Jump up ^ Blondell SJ, Hammersley-Mather R, Veerman JL (May 2014). "Does physical activity prevent cognitive decline and dementia?: A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies". BMC Public Health. 14: 510. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-510. PMC 4064273. PMID 24885250. Longitudinal observational studies show an association between higher levels of physical activity and a reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. A case can be made for a causal interpretation. Future research should use objective measures of physical activity, adjust for the full range of confounders and have adequate follow-up length. Ideally, randomised controlled trials will be conducted. ... On the whole the results do, however, lend support to the notion of a causal relationship between physical activity, cognitive decline and dementia, according to the established criteria for causal inference.
One hundred and sixty-seven subjects (77 males and 90 females), aged 18–50 years, performed a modified Bruce protocol before (pre) and after (post) a weight loss program of 24 weeks. This program combined physical training (strength, S; endurance, E; combined strength + endurance, SE; or physical activity recommendation, PA) 3 times per week, with a 25%–30% caloric restriction diet.
Developing research has demonstrated that many of the benefits of exercise are mediated through the role of skeletal muscle as an endocrine organ. That is, contracting muscles release multiple substances known as myokines which promote the growth of new tissue, tissue repair, and multiple anti-inflammatory functions, which in turn reduce the risk of developing various inflammatory diseases.[114] Exercise reduces levels of cortisol, which causes many health problems, both physical and mental.[115] Endurance exercise before meals lowers blood glucose more than the same exercise after meals.[116] There is evidence that vigorous exercise (90–95% of VO2 max) induces a greater degree of physiological cardiac hypertrophy than moderate exercise (40 to 70% of VO2 max), but it is unknown whether this has any effects on overall morbidity and/or mortality.[117] Both aerobic and anaerobic exercise work to increase the mechanical efficiency of the heart by increasing cardiac volume (aerobic exercise), or myocardial thickness (strength training). Ventricular hypertrophy, the thickening of the ventricular walls, is generally beneficial and healthy if it occurs in response to exercise.

Video Abstract for the ESSR 46.4 article “Modulation of Energy Expenditure by Estrogens and Exercise in Women” from authors Kathleen M. Gavin, Wendy M. Kohrt, Dwight J. Klemm, and Edward L. Melanson. Reducing estrogen in women results in decreases in energy expenditure, but the mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. We postulate that the loss of estrogens in women is associated with increased accumulation of bone marrow–derived adipocytes in white adipose tissue, decreased activity of brown adipose tissue, and reduced levels of physical activity. Regular exercise may counteract the effects of estrogen deficiency.
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Founder Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow has been 'managed' by unscrupulous business partners, into a commercial entity bearing little resemblance to his original intention, (& no involvement with Mr Hutchins himself, nor any of his original associates). The -real- SS was revolutionary for its time, but Hutchins' new textbook, "The Renaissance of Exercise, a Vitruvian Adventure", is the result of his ongoing refinements over the past 18 years. Rather than pay over a $150 for the supposed historic value of a slim, soft-cover, dog-eared $10 book & it's relatively primitive ideas, get the new hard-cover textbook./It seems that one of the main criticisms os The Manual is "too much information". True, for a casual reader.The fact is, ANY exercise protocol is simple enough to write up on one or two pages: How many sets. How many reps. How many exercises. How often. About 10 exercise technique descriptions: Done. It's the precise whys, hows, & special cases that take a book to fulfill.
One way repeated ANOVAs (time: isotime from first to seventh minute and exhaustion) were used to test the time course of EMG RMS for all muscles, leg RPE, leg muscle pain and heart rate. Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (1st minute vs other time points, exhaustion vs other time points) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction.
Instructor Inés Aaranós leads this full 30-minute Zumba dance session on the beach. You might want to practice a few basic Zumba moves before diving into this full-length video, however. It’s fast-paced and without any breaks, leaving you no time to fall behind. It’s also cardio-intensive, but does feature some bodyweight strength moves to provide you with a well-rounded workout. Complete this routine a few times and see how you improve.
