Ken Hutchins' analysis is not just book theory; it is based on real experience training many, many thousands of subjects over a span of decades. He trained everyone from amateur and professional level athletes and bodybuilders to little old ladies with osteoporosis and also a great many genetically normal/average folks. He assisted Arthur Jones and Ellington Darden at Nautilus Sports Medical Industries where he first refined the Superslow method during a 5 years long clinical trial, the Nautilus Osteoporosis Study at The University of Florida Medical School in Gainesville (the study is mentioned in chapter 8 of the 1990 edition of "The Nautilus Book" by Ellington Darden, a book I highly recommend for beginning HIT practitioners). Hutchins' writing is as dry and clinical as one would expect to find in any textbook about medicine or engineering. It is also filled with rich insight into the intellectual processes and long history of carefully controlled experiments at Nautilus (and later Hutchins' own facilities) that brought Ken Hutchins to his current level of knowledge. His understanding of anatomy, biology, physics, engineering, psychology, history and sociology are all put to good use in this book and should enthrall any reader that possesses solid critical-thinking skills. Understanding the arguments for a distinction of "Exercise vs. Recreation", "The First Definition of Exercise" and "Requirements for Functional Ability" are crucial for everyone that cares even the slightest about the subject of human health, fitness, longevity or quality of life. These are not trivial matters.
The findings indicated that exercise improves outcomes of pain, strength, ROM impairments, and function in patients with impingement syndrome. In 10 studies, investigators reported improvements in pain with supervised exercise, home exercise, exercise associated with manual therapy, and exercise after subacromial decompression. Of the 6 studies in which researchers compared pre-exercise pain with postexercise pain, 5 demonstrated that exercise produced statistically significant and clinically important reductions in pain. Two studies demonstrated improvements in pain when comparing exercise and control groups. In 1 study, investigators evaluated bracing without exercise and found no difference in pain between the brace and exercise groups. Investigators evaluated exercise combined with manual therapy in 3 studies and demonstrated improvement in pain relief in each study and improvement in strength in 1 study. In most studies, exercise also was shown to improve function. The improvement in function was statistically significant in 4 studies and clinically meaningful in 2 of these studies. In 2 studies, researchers compared supervised exercise with a home exercise program and found that function improved in both groups but was not different between groups. This finding might have resulted from a type II statistical error. In 4 studies, researchers did not find differences between acromioplasty with exercise and exercise alone for pain alone or for outcomes of pain and function.
CrossFit Games: The sport of fitness has arrived (or so claims Reebok, the official sponsor of the CrossFit Games). Each summer the CrossFit Games test participants with a barrage of physical challenges and workouts, ranging from swimming and running to pull-ups and handstand walks (sorry, Kobayashi, hot-dog eating has yet to make an appearance). Participants accrue points over the events, and the male and female winners are crowned World’s Fittest Man & Woman. Sectional and Regional qualifiers narrow the field before the annual Games Weekend.
Celebrity fitness instructor Tracy Anderson (clients include Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Jennifer Lopez) offers six 10-minute, total-body dance workouts in this DVD. The first lesson covers basic steps, while the other workouts have titles like "Cardio Party" and "Sweat Fest." Don't worry if you have two left feet: Even novice dancers can master these moves.
Anyone who watched Jackie Warner on Bravo's Work Out knows she takes a tough-love approach to fitness. And, clearly, if you've checked out her abs lately, it works. She shares her signature circuit-training workout in this high-energy DVD that gives the option of four different 15-minute workouts or one 40-minute total body circuit, and left me feeling like I just had an up-close-and-personal training session with the exercise guru.

Pull-ups have become the quintessential move to any CrossFit workout. HOW TO DO IT: To complete a pull-up, start by hanging from a secured bar with your hands in an overhand grip (palm pointing outward, away from your body) and slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. While squeezing your traps together and engaging your abs, pull yourself up to the bar so that your chin passes over. MUSCLES USED: Back, core, shoulders and chest.
How was it discovered that there is no such thing as an overall, general, cardiopulmonary fitness? Out of shape college kids were recruited for a study where they trained on a stationary bike for 90 days, but only one leg did the pedaling. Before they started training, their VO2max was tested, first using both legs, then only the left leg, and then just the right leg. (VO2max is a measurement of cardiopulmonary efficiency.) As you might imagine, all three results were the same. Then one leg was worked out for 90 days on the bicycle; the other leg got to continue to be a couch potato. At the end of the 90 days, you could tell by looking which leg had been exercised. Now for the revealing part. When VO2max was tested for the leg that had been trained, its VO2max improved as expected. But what do you think happened when the unexercised leg was tested? Do you think its VO2max also improved along with the other leg, or do your think there was no improvement. It's shocking how many personal trainers and exercise physiologists that I put this question to got it wrong. There was no improvement. Proving that cardiopulmonary efficiency is muscle specific. This means that when you get less winded, and your heart rate no longer rises as much after you've trained to do something, it's not your heart or lungs that accounted for the improvement, it's the muscles involved.

