YouTube [Internet]. Huntly Film Archives. German fitness. (1930's). 2014 Oct 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://youtu.be/KjObalYKTHE.  The fatal blow to traditional Physical Culture in gymnasium clubs occurred at the turn of the 20th century when the new bodybuilding exercise force emerged and dramatically superseded the entire gymnasium floor space.12 Beckwith KA. Building Strength. Alan Calvert, the Milo bar-bell company, and the modernization of American weight training; PhD thesis. Austin: The University of Texas; 2006. [Google Scholar] This forced both traditional Physical Culture systems to require new professional establishments. Competitive athletes and gymnasts started training under ‘The International Gymnastics Federation’ (established in 1881)13 International Gymnastic Federation (FIG) [Internet]. History of gymnastics. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fig-gymnastics.com/site/about/federation/history. [Google Scholar] and within the ‘International Olympic Committee’ (established in 1894).14 The Olympic Museum [Internet]. The modern Olympic games. 2014 Dec 16 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.olympic.org/Assets/TOM_2013/Visit/Schools/TOM_teaching_list/ENG_The_Modern_Olympic.pdf. [Google Scholar] Concurrently, mind–body enthusiasts migrated to new independent schools, in which pioneers could express their opinions freely and gain popular following. Between 1890 and 1925, at least six new MMB schools emerged, sharing a similar exercise philosophy and practicing similar exercises. These methods, which are the focus of this paper, were led by six charismatic pioneers: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris.
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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