In an earlier study, we found that in order to detect signs of OTS and distinguish them from normal training responses or FO, this method may be a good indicator not only of the recovery capacity of the athlete but also of the ability to normally perform the second bout of exercise.10 The test could, therefore, be used as an indirect measure of hypothalamic–pituitary capacity. It was hypothesised that on the NFO–OTS continuum, a hypersensitivity of the pituitary is followed by an insensitivity or exhaustion afterwards.10 22 Results from the present study confirm this hypothesis. The NFO athletes showed a very high response to the second exercise bout, at least in ACTH and PRL, whereas the OTS athletes showed suppression.
1) The biggest critique I have is that transitions from poses are too aggressive and, in many cases, FAR too quick. This could very easily result in stabilizer injury with those healing from core, back, spine or neck injuries or those who don't have the best core strength to begin with. The example that comes to mind is in the 'Sweat" workout. The rapid change from low lunge into a one-foot balanced runner caused an injury for me the first week, and just again today after 6 weeks. If you have ANY history of car crash with spinal involvement, low back problems, abdominal surgery, or core weakness, you MUST listen to your body carefully during these workouts. The modifications are helpful, but they simply decrease the impact of the position once you are in them. The quick transitions in PiYO keep heart rates up, but they also jeopardize the safety of joints or muscles that are a) fatigued from participating and b) unstable due to weakness. Adapt and SLOW DOWN when needed. Better to do 2 sets safely than 4 sets and getting hurt.

Want to target the upper back without a reformer? Lie face down on a mat with your feet together. Raise your head and chest slightly, and extend your arms perpendicular to your body, palms down. Exhale and sweep the arms back as you lift your chin and chest higher. Keep your waist on the mat and use your upper back muscles to bring your arms closer to your body. Return to starting position. Do five reps.
The main aim of this study was to test the reliability of a novel OLDE protocol performed at high intensity (workload fixed at 85% peak power output [22]). Isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery up to 40 s post exercise were also measured. Subjects visited the laboratory on four different days. During the first visit, subjects were familiarized with the OLDE protocol (see One Leg Dynamic Exercise for more details), and performed after 30 min recovery an incremental test to measure peak power output. After 30 min recovery following the incremental test, subjects were familiarized with neuromuscular testing (see Neuromuscular Function Tests for more details) and the time to exhaustion test. As suggested by Andersen et al. [10], torque and electromyographic (EMG) feedback were used to ensure a quick and reliable familiarization to the novel OLDE protocol. Each of the following three visits (reliability sessions) consisted of completion of the time to exhaustion test with neuromuscular testing pre and post-exercise. An overview of these three sessions can be seen in Fig 1.
The Bloom Method promises to always provide you with the most innovative tools to stay connected to your body as it changes, better prepare you for childbirth, and promote a speedy recovery helping you to achieve your post-birth goals. Our team of experts is constantly staying up to date on the most informative education + studies to ensure that what we provide is top-notch.
Children who participate in physical exercise experience greater loss of body fat and increased cardiovascular fitness.[23] Studies have shown that academic stress in youth increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in later years; however, these risks can be greatly decreased with regular physical exercise.[24] There is a dose-response relation between the amount of exercise performed from approximately 700–2000 kcal of energy expenditure per week and all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality in middle-aged and elderly populations. The greatest potential for reduced mortality is in the sedentary who become moderately active. Studies have shown that since heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, regular exercise in aging women leads to healthier cardiovascular profiles. Most beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular disease mortality can be attained through moderate-intensity activity (40–60% of maximal oxygen uptake, depending on age). Persons who modify their behavior after myocardial infarction to include regular exercise have improved rates of survival. Persons who remain sedentary have the highest risk for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.[25] According to the American Heart Association, exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases, including heart attack and stroke.[22]
Resistance bands serve as another space and equipment saver. These elastic bands typically have handles on the end, and you can perform a variety of exercises with them. If you'd like to increase the intensity and resistance, you can use two bands at once. Surgical tubing makes and extremely inexpensive resistance band, provided you create a safe way to hold onto the ends so that you don't accidentally let go.