Your body has that whole breathing thing on lock, but there's more than one way to inhale and exhale and some require extra work from the abs. "Kapalabhati breathing engages the transverse abdominis to push out the breath," says Allison Candelaria, owner of Soul Yoga in Oklahoma City. Here's how to do it: Sit tall, then strongly and quickly pull your navel toward your spine. Then release your ab muscles, forcing you to exhale. Work up to doing that 20 times, inhaling and letting your belly expand between each "pump." (This belly bonfire breathing technique can also help you fire up your body anywhere, anytime.)
Alternatively, anaerobic means an “absence of free oxygen.” It’s any form of high-intensity exercise that leaves you winded relatively quickly. A well developed aerobic system can produce energy for a long time, while your anaerobic capabilities cease anywhere from 10–120 seconds. Weightlifting, sprinting, plyometrics and HIIT are examples of anaerobic exercise. Explosiveness and an ability to generate power and or speed in small bursts is a trait of athletes that require anaerobic capabilities. Interestingly, the more developed your aerobic system, the longer it takes to burn through your anaerobic system. In this respect, you can think of aerobic exercise as a building block for anaerobic capacity.

All data are presented as means ± standard deviation (SD) unless stated. Assumptions of statistical tests such as normal distribution and sphericity of data were checked as appropriate. Greenhouse-Geisser correction to the degrees of freedom was applied when violations to sphericity were present. For reliability statistics, assumptions of homoscedasticity and heteroscedasticity were checked as appropriate. Reliability analysis was conducted following the guidelines provided by Atkinson and Nevill [19]. Our sample size of eight subjects is comparable to previous studies using high-intensity OLDE [8, 11, 17].
One hundred and sixty-seven subjects (77 males and 90 females), aged 18–50 years, performed a modified Bruce protocol before (pre) and after (post) a weight loss program of 24 weeks. This program combined physical training (strength, S; endurance, E; combined strength + endurance, SE; or physical activity recommendation, PA) 3 times per week, with a 25%–30% caloric restriction diet.
Super Set. Instead of tweeting about how sweaty you are after each set, push muscle groups by coupling exercise with another set that focuses on a different body part, for example: back and chest, bi's and tri's, Tom and Jerry. Research suggests lifting in supersets can be just as effective as normal sets at building strength while adding an additional cardio component The metabolic costs of reciprocal supersets vs. traditional resistance exercise in young recreationally active adults. Kelleher, A.R. Musculoskeletal and Human Performance Laboratories, Department of Exercise Science, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, USA; Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2010 Apr;24(4):1043-51.. Or for added punch, do similar body parts — shoulders and shoulders, legs and legs — for a serious burn.

This program isn’t just for the true beginner who has never touched a weight before; it’s also suitable for anyone who has taken an extended leave of absence from training. How long has it been since you went to the gym regularly? Six months? A year? Five years? No worries: The following routines will get you back on track in—you guessed it—just four short weeks. Let’s get to work.
In both groups, men had a higher proportion of cycling, cross-country skiing and jogging sessions compared to women (Fig. 4). Men also had a higher proportion of sessions with combined endurance and resistance training and domestic activities than women. In contrast, women had a higher proportion of walking, swimming and dancing sessions than men. There were no sex differences in resistance training and other types of endurance training (Fig. 4).
A simple example of an eccentric contraction is to hold something in your hand with your elbow bent. Slowly allow your elbow to straighten out while holding the weight.  You can visualize your bicep muscle lengthening as you are holding the weight while you are slowly straightening your elbow.  This is an eccentric contraction or eccentric loading of your bicep muscle.

