Why do we exercise? We all know it's good for our health, but have you ever thought about it?  Do you exercise the way you do because you've heard that's the way it should be done? Is it possible that the current way of working out could be good for some parts of our body, but bad for others... are we doing more harm than good? Are we spending more time exercising than we need to?

Our objective is to use the information we have gotten and pass it on to you, all in one convenient place so you don’t have to go from site to site trying to find what you’re looking for. We have reviewed three of the top ten workout DVD/video sets that are being purchased by consumers and have detailed what they do, why people like them and what they are saying about them.
Choose 10 different exercises - For cardio, focus on exercises with different levels of intensity. For example, you might alternate a high-intensity exercise (such as jumping jacks or burpees) with an easier move (such as marching in place). For strength training, choose compound exercises such as squats, lunges, pushups and dips to work the entire body. Exercise ideas: Step by Step Cardio Exercises, Step by Step Body Weight Exercises
14.  If you don't feel like working out, don't! Listen to your body. Just because it's your "scheduled day" doesn't mean you must work out. If your body is taking a little longer to recover than usual, so be it. It won't hurt you to lay off for an additional day or two; you will not lose anything you've gained. If your body isn't ready, it's better to skip days than to work out anyway. Every seven days is only a target (some people have found every eight or nine days reap the same benefits).

If you really want to get in shape, why not turn some everyday tasks into exercise opportunities? We know you're lazy, so between your DVD-guided workout sessions, finding ways to incorporate exercise into daily tasks may help to make exercise less of an intimidating, dark, scary monster that looms ahead. Finding room for exercise in your daily life could even make exercise—dare I say it—fun.


Back in mid-century America, you did old-style sit-ups, which were once regarded as the gold standard of iron-gut, military discipline. Maybe they still are, so if your idea of "manly" is messing up your lower back, go for it. But few fitness trainers recommend old-style sit-ups, though there are some re-conceptualized versions of them that might work for you.
You’re also extremely adaptable, so it’s a great time to explore, play, and learn new physical skills. “Younger people can handle new elements in their workouts every few weeks,” says Anderson, who trains teen athletes as well as octogenarians. Strong bones and muscles, fewer injuries, quick recovery, and naturally high levels of anabolic hormones allow you to make faster progress than at any other point in your life.
Ten patients who consulted a sports physician with complaints of underperformance and fatigue participated in the present study. The eight men and two women had an average height and weight of 181±(8) cm and 68.4±(11.8) kg. All subjects were diagnosed by a sports physician according to the latest guidelines for overtraining diagnosis.1 18 A careful history including training history was taken, completed by a physical examination and a blood draw to rule out other possible causes for the complaints. Patients were diagnosed as NFO or OTS retrospectively according to the severity of symptoms and the total duration of symptoms and underperformance (ie, both before and after testing) when no medical explanation for the condition could be found. It turned out that a cutoff of 1-year total duration gave a good distinction between NFO and OTS patients. Demographic data and reported symptoms can be found in table 1. Data of subject 1 are the same as presented in an earlier publication.10 All subjects signed informed consent before participation.

After familiarization, a preliminary OLDE incremental test was performed until exhaustion to measure peak power output. For males, the incremental test started with the isotonic resistance set at 4 N·m (~ 7.4 W) for 1 min, and increased each minute by 3 N·m (~ 4.5 W) to exhaustion. For females, the isotonic resistance was set up at 4 N·m (~ 7.4 W) for 1 min and increased each minute by 2 N·m (~ 3.7 W). Exhaustion was defined as a decrease in cadence below 40 cpm for a duration ≥ 10 s or when the subject voluntarily stopped.
So what's so special about tendon problems and eccentric exercise? It seems that eccentric exercise seems to be helpful to injured tendons. Why? Researchers still do not know why this type of exercise is special. Still, if you have a tendon injury, like Achilees tendonitis, your physical therapist may have you perform eccentric exercises to help treat your condition.

Hold off on buying that gym membership! These workout DVDs are a great alternative for busy women who still want to get toned. Just pop one of these DVDs into your computer or television when you get home and see how much easier it is to integrate working out into your everyday schedule. From yoga to strength training, there's a workout for everyone.


“Everyone can dance! Just embrace your style! And, if it’s for fitness, well, the point is to get you moving, not to be a professional! So, if you’re sweating and having a good time, you’re doing it right!” says Blogilates creator Cassey Ho. In this video, she takes you through a step-by-step, 14-minute dance cardio workout, complete with instructions. This video is great for those who need a bit of extra guidance. After you’ve learned the exercises, you may even be able to take a few of these moves to the floor.
Zumba Fitness-Concert Live. Ever been to a concert and just danced around with abandon? This Zumba video is the next best thing and it’ll count as a workout! In addition to the cardio burn, you’ll feel all the electricity from the crowd during this 70-minute latin dance workout. The video features 16 high-energy, calorie-blasting routines that you can do all at once, or pause and break up into intervals.
“The best exercise you can do if you only have 30 seconds each day is to learn and practice diaphragmatic breathing,” explains Carla Chickedantz, a personal trainer with Crunch gyms. “Diaphragmatic breathing is the most basic, original strength building technique that each and every human uses to build core strength as a newborn baby. As adults, we lose this skill and rely on auxiliary muscles in the chest, shoulders, and neck for respiration. This causes all sorts of problems. During our workouts, we often focus on the front, back and sides of the core, and neglect the top and bottom. Yes, the core is like a canister with the diaphragm at the top and pelvic floor at the bottom.”
The aims of the present study were to assess the reliability of a novel high intensity OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance, and to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. We demonstrated that our novel high intensity OLDE protocol can be used as a reliable measure of muscle endurance, and that isokinetic muscle fatigue recovers and plateaus within ~ 30 s following exhaustion. Therefore, the novel high intensity OLDE protocol tested in this study might provide an interesting tool to investigate muscle fatigue and muscle endurance.
Rest-Pause Sets. The body is an amazing machine, with the right amount of rest it can surprise us with its tenacity. With a weight near your 3 or 5 rep maximum, perform as many reps as possible, then re-rack. Rest for 10 to 15 seconds, then grab it again and go at it. Make sure to keep correct form, and go/rest until you can't budge the bar. Make sure to only do this once.
11. De Vries N. M., van Ravensberg C. D., Hobbelen J. S. M., Olde Rikkert M. G. M., Staal J. B., Nijhuis-van der Sanden M. W. G. Effects of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults with impaired mobility, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity: a meta-analysis. Ageing Research Reviews. 2012;11(1):136–149. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2011.11.002. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
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