Stuck in the strength training doldrums? Our best piece of fitness advice is that "Variety is key." Greatist has shared all sorts of ways to take workouts from "hum drum" to "hot stuff." We're now turning our eye to eight effective strength training techniques. So grab that workout log and a pen, because here are some great ways to challenge the status quo and add a little variety to the normal gym routine.
This stands for rate of perceived exertion, and refers to intensity. It’s a point of reference that trainers often use to communicate how hard you should be working since what feels easy or challenging is different for everyone. On the RPE scale a 1 pretty much means zero effort while a 10 means you’re working harder than you thought you possibly could.
Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow technical manual represents the first major advancement in exercise science since Arthur Jones' Nautilus Bulletins were published back in the early 1970's. Unlike most of the books that have been written on the subject over the past few decades, which are based on assumption and faulty reasoning, Mr. Hutchin's SuperSlow manual presents an exercise protocol based on solid reasoning, and principles logically derived from the classical sciences of biology and mechanical physics, and for the first time provides a proper definition of the word: exercise. I very strongly recommend this book to everyone with an interest in exercise, especially physicians, therapists and exercise instructors, who are looking for a safer, a more time-efficient, and a more productive method of exercise for themselves, their patients or clients. SuperSlow is not just better than other exercise protocols, it is so far superior to every other activity ever devised for the purpose of physical conditioning that no meaningful comparison is even possible. This is the future of exercise.
4. Ken Hutchins never advocated working your heart to failure and does NOT disregard cardiovascular fitness. A typical Super Slow workout is maybe 15 minutes of constant, demanding work done in 20-25 minutes of total time. You will finish breathing hard with your pulse pounding. It is the ultimate cardiovascular circuit exercise routine, much more time efficient and less damaging to your joints than jogging or other aerobic exercise.
Jump up ^ Tarumi T, Zhang R (January 2014). "Cerebral hemodynamics of the aging brain: risk of Alzheimer disease and benefit of aerobic exercise". Front Physiol. 5: 6. doi:10.3389/fphys.2014.00006. PMC 3896879. PMID 24478719. Exercise-related improvements in brain function and structure may be conferred by the concurrent adaptations in vascular function and structure. Aerobic exercise increases the peripheral levels of growth factors (e.g., BDNF, IFG-1, and VEGF) which cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and stimulate neurogenesis and angiogenesis (Trejo et al., 2001; Lee et al., 2002; Fabel et al., 2003; Lopez-Lopez et al., 2004). Consistent with this, exercise-related enlargement of hippocampus was accompanied by increases in cerebral blood volume and capillary densities (Pereira et al., 2007). Enhanced cerebral perfusion may not only facilitate the delivery of energy substrates, but also lower the risk of vascular-related brain damages, including WMH and silent infarct (Tseng et al., 2013). Furthermore, regular aerobic exercise is associated with lower levels of Aβ deposition in individuals with APOE4 positive (Head et al., 2012), which may also reduce the risk of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microbleeds (Poels et al., 2010).
Jump up ^ Reed, Jennifer L; Prince, Stephanie A; Cole, Christie A; Fodor, J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Mullen, Kerri-Anne; Tulloch, Heather E; Wright, Erica; Reid, Robert D (19 December 2014). "Workplace physical activity interventions and moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity levels among working-age women: a systematic review protocol". Systematic Reviews. 3 (1): 147. doi:10.1186/2046-4053-3-147. PMC 4290810. PMID 25526769.