LSR, SBS, HV, NPA, JEI, UW and DS contributed to the conception and design of the study. LSR, SBS, HV and DS were responsible for the collection of the Generation 100 data in cooperation with colleagues at the Cardiac Exercise Research Group at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. LSR, SBS and XT provided the data for analysis. LSR undertook the data analysis and drafted the manuscript. All authors provided critical insight and revisions to the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript submitted for publication.
Yoga is appropriate for individuals of all ages and fitness levels. Those who are seeking a workout that increases their mind, body and spiritual awareness will find yoga to be a good fit for them. Those who wish to increase their fitness level at a slower pace may find that yoga is perfect for them, although the physical intensity is just as high as in many other exercise methods. Yoga exercises utilize a variety of muscle groups at the same time, so an entire body workout is often achieved during each class. Yoga is effective in toning muscles without creating a bulky look.
We've said it before, but HIIT really does the job when you want to trim ab fat: A study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that people who did two HIIT and two strength sessions a week lost more visceral fat (11 percent of the dangerous kind around your organs)—about an extra inch from their waist—than those who ran twice and did two strength sessions. Plus, many of those speedy intervals, such as sprints, are total-body moves that engage your abs big time. Do speed bursts on a cardio machine or try three-minute boxing rounds (another transverse tightener) with a minute of active recovery in between. This unique HIIT workout incorporates some boxing moves and some weight training for double the benefits. (Don't get along with HIIT training? Studies show adding music will make it more enjoyable.)
When visual inspection gave an indication for group differences, parametric statistical analyses were performed through ANOVA with repeated measures with one withinsubjects factor (post-values for first and second exercise test) and one between-subjects factor (NFO or OTS) or through an independent samples t test. Those analyses were performed in SPSS V.15.0. Sensitivity was also calculated for these variables by dividing the number of correct OTS or NFO diagnoses by hormonal analysis by the total number of OTS or NFO diagnoses according to the consensus statement.1 Sensitivity was presented as a ratio. The denominator varies because of random missing values.
How to: Keep your feet shoulder-width apart and your back straight. Bend your knees and lower your rear as if you were sitting down in a chair. Your weight should be evenly distributed on 3 points of your feet -- heel, outaside ball, inside ball -- that form a triangle. Your knees won't stay in line with your ankles that way, but there will be less strain on other parts of your body.  Add dumbbells once you can do 12 reps with good form.
Each reliability session took place on a Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning at the same time and within the same week. All subjects were given written instructions to drink 35 ml of water per kilogram of body weight, sleep for at least 7 h, refrain from the consumption of alcohol, and avoid any vigorous exercise the day before each visit. Participants were also instructed to avoid any caffeine and nicotine for at least 3 h before testing. Finally, subjects were instructed to consume a set breakfast (2 slices of toast spread with margarine or butter, 250 ml of orange juice, and a banana) 1 h before all testing sessions. At each visit to the lab, subjects were asked to complete a pre-test checklist to ascertain that they had complied with the instructions given to them, and were asked to report any pain or soreness experienced in their leg (to check for the presence of previous session-induced muscle damage). None of our subjects reported leg muscle pain or soreness at the beginning of each session.
Walking is simple, yet powerful. It can help you stay trim, improve cholesterol levels, strengthen bones, keep blood pressure in check, lift your mood, and lower your risk for a number of diseases (diabetes and heart disease, for example). A number of studies have shown that walking and other physical activities can even improve memory and resist age-related memory loss.

6.  If an exercise can be done for more than 90 seconds, increase the resistance so that momentary muscular failure occurs within 45 - 90 seconds (this is considered "high-intensity" exercise). If you can do sit-ups for ten minutes, the intensity is insufficient to cross that threshold mentioned above, and you're just wasting valuable physiological resources. If you can't do even one rep, reduce the resistance (i.e. if doing a push-up, change from being on your toes to on your knees, or start from the top and slowly lower yourself; if using a machine, choose a lower setting; if using free-weights, pick a lower weight; if doing a chin-up, use a chair to boost yourself up to the top, then take your feet off the chair and slowly lower yourself).
... Consequently, it was suggested that when determining LT in trained subjects, at least 8-min stages should be used ( Foxdal et al., 1996;Weltman et al., 1990). However, using such a stage duration would not allow maximal tasks to be assessed, since the duration of the whole procedure could result in an excess of fatigue or motivation ( Buchfuhrer et al., 1983). This was shown to compromise the V Á O 2max and maximum work-rate achievements (Bentley et al., 2007). ...
In line with the previous literature, our study showed that walking was the most common exercise type among older adults [24, 25]. This result is not surprising as walking is among the most cost effective and accessible means of exercise [26]. In addition, walking has been identified as a relatively safe exercise alternative to older adults [25]. We found that walking was the most common exercise type in both training groups. However, the MCT group had a higher proportion of walking sessions than the HIIT group, while the HIIT group had a higher proportion of sessions with for instance jogging and cycling. This might indicate that some older adults in the HIIT group feel that it is easier to achieve a high-intensity level when performing jogging and cycling compared to walking. Absolute workload at a given intensity varies greatly among individuals with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) [27], so that e.g. walking at 5 km/h corresponds to moderate intensity for an individual with relatively high CRF level, while the same speed exhibits near-maximal intensity for an individual with low CRF. Therefore, the type of exercise an individual need to perform in order to achieve a feeling of high intensity varies from one individual to another [27]. Since ageing often results in CRF decline [28], it is likely that many older adults will reach a feeling of high-intensity when walking. However, those with a high CRF level might need to perform other exercise types, for instance jogging and cycling, to reach the same intensity level during their workout session.
This study was supported by grants from the Liaison Committee for education, research and innovation in Central Norway, The K.G Jebsen Foundation for medical research and the Research Council of Norway. The funding organizations had no role in the design and execution of the study, in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data, or in the preparation, review or approval of the submitted manuscript.
Association of exercise type with sex in the MCT (a) and HIIT (b) groups. Data are presented as proportions of the total number of exercise sessions. Other type of endurance; treadmill, cross trainer, aerobics etc., Domestic activities; housework, gardening etc., Other: golf, bowling, horseback riding etc. *Significantly different from men (p < 0.05)
The physical benefits of Pilates include an increase in muscle strength and tone without creating bulk. The increase in deep core muscle strength helps to make your abdominal muscles look tight and toned. It also improves your flexibility and posture, which can decrease your chances of injuring yourself. Pilates is also effective in easing chronic lower back pain and preventing future back pain and injuries.
Although exercise testing is useful in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, a rapid comprehensive method for measurement of ventilation and gas exchange has been limited to expensive complex computer-based systems. We devised a relatively inexpensive, technically simple, and clinically oriented exercise system built around a desktop calculator. This system ... [Show full abstract]Read more
I personally admit to having roller-coaster exercise habits myself. I’ll be a gym rat for three months, followed by four months of sloth and busy-ness. A few years ago, I finally realized how crappy I felt when I hadn’t exercised, and I resolved to find some way to ensure I was at least getting some exercise every day -- even when I couldn’t make it to the gym.

