This is one way to spend your “rest” day. So instead of lounging on the couch all day you’ll schedule some sort of low-intensity activity like light walking or gentle yoga. The reason why you might want to do this, instead of nothing, is that incorporating gentle movement into these days can help with circulation (which can ease soreness and reduce muscle fatigue). And remember, whether it’s gentle activity or complete rest, your body needs time to recover—when you work out, you’re breaking down muscle fibers, and recovery is when the real magic happens as your muscles rebuild stronger.
The baseline testing included clinical examinations, physical tests and questionnaires about health and lifestyle. Age and sex were obtained from the National Population Registry. A previously described questionnaire provided information on physical activity level and sedentary time at baseline [19]. Detailed protocol for assessment of body weight (kg), body height (cm) and body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) is described elsewhere [19]. Testing of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak; mL/kg/min) was performed either as walking on a treadmill or cycling on a stationary bike. The test started with 10 min at a chosen warm-up speed. Approximately every two minutes, either the incline of the treadmill was increased by 2%, or the speed was increased by 1 km/h. The test protocol ended when participants were no longer able to carry a workload due to exhaustion or until all the criteria for a maximal oxygen uptake were reached [22].
2) Another critique related to safety (and one that betrays my affection for yoga) is the BREATH is not emphasized nearly enough. Breath and movement go hand in hand with yoga. This helps give much needed oxygen to the tissues when their demands are the highest, but it also helps the person move with the body instead of jerking the body into cranked up positions. I believe this is another spot that could contribute to injuries.
Dewayne Riggins, celebrity trainer and Founder and CEO of Inspirational Fitness, says you can work your quads and glutes with reverse lunges—30 seconds on each leg. How to do them: Stand in an upright position and then step back with one leg; bend knees as low as you can. Drop your back knee to one inch off the ground or as low as you can and be sure front knee is not leaning over the foot. Repeat with the other leg.
It’s not an exact science, but when you hear the term plyometric, you can go ahead and think jumping and breathlessness. Examples would include squat jumps, box jumps, broad jumps, and burpees. One of the main purposes of these explosive exercises is increasing power, says Laferrera. Having more power means you can recruit muscle fiber faster and more efficiently, which pays off when you’re moving heavy objects or working on sprinting drills in the gym, adds Lefkowith. Plus, because these moves get your heart rate up, they’re big calorie-burners. Here are seven plyometric moves you can do at home.
Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
Trainer Sara Haley loves 30 seconds a day of a core building exercise called resistance fight, which is especially great for those who’ve had children. “Lie on your back and lift one leg up to tabletop so that your knee is in line with your hip. Take your opposite hand and push against your thigh,” she says. “As you try to push your leg away with your hand, resist by pushing your leg into your hand in opposition. While all this is happening, you should be focusing on pulling your navel towards your spine and closing your rib cage. You may feel your body start to shake.” Be sure to hold for 15 seconds on each side. If your ears perked up at the mention of this being a great move for moms, then make sure you also look out for your kiddos with our report on 13 Scary Ingredients in Your Kid’s Lunch Box, Exposed!.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
×