Jump up ^ Gomez-Pinilla F, Hillman C (January 2013). "The influence of exercise on cognitive abilities". Compr. Physiol. 3 (1): 403–428. doi:10.1002/cphy.c110063. ISBN 9780470650714. PMC 3951958. PMID 23720292. Abundant research in the last decade has shown that exercise is one of the strongest promoters of neurogenesis in the brain of adult rodents (97, 102) and humans (1,61), and this has introduced the possibility that proliferating neurons could contribute to the cognitive enhancement observed with exercise. In addition to BDNF, the actions of IGF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (54) are considered essential for the angiogenic and neurogenic effects of exercise in the brain. Although the action of exercise on brain angiogenesis has been known for many years (10), it is not until recently that neurovascular adaptations in the hippocampus have been associated with cognitive function (29). Exercise enhances the proliferation of brain endothelial cells throughout the brain (113), hippocampal IGF gene expression (47), and serum levels of both IGF (178) and VEGF (63). IGF-1 and VEGF, apparently produced in the periphery, support exercise induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as corroborated by blocking the effects of exercise using antibodies against IGF-1 (47) or VEGF (63).
If the proliferation of many websites on the subject (not to mention the co-worker who won't let you forget he does CrossFit, bro) are any indication, the first rule of CrossFit is never stop talking about CrossFit. And while this would seem to encourage certainty about what CrossFit actually is, there are a lot of myths and generalizations to clear up about the workout regimen.
In both groups, men had a higher proportion of cycling, cross-country skiing and jogging sessions compared to women (Fig. 4). Men also had a higher proportion of sessions with combined endurance and resistance training and domestic activities than women. In contrast, women had a higher proportion of walking, swimming and dancing sessions than men. There were no sex differences in resistance training and other types of endurance training (Fig. 4).
One of the beautiful things about yoga is that you can do it anywhere, anytime. (Even in the middle of a desert, as this video proves.) But sometimes you need some instruction to get through an entire sequence. That’s where Tara Stiles comes in. The New York City-based yogi teaches a full flow class in this excellent 50-minute video (one of the best YouTube workouts, in our opinion). Her detailed, easy-to-follow instructions make it seem as though you’re working one-on-one with her, and by the end of it, you’ve had a super solid yoga experience.

The Bloom Method is a unique system that is based on solid evidence compiled by our founder through her years of working individually with thousands of women in pregnancy, early post birth and well into motherhood. The Bloom Method combines cutting edge-core techniques, breathing practices, functional [mom] movements, strength training, Lagree [pilates] based moves, HiiT [for postnatal moms] and groundbreaking philosophies into one life-changing exercise method. 
Stephanie Mansour, weight loss and lifestyle coach for women, has a great way to get your triceps toned while you’re watching TV. Just do 30 tricep dips on your couch. Here’s how: “Hands on edge of couch, fingers facing you. Bend your knees at 90-degree angle, scooting your butt up so it almost touches the couch,” she says. “Bend at the elbows, lower your body down, then press back up and straighten your arms. Repeat for 30 seconds to work on arm flab.”
The simplest way to workout at home is to use your own body. There are a variety of effective body weight exercises that can help you build strength, endurance and burn calories. The downside is that, without added resistance, it's tough to work hard enough to really challenge your body and burn calories. One way around that problem? Circuit training. By going from one exercise to the next, without little or no rest, you keep your heart rate up, burn more calories and get the most out of your exercise time.

If your immune system is constantly fighting both its internal and external environment, it can be more challenging to live, work and exercise with the greater cognitive dysfunction, headaches, allergies, tender lymph nodes and both joint and muscle pain.  Yes, I do get it. However, I want you to be successful. Living myself with M.E, and lyme co-infections, the right approach is essential to making exercise work for us, not against us. 
After trying many different workout "schemes" with limited success, I bought this book and began doing Super Slow workouts. I'm now working out 6 times a month, spending less than 30 minutes in the gym for each workout, and I'm stronger than I've ever been. I've never experienced progress like this before. At 45 years old, my leg press has gone from 400 to 820 lbs. in a couple of months. The workouts aren't easy, but they're over quickly, and I'm able to spend more time with my family without feeling like I'm compromisng my health and fitness.
