I read "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol" back in 2000. Then relatively new to learning about exercise and bodybuilding I found it to be a truly fascinating and very challenging read. Not only was the material challenging in the intellectual sense but also in a philosophical sense. It was turning much of what I believed about "exercise" upside down. So meatheads and gym-rats be warned, "Superslow" is a highly technical book that the typical bodybuilder or exercise enthusiast would find "boring" (see other reviews here on Amazon) because it isn't full of ridiculous promises about gigantic, ripped muscles and marketing jargon for selling supplements. What it is is a very thorough analysis of the variety of benefits one can derive (regardless of their limited genetics) from properly performed exercise and the many proven pitfalls associated with a low-intensity and high workload/volume. The book also provides an in-depth history lesson on the continually evolving refinements to Arthur Jones' Nautilus principles. Hutchins' dogged determination to continually seek a safer and more effective way for people to exercise is admirable and shows his devotion to sound scientific principles.
Insanity: The Asylum is the "sequel" to Insanity, and it pushes you hard, further, deeper in ways that the original Insanity workout wasn't meant to do. I'm going to discuss what to expect in this DVD series, then tell you a little about my results. To give you some perspective, I'm almost 40, and only 2.5 months ago, weighed more than I ever had before (222 pounds). I'm pretty short, so I looked like a man-dumpling. I did insanity (all 63 days, never missed a workout), lost 22 pounds, and then was looking for the next thing to help me keep losing. Fortune struck, and this set came out at just the right time. I segued directly into this series. Here's the story.
I created The Bloom Method with a desire to empower women before, during and after pregnancy. As a Pre & Postnatal Exercise Specialist, Core Rehabilitation Specialist and Pre and Postnatal Holistic Health Coach, I strive to provide women with empowering tools to help support your pregnancy, empower you during birth, prevent common pregnancy-related issues such as Diastasis Recti, Pelvic Floor Incontinence, and Prolapse. My clients that have experienced my methods experience a quicker healing phase post-baby.
Rake those leaves. Raking is already an excellent calorie-burning activity, so do it! Raking is not only great for your yard and lawn, but also for your body. Because your core (your back and abdomen) has to work to stabilize your body while your arms are maneuvering the rake, raking is good exercise for both your arms and core. Weirdly, there's a page all about raking as a workout, which you can read here.
Improving your balance makes you feel steadier on your feet and helps prevent falls. It's especially important as we get older, when the systems that help us maintain balance—our vision, our inner ear, and our leg muscles and joints—tend to break down. "The good news is that training your balance can help prevent and reverse these losses," says Wilson.

