Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854.  Ling founded the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute in Stockholm in 1822, was an elected member of the Swedish General Medical Association, member of the Swedish Academy, and a Titular Professor. However, Ling remained indifferent to these honors due to the lack of the establishment’s implementation of his methods.7 Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854. [Google Scholar]

Around 1900, Tasmanian-born Australian professional reciter and theatrical producer Frederick Alexander developed a novel methodology to harmonize full-body functional movements. As a child, Alexander suffered respiratory ailments, leading to the initial purpose of developing the method – to normalize his personal voice function in order to materialize a stage performance dream. In 1902, Alexander established the Sydney Dramatic and Operatic Conservatorium and in 1904, moved to London to spread his teaching method. During the first years, Alexander focused on teaching ‘full chest breathing’ techniques mainly to stage artists and people with breathing pathologies.19 Staring J. Frederick Matthias Alexander 1869-1955. The Origins and History of the Alexander Technique. A medical historical analysis of F.M. Alexander’s life, work, technique, and writings. Nijmegen: Radboud Universiteit; 2005. [Google Scholar] However, he soon discovered that retrieving the natural ‘conscious control’ via mindful postures and movements resulted in benefits not only for the vocal health and performance but also the health and performance of the whole body and mind.20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar] This holistic evolvement transformed the newly formed ‘Alexander Technique’ into a general remedy and preventative tool suitable for all populations. Alexander explained in his 1910 book ‘Man’s Supreme Inheritance:’20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar]

Publications, establishment recognition, and public support followed the success. In 1932, Fairbairn was elected President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.31 Fairbairn JS. Obituary. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 1944;51:152–6.10.1111/bjo.1944.51.issue-2[Crossref] [Google Scholar] In 1936, Morris (in collaboration with Randell) published ‘Maternity and Post-Operative Exercises,’ that illustrated exercises for pregnant and puerperal women and those who had been operated on. The book emphasized breathing, relaxation, conscious training of the pelvic floor muscles, and re-establishing good posture.32 Morris M. Maternity and post-operative exercises. London: Heinemann; 1936. [Google Scholar] A year later, Morris published ‘Basic Physical Training’ for the general public, dedicated to ‘all those who, realising the inter-dependence of mental and physical well-being, are working to raise the standard of health.’33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] In 1939, Randell published her seminal textbook ‘Training for Childbirth - From the Mothers Point of View’ which described her philosophy in detail with related anatomy and pathology and exercise descriptions and instructions.25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] This was followed up in 1949 with ‘Fearless Childbirth’, a practical manual for mothers-to-be.34 Randell M. Fearless childhood. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1953. [Google Scholar]
One of the difficulties in diagnosing OTS is that this should be based on “exclusion criteria”.1 18 Although, in recent years, the knowledge of central pathomechanisms of the OTS has significantly increased, there is still a strong demand for relevant tools for the early diagnosis of OTS. By calculating sensitivity for detection of NFO and OTS, a good indication of the value of the different measures for the diagnosis of unexplainable underperformance is obtained (table 2).
Individual and group time to exhaustion duration are presented Table 2. Time to exhaustion duration ranged from 3.94 to 9.44 min (S1: 6.07 ± 1.71 min, S2: 5.59 ± 0.99 min, S3: 6.23 ± 1.68 min) and did not differ between sessions (P = 0.156). Individual and group CV are presented in Table 2. The ICC was 0.795 (0.493, 0.950). The typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and the smallest worthwhile change was 0.28 min. Bland-Altman plots for raw and log transformed data are presented in Fig 3. LOA was equal to 15.59.

Stephanie Mansour, weight loss and lifestyle coach for women, has a great way to get your triceps toned while you’re watching TV. Just do 30 tricep dips on your couch. Here’s how: “Hands on edge of couch, fingers facing you. Bend your knees at 90-degree angle, scooting your butt up so it almost touches the couch,” she says. “Bend at the elbows, lower your body down, then press back up and straighten your arms. Repeat for 30 seconds to work on arm flab.”

Two other methods of exercise may be seen in private companies. Exercise by means of a promissory note may be offered in place of cashless exercise/same-day sale. Because the stock of private companies is unregistered, no trading market exists, making cashless exercise impossible. Pre-IPO companies that allow reverse vesting may offer loans to fund early exercise. This practice enables employees to start the holding period for capital gain tax treatment.


If the proliferation of many websites on the subject (not to mention the co-worker who won't let you forget he does CrossFit, bro) are any indication, the first rule of CrossFit is never stop talking about CrossFit. And while this would seem to encourage certainty about what CrossFit actually is, there are a lot of myths and generalizations to clear up about the workout regimen.
Pull-ups have become the quintessential move to any CrossFit workout. HOW TO DO IT: To complete a pull-up, start by hanging from a secured bar with your hands in an overhand grip (palm pointing outward, away from your body) and slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. While squeezing your traps together and engaging your abs, pull yourself up to the bar so that your chin passes over. MUSCLES USED: Back, core, shoulders and chest.