One way repeated ANOVA was used to compare time to exhaustion between sessions (S1, S2 and S3). Relative reliability was calculated with the intraclass correlation (ICC) model (3, 1) [27]. Absolute reliability was calculated with the typical error of measurement (the standard deviation of the change scores divided by  [28, 29]). Bland and Altman’s 95% limits of agreement were also used (calculated for S1 vs S2, S1 vs S3 and S2 vs S3) as an additional representation of measurement error and to identify the presence of heteroscedasticity [19]. As data were heteroscedastic, both raw data and log transformed Bland and Altman’s plots are presented. Limit of agreement ratio (LOA) was also calculated from the log transformed data as follow: LOA = (1.96 × SDdiff / grand mean) × 100; where “SDdiff” represents the SD of the differences between tests (S1 vs S2, S1 vs S3, S2 vs S3) and “grand mean” represents (mean S1 + mean S2 + mean S3)/3. As time to exhaustion data were heteroscedastic, we also calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for each subject as follow: CV = 100×(SD of the three measurements)/(mean of the three measurements). Mean CV for all subjects were also calculated. We also calculated the smallest worthwhile change (0.2 × between subjects SD) [21].

In line with the previous literature, our study showed that walking was the most common exercise type among older adults [24, 25]. This result is not surprising as walking is among the most cost effective and accessible means of exercise [26]. In addition, walking has been identified as a relatively safe exercise alternative to older adults [25]. We found that walking was the most common exercise type in both training groups. However, the MCT group had a higher proportion of walking sessions than the HIIT group, while the HIIT group had a higher proportion of sessions with for instance jogging and cycling. This might indicate that some older adults in the HIIT group feel that it is easier to achieve a high-intensity level when performing jogging and cycling compared to walking. Absolute workload at a given intensity varies greatly among individuals with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) [27], so that e.g. walking at 5 km/h corresponds to moderate intensity for an individual with relatively high CRF level, while the same speed exhibits near-maximal intensity for an individual with low CRF. Therefore, the type of exercise an individual need to perform in order to achieve a feeling of high intensity varies from one individual to another [27]. Since ageing often results in CRF decline [28], it is likely that many older adults will reach a feeling of high-intensity when walking. However, those with a high CRF level might need to perform other exercise types, for instance jogging and cycling, to reach the same intensity level during their workout session.
The mental benefits of barre are similar to yoga and Pilates, as it effectively increases mind-body awareness and mental clarity. Focus and concentration are required to perform the small precise movements utilized in barre. Allowing your mind to concentrate solely on your technique increases feelings of relaxation and decreases stress levels. Endorphins released during physical activity increase your general sense of well-being.
Chase Squires is the first to admit that he's no fitness expert. But he is a guy who used to weigh 205 pounds, more than was healthy for his 5'4" frame. "In my vacation pictures in 2002, I looked like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man at the beach," says the 42-year-old Colorado resident. Squires decided enough was enough, cut out fatty food, and started walking on a treadmill. The pounds came off and soon he was running marathons -- not fast, but in the race. He ran his first 50-mile race in October 2003 and completed his first 100-miler a year later. Since then, he's completed several 100-mile, 50-mile, and 50k races.
The practice of the MMB methods is generally emphasized in three areas. Firstly, human movement is achieved with involvement of a centrally controlled dynamic synergy between the body’s stability and mobility movement elements.61 Hoffman J, Gabel P. Expanding Panjabi’s stability model to express movement: A theoretical model. Med Hypotheses. 2013;80(6):692–7.10.1016/j.mehy.2013.02.006[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] This ensures all the muscles of the body concurrently employ or counter movement forces which results in visible harmonious movements. Secondly, functionality is required as the MMB is aimed at correct natural movements that reflect the requirements of activity and life in the modern world. Consequently, non-functional movements are unjustified as an MMB exercise. Thirdly, learning of MMB exercises requires a cognitive focus on achieving harmonious functional movements. With practice, the cognitive learning process enables an automatic and harmonious physical performance, making the exercises as well as everyday tasks easier, safer, and more efficient. The MMB exercises were intended by their creators to be healthy and enjoyable, a cultural alternative to the practice of aggressively overtraining the body and accepting pain and injury as normal components of sport.

The bent-over row is performed while leaning over, holding a weight hanging down in one hand or both hands, by pulling it up towards the abdomen. This is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. The torso is unsupported in some variants of this exercise, in which case lifting belts are often used to help support the lower back.
