head, feet, arms, and shoulders should be on the ground. Then lift one leg upwards, keeping the core tight. Slowly bring the leg back down, then lift back up. Try to do 10 reps per leg, then bring the knee in place and spine back on the floor.
... Consequently, it was suggested that when determining LT in trained subjects, at least 8-min stages should be used ( Foxdal et al., 1996;Weltman et al., 1990). However, using such a stage duration would not allow maximal tasks to be assessed, since the duration of the whole procedure could result in an excess of fatigue or motivation ( Buchfuhrer et al., 1983). This was shown to compromise the V Á O 2max and maximum work-rate achievements (Bentley et al., 2007). ...

Question: Can you get a solid abs workout from yoga? Answer: Hell yeah! Kathryn Budig, author of THe Women’s Health Big Book of Yoga, teaches a core-blasting yoga series in this 20-minute video. She directs you through strengthening poses all while giving tips on form with the type of encouragement and reassurance you’d get if you were actually in class. (Bonus: The serene backdrop helps put you in a yoga mindset.)
Vinylcise has been historically neglected, and probably for good reason: it's terrible, and not very effective—at least not since we've had visual media alternatives. Can you imagine trying to follow along to an audio-only workout? At any rate, these workout records first appeared in the early 1920s, and were usually accompanied by a paper foldout with exercise diagrams (see the image). The earliest of these records appear to be the set of five Wallace Reducing Records released in 1920-1922 by the Wallace Institute of Chicago and pressed by Columbia Records. These records were marketed towards women, aiming to help them "get thin to music." Other exercise records of the 1920s included Victor Records for Health Exercises, released in 1922, the Battle Creek Sanitarium Health Ladder, directed by John Harvey Kellogg and released by Columbia Records in 1923, and Walter Camp's Daily Dozen, released in 1924.
Outdoors in nearby area and in nature was the most frequently reported exercise location in both training groups. This finding is in line with previous studies reporting that older adults prefer to exercise close to home [23, 30] and outdoors [23]. Interestingly, outdoors was the most common exercise location in both warmer and colder months despite the fact that colder months in Norway consist of more snow, higher prevalence of ice and relatively fewer hours of daylight compared to warmer months. The HIIT group had a higher proportion of sessions at a gym and sport facility compared to the MCT group. This finding is likely related to the fact that the HIIT group reported a higher proportion of sessions with exercise types commonly performed at these locations (e.g. swimming and other types of endurance training) compared to the MCT group. Some older adults might feel that it is easier to reach a high-intensity level with activities located at a gym and sports facility compared to outdoors.
3.  Move v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y but smoothly. "Explosive" movement is not only nonproductive, but also dangerous. Plus, moving slowly eliminates momentum, which ensures constant muscle loading. Make a movement last about ten seconds. (A chin-up should take about ten seconds from the lowest to the highest point, and then another ten seconds from the highest to the lowest point. Same goes for a push-up.) There is nothing to be gained from fast movements. Moving slowly prevents injury. (There are over 30 million exercise related injuries annually in this country; most of these can no doubt be attributed to high-force movement.) Keep your movements low-force and high-intensity. An analogy: If you attempt to lift your car quickly, you will likely injure yourself even if using proper form. If you try lifting it slowly and intensely, your chances of injury are nil. Think of how you drive your car over speed bumps... fast will cause damage to the car's suspension, slow will not.

Stability moves train your core to stay strong and steady. They also target your transverse abdominis, the deep ab muscle that does a 360 around your waist and draws it in, says Brent Brookbush, president of the Brookbush Institute of Human Movement Science in New York City. Try this stabilizer: Hold a dumbbell in your right hand and balance on your left leg. Squat on your left leg as you lower the weight toward your left foot. (More moves to try: grab a Bosu ball and challenge your core with this stability workout. Or you can snag one of these balance boards to work on your core as you watch your favorite TV show.)


The novelty of the present study is that of demonstrating the possibility of applying a specific vigorous physical exercise program [17] on healthy elderly adults over 65 years and evaluating its effects on functional capacity using the classical SFT [3]. To administer the high exercise intensity, we used a HR control under continuous accurate visual monitoring by a sport scientist. As expected, after only 12 weeks of training, we found significant enhancements of almost all skills tested. Our results clearly show that our VE program is relevant and has a positive impact on people over 65 in helping them to maintain a high quality of life. The difference from most of the literature [18–22] regards the exercise protocol intensity, which is usually milder than ours. Also, in the aforementioned studies there was a poor attention about the consequences of the exercise program on general quality of life of subjects. They mainly focused on the attenuated risks of falling. On the contrary, the SFTs applied in our study clearly show that our VE program may ameliorate several motor abilities and in turn the general quality of life in healthy elderly adults over 65 years of age. However, two other studies showed that elderly people need to exercise close to their limit of maximum capacity [23, 24] to improve their physical fitness but, unlike the present research, they were conducted on patients who were in deconditioning status linked to their chronic illnesses.
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