My fitness goal is strength and powerlifting, so I focus on strength training, specifically on four main lifts: Overhead Press, Deadlift, Bench Press and Squat. I have a laundry list of accessory exercises I do that support muscle development in critical areas for the main lifts and strength in general. It’s been working pretty well, but I recently got to a point where I wanted to do more exercise that required movement and fast-paced work. Now I do three days of strength and two days of conditioning. My conditioning days are similar to the circuit training workouts mentioned above and one day, in particular, includes more aerobic conditioning to improve that area specifically. There’s no point in being strong if you can’t also move well!
Okay, this one if for the kids, but grown-ups can do it to too. With animated instructions, catchy music, and all the basics of the other full-body workouts, this is another top choice overall. The exercises include some more advanced moves, like tricep dips with a chair and push-ups with rotation, so it’s a great one to do with your kids.                                    
Major variants: incline ~ (more emphasis on the upper pectorals), decline ~ (more emphasis on the lower pectorals), narrow grip ~ (more emphasis on the triceps), push-up (face down using the body weight), neck press (with the bar over the neck, to isolate the pectorals), vertical dips (using parallel dip bars) or horizontal dips (using two benches with arms on the near bench and feet on the far bench, and dropping the buttocks to the floor and pushing back up.)

Exclusion criteria included major diseases or conditions such as severe heart disease, uncontrolled hypertension, obesity, osteoarticular pathology, and neurological disease. Criteria were evaluated on the basis of clinical history, resting ECG, and physical examination. Participants maintained their lifestyles and were instructed not to take part in any other physical programs throughout the study. At the time of the initial design, the study consisted of a 12-week randomized controlled trial with a frequency of 3 times a week, 36 sessions in all, ending with a new assessment of their wellness and the potential persistence of the results on functional/physical capacities.
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