Improving your balance makes you feel steadier on your feet and helps prevent falls. It's especially important as we get older, when the systems that help us maintain balance—our vision, our inner ear, and our leg muscles and joints—tend to break down. "The good news is that training your balance can help prevent and reverse these losses," says Wilson.
During your workout you have “target” heart rate zones that are expressed as a percentage of your max heart rate. For low-intensity cardio, you want to aim for 60 to 70 percent of your max heart rate, for moderate-intensity cardio the goal is 70 to 85 percent, and for high-intensity cardio, 85 percent or above. This can help you see if you’re really working as hard as you think you are and adjust as needed to make sure you’re hitting your workout goals. Here’s how to calculate your max and target heart rate zones.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.2 article “Joint Loading in Runners Does Not Initiate Knee Osteoarthritis” from author Ross H Miller. Runners do not have a greater prevalence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) than non-runners. The hypothesis that joint loads in running do not cause OA is forwarded. Two mechanisms are proposed: 1) cumulative load, which is surprisingly low in running, is more important for OA risk than peak load, and 2) running conditions cartilage to withstand the mechanical stresses of running.
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In 1912, Alexander claimed that the principles of ‘conscious control’ constitute an unfailing remedy for disease, including the cases of shortening of the spine, an injured arm, and a golfer who is practicing his swing.21 Pilates and Alexander [Internet]. Macy JA. Alexander Technique and the Pilates method of movement re-education: A biomechanical perspective. 2010 Dec 6 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pilatesandalexander.com/articles/macy/. [Google Scholar] Alexander was against weightlifting, claiming that their focus on isolating muscles did not address the short- and long-term damage of impaired functional movements: ‘The physical body thus had two existences ... one fiercely active, muscular, dynamic, the other sedentary, nervous, static.’21 Pilates and Alexander [Internet]. Macy JA. Alexander Technique and the Pilates method of movement re-education: A biomechanical perspective. 2010 Dec 6 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pilatesandalexander.com/articles/macy/. [Google Scholar] He allied himself with the turn of the 20th century MMB movement emergence:20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar]
There are many ways to do a handstand push-up. One starts in the handstand position against a wall. HOW TO DO IT: To complete this movement, lower your body to the ground so that your head touches the ground (or mat) below. Then, push yourself away from the ground into a handstand. You can also kip this so that your lower body helps drive the upper body. This can be done by bringing your knees to your chest while you lower your head toward the ground. Then, kick up to the sky as you push off of the ground with your hands. The two forces combine to bring you back to the beginning handstand position. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, core and triceps.

It's hard to pinpoint the first time exercise appeared visually on-screen—meaning on film or video, something that you could see, as opposed to hear—but one of the earliest is the 1928 film Exercise: A Film Lesson in Health and Hygiene. It isn't exactly instructional, but features a bunch of boy scouts showing off some rather bizarre group exercise routines. Check out the bit that starts around 1:22, where they ride each other like human chariots. Anyhow, this film is significant in that its primary purpose is to display and broadcast forms of exercise to an audience, and it seems to be the first to have done so.
We’ve gone on the record with our love of MMA conditioning exercises, and that’s why we bookmarked this video. Even the warm-up is jam-packed with explosive movements that’ll get your heart pumping (think high knees and walking front kicks). And once you move into the actual workout, you’re in for even more high-energy exercises, like hopping front kicks, that are sure to condition your body from head to toe.
"Consider this: Dr. Kenneth Cooper (author of Aerobics, The New Aerobics, Aerobics for Women), the U.S. Air Force Cardiologist who coined the term 'aerobics" (meaning a form of exercise) and has promoted their use for over 25 years, now admits that he was wrong! According to Dr. Cooper, further research has shown that there is no correlation between aerobic endurance performance and health, longevity, or protection against heart disease. He will admit, however, that such activities do carry with them a great risk of injury. Further, he admits that gross-overuse activities such as running are damaging to the body." – Ken Hutchins, SuperSlow Exercise Guild
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