Athletic trainers and physical therapists play important roles in the management of individuals with RCIS. When caring for this patient population, an athletic trainer or physical therapist performs a comprehensive initial examination. Information obtained from the examination is used, in part, to (1) identify impairments believed to be contributing to the individual's pain and functional limitations and (2) develop an impairment-based rehabilitation program. We believe that the prescription of specific evidence-based interventions designed to address the relevant contributory factors might be more appropriate than administering the same exercise program to everyone with RCIS. Ideally, individuals with RCIS would be classified into impairment-based subgroups and prescribed interventions specific to that subgroup. Although no treatment classification for patients with RCIS exists, this approach has been used to treat individuals with low back pain and has resulted in superior outcomes when compared with a general treatment approach.2
You’ve been cleared to exercise but now what? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Our expert guidance will provide you with the foundational strength needed to get you feeling like yourself again while adding an angle of rehabilitative care to re-connect, heal, & re-strengthen your postpartum body. We will safely progress you through exercises that are meant to challenge your body and stimulate your mind while gearing you up to be the strong mom you’re aiming to be. We guarantee that with our training, your fitness regimen will be more effective than ever before.

One of the beautiful things about yoga is that you can do it anywhere, anytime. (Even in the middle of a desert, as this video proves.) But sometimes you need some instruction to get through an entire sequence. That’s where Tara Stiles comes in. The New York City-based yogi teaches a full flow class in this excellent 50-minute video (one of the best YouTube workouts, in our opinion). Her detailed, easy-to-follow instructions make it seem as though you’re working one-on-one with her, and by the end of it, you’ve had a super solid yoga experience.


There are TONS of exercise videos on the market today and trying to decide which ones are good and which ones will just end up on the shelf unused. The three exercise video sets featured here are all on the top ten lists on review sites and customers love them. While they may not be good for every fitness level, they are challenging, they bring results and users love them.
Strength conditioning. Start by doing one set of exercises targeting each of the major muscle groups. Bryant suggests using a weight at which you can comfortably perform the exercise eight to 12 times in a set. When you think you can handle more, gradually increase either the weight, the number of repetitions, or number of sets. To maximize the benefits, do strength training at least twice a week. Never work the same body part two days in a row.
Recruiting lasted 6 months starting from September 2013. Participants were recruited by means of family doctors to whom the goal of the study was explained. The recruitment flow chart is shown in Figure 1. Three hundred and fifty people aged ≥ 65 were invited to participate. Of these, 51.4% agreed to be included in the screening list while 48.6% refused to participate, mainly for family reasons such as illness/hospitalization/old age of a family member. Forty people were found eligible to participate in the research protocol. Randomly, twenty were assigned to VE and twenty to the control group. The latter were instructed not to take part in any physical activity throughout the study period. All the selected participants signed an informed consent. The study was performed according to the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the local ethics committee on September 23, 2013.
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