Samples were collected in prefrozen 4.5 ml K3 EDTA vacutainer tubes (Becton Dickinson Vacutainer System Europe, Plymouth, UK) and immediately centrifuged at 3000 rpm (Minifuge 2, Heraeus, Germany) for 10 min, and plasma was frozen at −20°C until further analysis. Samples were assayed via RIA for cortisol (DiaSorin, Stillwater, Minnesota, USA), ACTH (Nichols Institute Diagnostics, San Juan Capistrano, California, USA), PRL (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) and GH (Pharmacia & Upjohn Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden).
The daily practice of the mind–body exercises took only a few minutes, to blend in with modern life rather than to dominate it. The exercises could be performed in private with no competitive, commercial, or political emphasis or personal ignominy. The MMB pioneers were against unnatural purpose-made exercise machinery, which was viewed as unnecessary and even dangerous. An exception was Pilates and his equipment. However, the revolutionary devices were designed (and succeeded) to improve the effect of Contrology exercises and philosophy, and to enhance the method’s natural experience and acceptance.
Since our data is self-reported, we do not know for sure if we have data from all exercise sessions performed throughout the year. Furthermore, subjective measures are susceptible to recall bias, especially among older adults [17, 18]. However, our results are based on nearly 70000 exercise logs, which is the largest data material on exercise patterns in older adults. In addition, exercise logs have an advantage over the widely employed exercise questionnaires where the subject is asked to recall exercise performed in the past as opposed to recording the exercise right after the moment of occurrence, as is the case with exercise logs.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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