One new exercise is added to each bodypart routine to provide even more angles from which to train your target muscles to promote complete development. You’ll hit each muscle group with two exercises of 3­–4 sets each: four sets for large bodyparts (chest, back, shoulders, quads, hamstrings) and three sets for smaller bodyparts (biceps, triceps, abs, calves). The result is 16 total sets for the week for large bodyparts and 12 sets total for smaller ones—again, working in the 8–15-rep range—which is a substantial increase in volume from Week 1.
If the proliferation of many websites on the subject (not to mention the co-worker who won't let you forget he does CrossFit, bro) are any indication, the first rule of CrossFit is never stop talking about CrossFit. And while this would seem to encourage certainty about what CrossFit actually is, there are a lot of myths and generalizations to clear up about the workout regimen.
The overhead squat requires strength and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: You can take the bar from a squat rack by snatching it overhead or by cleaning and jerking it. The arms should be wider on the bar, very similar to a snatch grip. The feet should be a little outside of shoulder-width. Brace your core, and send your butt back into a squat position while keeping your arms locked overhead. A good cue to think of is “show me your pits” or bending the bar, which automatically externally rotates the shoulders and locks them into a strong position. Once you have reached below parallel, drive your knees out, squeeze your glutes and stand the bar back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders and back.
Various weighted dumbbells. Some exercises require heavier weights, while others will need lighter weights or none at all. Try to have a range of dumbbells: a light set (3 to 5 pounds for women, 5 to 8 pounds for men), a medium set (5 to 10 pounds for women, 10 to 15 pounds for men), and a heavy set (10 to 20 pounds for women, 15 to 30 pounds for men).
5.  Even when you can't complete another repetition, keep trying to complete this "impossible rep". Even though you aren't moving, metabolic work is being done, and a more thorough "inroad" to muscular failure is accomplished. "Pushing to failure" signals the body to upgrade its capabilities ("adaptive response")... something it will not do unless given a good reason to.
Why do we exercise? We all know it's good for our health, but have you ever thought about it?  Do you exercise the way you do because you've heard that's the way it should be done? Is it possible that the current way of working out could be good for some parts of our body, but bad for others... are we doing more harm than good? Are we spending more time exercising than we need to?

(2) Active Phase (between 60% and 84% HRR). Continuous dynamic and interval training mode exercise involving large muscle activities with an increasing level of difficulty and intensity. Subjects began with a short walk, alternated with various step exercises (e.g., both side and forward-backward step up and down on the platform, with alternate footsteps). Then, they went on performing alternate upper-limb lifts (while keeping inferior limbs flexed) and lower limb flexions and extensions (knee lifts, both side and forward-backward leg lifts, and leg curls), as a sort of brief and easy sequence to be repeated for a fixed time. Integrated multiple plane exercises for upper and lower limbs using elastic resistances (Xertube®) completed the last part of the Active Phase. To reach the goal of gradually augmenting the intensity of the program, the coach continuously checked the HRR level of subjects who were progressively increasing the duration and the number of exercises. The resistance of the elastic bands was also increased by one level (from very light to medium) every 4 weeks.
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