Walking is simple, yet powerful. It can help you stay trim, improve cholesterol levels, strengthen bones, keep blood pressure in check, lift your mood, and lower your risk for a number of diseases (diabetes and heart disease, for example). A number of studies have shown that walking and other physical activities can even improve memory and resist age-related memory loss.
We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.
Major variants: incline ~ (more emphasis on the upper pectorals), decline ~ (more emphasis on the lower pectorals), narrow grip ~ (more emphasis on the triceps), push-up (face down using the body weight), neck press (with the bar over the neck, to isolate the pectorals), vertical dips (using parallel dip bars) or horizontal dips (using two benches with arms on the near bench and feet on the far bench, and dropping the buttocks to the floor and pushing back up.)

My favorites are all free, though you can subscribe for more features to most of them as well. But free works just fine. They’re all available on iOS and Android (except for one). They’re all built around the science-based concept of high-intensity circuit training using body weight, so you don’t need any fancy equipment. I’ve done these in hotel rooms, my office, parks, and even in a quiet corner at the airport waiting to get on a plane.
During the time to exhaustion tests, all perceptual and physiological measurements increased over time. The increase in heart rate is similar to a previous study using the same exercise on a different ergometer [18]. Furthermore, these authors demonstrated that the respiratory system is not a limiting factor for this exercise. Despite we did not measure the maximum heart rate of our subjects via a typical whole-body incremental test (e.g. cycling), it is clear that a heart rate of ~ 130 beats/min is faraway of the maximum heart rate capacity of our subjects. Therefore, taking all together, these results confirm that high intensity OLDE performed until exhaustion is not limited by the cardiorespiratory system.
Whether you are a newbie CrossFitter or a seasoned veteran, there are foundational movements that everyone should master prior to completing a WOD (Workout of the Day). On the next slides, we’ll show 16 essential CrossFit moves that you need to know. These moves are proven to increase your strength, build your lung capacity and make you the best athlete you can be. Proper form is essential to avoid injury.
Challenge yourself with interval training. Interval training involves alternating high-intensity and low-intensity exercises, and it’s a great way to burn calories. Since it involves high-intensity activities, such as running or sprinting, it's best to include interval training in your routine if you're already used to regular exercise. For a good, basic interval session, try doing a sprint-walk routine.[15]
Did you know that there are actually four types of exercise, all of which serve varied purposes? Everyone knows that routine exercise is very important for healthy adults for varied functions, including bone and muscle strength, weight-loss or weight maintenance, heart health and even cognitive health. But there are four different types of exercise: Aerobic (or endurance), strength, flexibility and balance.
The “Lying Bicycle” is one of the “gold standards” of abdominal moves according to Marie. “If it’s performed correctly, you will be targeting all areas of your abdominals and core for a tinier, tighter waistline.” To do it: Lie on your back on a mat, placing both hands at the base of your head to lightly support your head and neck (do NOT “yank”). In one continuous motion, bring one knee up to your chest and crunch up angling the opposite elbow towards that knee. Without pausing, alternate while bringing the other elbow up and toward the other knee. Perform this move in a fluid continuous motion without pausing. Count ten reps on each side. Rest and then begin again. Marie says to be sure not to “yank or turn your head,” as this move is done by the abdominals, not your neck. “Crunch up as much as you can throughout the start and finish,” she says. “Extend your legs completely; don’t just ‘cycle’ your feet.”
Pull-ups have become the quintessential move to any CrossFit workout. HOW TO DO IT: To complete a pull-up, start by hanging from a secured bar with your hands in an overhand grip (palm pointing outward, away from your body) and slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. While squeezing your traps together and engaging your abs, pull yourself up to the bar so that your chin passes over. MUSCLES USED: Back, core, shoulders and chest.
You’re only a week into the program, yet you’ll begin to train different bodyparts on different days with a two-day training split (meaning the entire body is trained over the course of two days, rather than one as in the first week). You’ll train a total of four days this week; the split includes two upper-body days (Monday and Thursday) and two lower-body days (Tuesday and Friday), and each bodypart is trained twice. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday will be your recovery days.
Around thirty years ago, Andersen et al. [10] developed a novel exercise model (i.e. one leg dynamic exercise, OLDE) allowing dynamic isotonic contractions of the knee extensor muscles. This exercise model isolates the knee extensor muscles via an active knee extension and passive knee flexion, and due to the reduced muscle mass involved, this exercise is not limited by cardiorespiratory function [11]. Therefore, this model was extensively used to investigate the effect of OLDE on the cardiorespiratory system (e.g. [12]), skeletal muscle physiology (e.g. [13]) but also with patients suffering from cardiorespiratory limitations [14, 15] or for studying mechanisms regulating circulatory response to rhythmic dynamic exercise [6, 16]. More recently, high intensity OLDE has been used to investigate CNS processes involved in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance [8, 11, 17, 18]. Despite being recently used to investigate muscle endurance, the reliability of high intensity OLDE has not been tested. Reliability can be defined as the consistency of a performance measure, and should be established for any new measurement tool [19, 20]. Furthermore, reliability of a protocol can be used to estimate the sample size required for an appropriate statistical power [20]. The main aim of this study was to establish the reliability of high intensity OLDE as a measure of muscle endurance. Additionally, as the sensitivity of a protocol reflects its ability to detect small changes in performance, we also calculated the smallest worthwhile change as a measure of sensitivity [21].
The thruster is a compound movement, meaning that it is a multi-joint movement that works several muscle groups. HOW TO DO IT: The thruster begins in the front rack position across your chest. Squat down, keeping your chest big and knees out. Drive out of the bottom of the hole, similar to a front squat, while driving your knees out. Then use the force you are creating in the squat to drive the bar overhead. Then lock out your arms overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.
VO2peak improved in overweight and obese males (pre and post values in L/min, respectively; W = 3.2 ± 0.6 vs. 3.7 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; O = 3.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6, p = 0.013) as well as in overweight females (2.0 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.4, p < 0.001). VO2peak in the first ventilatory threshold (VT1) increased for all 4 interventions in males (p < 0.05), except for S in the obese group (1.6 ± 0.2 vs. 1.7 ± 0.3, p = 0.141). In females, it increased in E (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.4 ± 0.3, p < 0.001), SE (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.003), and PA (0.9 ± 0.1 vs. 1.2 ± 0.2, p = 0.006) in overweight groups. Time-to-exhaustion improved in all subjects except for females in PA group (15.7 ± 0.3 min vs. 15.9 ± 0.3 min, p = 0.495).
This is the first study that has followed older adults instructed to perform MCT or HIIT over a one-year period, collected data from each exercise session they performed and provided important knowledge about their exercise patterns. This novel information may help researchers and clinicians to develop tailored exercise programs in an ageing population.
11. De Vries N. M., van Ravensberg C. D., Hobbelen J. S. M., Olde Rikkert M. G. M., Staal J. B., Nijhuis-van der Sanden M. W. G. Effects of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults with impaired mobility, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity: a meta-analysis. Ageing Research Reviews. 2012;11(1):136–149. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2011.11.002. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
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