To determine the acute action of cigarette smoking on cardiorespiratory function under stress, the immediate effects of cigarette smoking on the ventilatory, gas exchange, and cardiovascular responses to exercise were studied in nine healthy male subjects. Each subject performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on two separate days, one without smoking (control) and one after smoking 3 ... [Show full abstract]Read more
Jump up ^ Rhodes, J. S; Van Praag, H; Jeffrey, S; Girard, I; Mitchell, G. S; Garland Jr, T; Gage, F. H (2003). "Exercise increases hippocampal neurogenesis to high levels but does not improve spatial learning in mice bred for increased voluntary wheel running". Behavioral Neuroscience. 117 (5): 1006–16. doi:10.1037/0735-7044.117.5.1006. PMID 14570550.
The recent “consensus statement” of the European College of Sport Science indicates that the difference between NFO and OTS is the amount of time needed for performance restoration and not the type or duration of training stress or degree of impairment.1 In essence, it is generally thought that symptoms of OTS, such as fatigue, performance decline and mood disturbances, are more severe than those of NFO. However, there is no scientific evidence to either confirm or refute this suggestion.1 The distinction between NFO and OTS is most of the time based on “time to recover”. Hence, there is a need for objective, immediately available evidence that the athlete is indeed experiencing OTS.
2. The "For Dummies" series. Any of the "Dummies" series videos (like Shaping up with Weights for Dummies, Pilates for Weight Loss for Dummies and Basic Yoga for Dummies) are usually excellent, says Zurowski. These videos go slowly, explain the workout clearly, and show the exercise from multiple angles. The instructor is always alone, so there are no distractions. Another good feature of this series is that it also shows mistakes to avoid, says Glenna.
Early motor skills and development have also shown to be related to physical activity and performance later in life. Children who have more proficient motor skills early on are more inclined to being physically active, and thus tend to perform well in sports and have better fitness levels. Early motor proficiency has a positive correlation to childhood physical activity and fitness levels, while less proficiency in motor skills results in a tendency to partake in a more sedentary lifestyle.[20]
VO2peak improved in overweight and obese males (pre and post values in L/min, respectively; W = 3.2 ± 0.6 vs. 3.7 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; O = 3.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6, p = 0.013) as well as in overweight females (2.0 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.4, p < 0.001). VO2peak in the first ventilatory threshold (VT1) increased for all 4 interventions in males (p < 0.05), except for S in the obese group (1.6 ± 0.2 vs. 1.7 ± 0.3, p = 0.141). In females, it increased in E (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.4 ± 0.3, p < 0.001), SE (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.003), and PA (0.9 ± 0.1 vs. 1.2 ± 0.2, p = 0.006) in overweight groups. Time-to-exhaustion improved in all subjects except for females in PA group (15.7 ± 0.3 min vs. 15.9 ± 0.3 min, p = 0.495).
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