I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.
My husband ordered this program several months ago and I was, of course, skeptical. But, being sick of our current workout programs and seeing as it was only going to take 4 minutes, what did I have to lose? We tried it...and we LOVE it. There is about a 2 min warm-up routine you are supposed to do before each workout, then a rotating schedule of 4-min, muscle tiring, heart pumping workouts. You wouldn't think that 4 minutes could really do anything, but time has proven otherwise. After only a couple months of doing the workouts as a family, we are seeing great results. I've got a nice set of pipes, my stomach is flatter and I'm up to a 4-pack...hoping I'll get to that 6-pack before the end of the year, my rear, legs and waistline are trimmer and more firm. My ... full review
Remember, the real trick to getting stronger is to progressively move more and more weight, so keep in mind that these tricks and tips are meant to supplement that goal Fundamentals of resistance training: progression and exercise prescription. Kraemer, W.J., Ratamess, M.A. Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA; MEdicine and Science in Sports and Exercise; 2004 Apr;36(4):674-88.. Try out some new techniques and bulldoze that training plateau like a beast. Have you tried any of these techniques? What techniques help you build strength? Tell us in the comments below!
Perhaps one of the best benefits of barre is that it’s fun! It incorporates the use of upbeat music and engaging choreography. When working out is fun and enjoyable, your chances of staying with the program greatly increase. The barre method also offers quick results. Barre helps strengthen and tone your muscles without increasing bulk, and it improves your posture. It also increases cardiovascular endurance and metabolism, which helps to quickly burn calories.

Rather than doing your meetings over coffee, why don’t you invite people to go for a walking meeting? Steve Jobs, Winston Churchill and many U.S. Presidents have been huge advocates of this practice for both health and camaraderie purposes. Even if you’re just taking a phone call, use it as an opportunity to take a walk around the block or to your next destination.
Anaerobic exercise differs from aerobic exercise in that it is comprised by short bursts of a high-intensity activity such as that repeated during strength training. While aerobic exercise uses oxygen for fuel (an early definition of aerobic is, after all, "living only in the presence of oxygen"), anaerobic exercise draws its fuel from carbohydrates. Anaerobic exercise also produces lactic acid, unlike aerobic exercise. To get started with some anaerobic exercises, check out this list of anaerobic exercises you can do anywhere. While anaerobic exercise does not burn as many calories as aerobic exercise burns, it will still help to improve respiratory and cardiovascular fitness. Additionally, because anaerobic exercise depletes energy more quickly than the blood can replenish the muscles' oxygen, the body's anaerobic metabolism kicks in, burning glucose as fuel. Even after the the anaerobic activity has stopped, the metabolism remains increased for up to several hours. If anaerobic exercise is repeated often, it will even have an effect on your resting metabolic rate. This will cause your body to burn more calories in general—even when you're sleeping.
Do you even lift, bro? While putting away groceries, do bicep curls with cans, bottles, or other objects. You can also try holding these objects above your head for ten seconds before putting them away. Alternately, when grocery shopping, opt for a basket instead of a cart when you can. You'll be working out your upper body without even thinking about it.
Jump up ^ Reed, Jennifer L; Prince, Stephanie A; Cole, Christie A; Fodor, J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Tulloch, Heather E; Wright, Erica; Reid, Robert D (19 December 2014). "Workplace physical activity interventions and moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity levels among working-age women: a systematic review protocol". Systematic Reviews. 3 (1): 147. doi:10.1186/2046-4053-3-147. PMC 4290810. PMID 25526769.
This is the first review to have focused on exercise as an add-on strategy in the treatment of MDD. Our findings corroborate some previous observations that were based on few studies and which were difficult to generalize.41,51,73,92,93 Given the results of the present article, it seems that exercise might be an effective strategy to enhance the antidepressant effect of medication treatments. Moreover, we hypothesize that the main role of exercise on treatment-resistant depression is in inducing neurogenesis by increasing BDNF expression, as was demonstrated by several recent studies.
In the third week of the program we step it up to a three-day training split: Train all “pushing” bodyparts (chest, shoulders, triceps) on Day 1; hit the “pulling” bodyparts (back, biceps) and abs on Day 2; and work your lower body (quads, glutes, hamstrings, calves) on Day 3. As in Week 2, you train each bodypart twice a week, so you’ll hit the gym six days this week.
The Bloom Method is a unique system that is based on solid evidence compiled by our founder through her years of working individually with thousands of women in pregnancy, early post birth and well into motherhood. The Bloom Method combines cutting edge-core techniques, breathing practices, functional [mom] movements, strength training, Lagree [pilates] based moves, HiiT [for postnatal moms] and groundbreaking philosophies into one life-changing exercise method. 
Jane Fonda’s Original Workout. The original. The classic. The one and only. Jane Fonda! Throwback your fitness routine (and break out the leg warmers!) with a workout video from this ‘80s exercise genius. Fonda will take you through aerobics, strength, and flexibility movements with options for beginners and advanced. The video is available for $9.99.
Jump up ^ Zhou Y, Zhao M, Zhou C, Li R (July 2015). "Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: From human to animal studies". Front. Neuroendocrinol. 40: 24–41. doi:10.1016/j.yfrne.2015.07.001. PMC 4712120. PMID 26182835. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that exercise may serve as a substitute or competition for drug abuse by changing ΔFosB or cFos immunoreactivity in the reward system to protect against later or previous drug use. ... As briefly reviewed above, a large number of human and rodent studies clearly show that there are sex differences in drug addiction and exercise. The sex differences are also found in the effectiveness of exercise on drug addiction prevention and treatment, as well as underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The postulate that exercise serves as an ideal intervention for drug addiction has been widely recognized and used in human and animal rehabilitation. ... In particular, more studies on the neurobiological mechanism of exercise and its roles in preventing and treating drug addiction are needed.
Ten patients who consulted a sports physician with complaints of underperformance and fatigue participated in the present study. The eight men and two women had an average height and weight of 181±(8) cm and 68.4±(11.8) kg. All subjects were diagnosed by a sports physician according to the latest guidelines for overtraining diagnosis.1 18 A careful history including training history was taken, completed by a physical examination and a blood draw to rule out other possible causes for the complaints. Patients were diagnosed as NFO or OTS retrospectively according to the severity of symptoms and the total duration of symptoms and underperformance (ie, both before and after testing) when no medical explanation for the condition could be found. It turned out that a cutoff of 1-year total duration gave a good distinction between NFO and OTS patients. Demographic data and reported symptoms can be found in table 1. Data of subject 1 are the same as presented in an earlier publication.10 All subjects signed informed consent before participation.

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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