Jump up ^ Möhlenkamp S, Lehmann N, Breuckmann F, Bröcker-Preuss M, Nassenstein K, Halle M, Budde T, Mann K, Barkhausen J, Heusch G, Jöckel KH, Erbel R (200). "Running: the risk of coronary events : Prevalence and prognostic relevance of coronary atherosclerosis in marathon runners". Eur. Heart J. 29 (15): 1903–10. doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehn163. PMID 18426850.

The beneficial effect of exercise on the cardiovascular system is well documented. There is a direct correlation between physical inactivity and cardiovascular mortality, and physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. Low levels of physical exercise increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases mortality.[22]

Dancer, choreographer, stunt woman and fitness expert Kelly Connolly says you can shrink your waist in 30 seconds a day with “salsa swivels.” “It’s no secret that dancing is a great way to trim down and tone without even realizing you’re exercising,” she says. “The high energy and twisting motions of Salsa dancing can have a significant impact on your body while giving you some new moves to take to the dance floor.”
It should be emphasised that, depending on the training status, the time the hormone measurements are taken (diurnal variation), urinary, blood and salivary measures create a great variation inthe interpretation of the results. In pathological situations such as in major depression,15 16 post-traumatic stress disorder,17 and probably also in OTS,10 the glucocorticoids and the brain monoaminergic systems apparently fail to restrain the HPA response to stress. Indeed, we recently showed that a test protocol with two consecutive maximal exercise tests separated by 4 h may give a good indication of the HPA response to stress in well-trained and FO athletes relative to a case of OTS.10 We found a suppression of the HPA response to the second exercise bout in the OTS athlete as opposed to the normal responses. The question can be asked if this method is also a valuable tool to make a distinction between NFO and OTS. Therefore, we report the results of 10 patients who were referred to our laboratory with the diagnosis of suspicion of NFO or OTS.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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