Warm up. This is the act of preparing your body for the stress of exercise. The body can be warmed up with light intensity aerobic movements like walking slowly. These movements increase blood flow, which in turn heats up muscles and joints. "Think of it as a lube job for the body," Bryant explains. At the end of your warm-up, it's a good idea to do a little light stretching.
Flexibility exercise, or stretching, is a vital component of any exercise regimen. The primary purpose of flexibility training is to increase your range of motion, especially when it comes to muscles and joints. Although flexibility exercise will not improve your endurance or strength as cardio or anaerobic exercise would, flexibility training helps your body maintain its natural alignment. By doing so, flexibility exercise makes your body significantly less prone to injury during cardio or anaerobic exercise. Additionally, practicing flexibility training will increase your freedom of movement in a way that makes everyday activities easier. Tasks such as reaching up for an object on a shelf, getting up from a chair, or even sitting in confined spaces for long periods of time will greatly benefit from flexibility training.
... Differences in the duration of each stage and the load increments can alter the cardiorespiratory and metabolic response, and therefore the measurement ( Bentley et al., 2007;Julio et al., 2017). As suggested by pioneering studies (Buchfuhrer et al., 1983;Lukaski et al., 1989), recent investigations ( Midgley et al., 2007) and reviews ( Julio et al., 2017), traditional longer GXTs (i.e., 20-30 min) to determine LT including increments each 3-5 min would prevent the athlete from achieving their MAS due to accumulative fatigue, dehydration, muscle acidosis, and cardiovascular drift. This is critical because MAS is a pertinent and widespread criterion to set training intensities for endurance disciplines (Billat and Koralsztein, 1996;Jones and Carter, 2000). ...
DC-based personal trainer Chris Perrin says to do hip bridges if you want to get your derriere round and toned. “Lie on the floor. With bent legs, place both feet flat on the floor. Both arms down, hands on each side of your hips,” he explains. “Raise your low back off the floor by pushing through the heels of the feet. Once your hips are at their highest point—without straining your back—pause and return your lower back to the floor.” And squeeze those glutes the entire time!

Between August 2012 and June 2013, all men and women born between years 1936 to 1942 (aged 70–77 years), with a permanent address in the municipality of Trondheim, Norway, were invited to participate in a randomized controlled trial, the Generation 100 study. The primary aim of Generation 100 is to determine the effect of five years of exercise training on morbidity and mortality. The Generation 100 study protocol and study sample characteristics have been published previously [19].
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.3 Perspectives for Progress “Physical Activity as Cause and Cure of Muscular Pain: Evidence of Underlying Mechanisms” from authors Karen Søgaard and Gisela Sjøgaard. Work-related physical activity (PA), in terms of peak loads and sustained and/or repetitive contractions, presents risk factors for the development of muscular pain and disorders. However, PA as a training tailored to the employee’s work exposure, health, and physical capacity offers prevention and rehabilitation. We suggest the concept of “Intelligent Physical Exercise Training” relying on evidence-based sports science training principles.
Endurance performance (i.e. exercise duration > 1 min) is extensively studied in exercise physiology using cycling and/or running exercise (e.g. [1–4]). Despite being close to real competition events by involving the whole-body, the use of cycling and/or running exercise presents some important limitations to understand the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance. Indeed, as whole-body exercise involves greater systemic responses than isolated exercise [5], it is difficult to interpret some specific experimental manipulations aiming to understand CNS processes regulating muscle fatigue and endurance performance (e.g. manipulation of III-IV muscle afferents [6, 7]). Furthermore, due to the need to transfer the participant from the treadmill/bicycle to the ergometer, the true extent of muscle fatigue at exhaustion is underestimated [8], leading to inconclusive results on how peripheral (i.e. fatigue produced by changes at or distal to the neuromuscular junction [9]) and central (i.e. decrease in maximal voluntary activation level [9]) components of muscle fatigue might interact between each other’s (for review see [2, 9]). Therefore, due to the aforementioned limitations, the development of a new exercise model is required to better investigate the CNS processes regulating endurance performance.
Recruiting lasted 6 months starting from September 2013. Participants were recruited by means of family doctors to whom the goal of the study was explained. The recruitment flow chart is shown in Figure 1. Three hundred and fifty people aged ≥ 65 were invited to participate. Of these, 51.4% agreed to be included in the screening list while 48.6% refused to participate, mainly for family reasons such as illness/hospitalization/old age of a family member. Forty people were found eligible to participate in the research protocol. Randomly, twenty were assigned to VE and twenty to the control group. The latter were instructed not to take part in any physical activity throughout the study period. All the selected participants signed an informed consent. The study was performed according to the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the local ethics committee on September 23, 2013.
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