I found pound at Crunch Fitness when I lived in LA. You had to sign up for the class ahead of time and they would run out of sticks because the classes were so packed (so I ended up buying my own to bring). The live classes were much more fun than the videos, I think because of the music. At the gym, the instructors would play fun current or popular hit songs really loud. In the videos, it’s more focused on instruction than the music, even though they have options for music only –see below.
If you really want to get in shape, why not turn some everyday tasks into exercise opportunities? We know you're lazy, so between your DVD-guided workout sessions, finding ways to incorporate exercise into daily tasks may help to make exercise less of an intimidating, dark, scary monster that looms ahead. Finding room for exercise in your daily life could even make exercise—dare I say it—fun.
This section outlines the shared characteristics of the six aforementioned MMB pioneers. They all elaborated in length on their philosophy and exercises from a personal perspective, leading to a similar notion that the innate ability to stand and move harmoniously as a normal manner provides multiple advantages. These include physical and mental health, reduced movement-based symptoms, prevention and optimal injury and sickness recovery, enhanced physical performance, retention of the natural human form, and the ability to control the harmonious body rather than acquired movement impairments.
In the fourth and final week of the program, you’ll train four days in a four-way split that hits each bodypart just once (except for calves and abs, which are each trained twice). Four-day splits are common among experienced lifters because they involve training fewer bodyparts (typically 2–3) per workout, which gives each muscle group ample attention and allows you to train with higher volume. As you’ll see, chest and triceps are paired up, as are back with biceps and quads with hamstrings, each a very common pairing among novice and advanced bodybuilders. Shoulders are trained more or less on their own, and you’ll alternate hitting calves and abs—which respond well to being trained multiple times per week—every other workout. No new exercises are introduced in Week 4 so that you can focus on intensity in your workouts instead of learning new movements.
Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow technical manual represents the first major advancement in exercise science since Arthur Jones' Nautilus Bulletins were published back in the early 1970's. Unlike most of the books that have been written on the subject over the past few decades, which are based on assumption and faulty reasoning, Mr. Hutchin's SuperSlow manual presents an exercise protocol based on solid reasoning, and principles logically derived from the classical sciences of biology and mechanical physics, and for the first time provides a proper definition of the word: exercise. I very strongly recommend this book to everyone with an interest in exercise, especially physicians, therapists and exercise instructors, who are looking for a safer, a more time-efficient, and a more productive method of exercise for themselves, their patients or clients. SuperSlow is not just better than other exercise protocols, it is so far superior to every other activity ever devised for the purpose of physical conditioning that no meaningful comparison is even possible. This is the future of exercise.
The bench press or dumbbell bench-press is performed while lying face up on a bench, by pushing a weight away from the chest. This is a compound exercise that also involves the triceps and the front deltoids, also recruits the upper and lower back muscles, and traps. The bench press is the king of all upper body exercises and is one of the most popular chest exercises in the world. It is the final exercise in 'The big 3'.
Natalie Jill is a very popular fitness trainer who you will see guest starring on some of the other sites and channels found in this list. Her best videos can be found on her personal fitness blog which shares workouts for weight loss, exercise ball routines, jump rope workouts, booty belt workouts, body weight exercises and more. Natalie also shares great healthy recipes and useful nutrition tips on her site.

The practice of the MMB methods is generally emphasized in three areas. Firstly, human movement is achieved with involvement of a centrally controlled dynamic synergy between the body’s stability and mobility movement elements.61 Hoffman J, Gabel P. Expanding Panjabi’s stability model to express movement: A theoretical model. Med Hypotheses. 2013;80(6):692–7.10.1016/j.mehy.2013.02.006[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] This ensures all the muscles of the body concurrently employ or counter movement forces which results in visible harmonious movements. Secondly, functionality is required as the MMB is aimed at correct natural movements that reflect the requirements of activity and life in the modern world. Consequently, non-functional movements are unjustified as an MMB exercise. Thirdly, learning of MMB exercises requires a cognitive focus on achieving harmonious functional movements. With practice, the cognitive learning process enables an automatic and harmonious physical performance, making the exercises as well as everyday tasks easier, safer, and more efficient. The MMB exercises were intended by their creators to be healthy and enjoyable, a cultural alternative to the practice of aggressively overtraining the body and accepting pain and injury as normal components of sport.

Back in mid-century America, you did old-style sit-ups, which were once regarded as the gold standard of iron-gut, military discipline. Maybe they still are, so if your idea of "manly" is messing up your lower back, go for it. But few fitness trainers recommend old-style sit-ups, though there are some re-conceptualized versions of them that might work for you.
Publications, establishment recognition, and public support followed the success. In 1932, Fairbairn was elected President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.31 Fairbairn JS. Obituary. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 1944;51:152–6.10.1111/bjo.1944.51.issue-2[Crossref] [Google Scholar] In 1936, Morris (in collaboration with Randell) published ‘Maternity and Post-Operative Exercises,’ that illustrated exercises for pregnant and puerperal women and those who had been operated on. The book emphasized breathing, relaxation, conscious training of the pelvic floor muscles, and re-establishing good posture.32 Morris M. Maternity and post-operative exercises. London: Heinemann; 1936. [Google Scholar] A year later, Morris published ‘Basic Physical Training’ for the general public, dedicated to ‘all those who, realising the inter-dependence of mental and physical well-being, are working to raise the standard of health.’33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] In 1939, Randell published her seminal textbook ‘Training for Childbirth - From the Mothers Point of View’ which described her philosophy in detail with related anatomy and pathology and exercise descriptions and instructions.25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] This was followed up in 1949 with ‘Fearless Childbirth’, a practical manual for mothers-to-be.34 Randell M. Fearless childhood. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1953. [Google Scholar]
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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