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Squat Jacks are a surefire way to tone your legs and butt ,as well as your inner and outer thighs and provide a serious cardio blast and calorie burn in just 30 seconds. Marks says to do the following: Begin in a squat position, with your feet slightly wider than hip-width and place your hands behind your head, elbows wide. Keeping your core engaged, jump your feet in together, while maintaining a squat position. Quickly jump your feet back wide to the starting position. Be sure to keep your knees behind your toes the entire time.
In total, 1567 participants (790 women) met the inclusion criteria, fulfilled baseline testing and were randomized 1:1 into an exercise training group or to a control group. The exercise training group was further randomized 1:1 to either MCT or HIIT. Participants in the exercise groups were instructed to fill in exercise logs after each exercise session they performed. Data in the present study is based on the exercise logs from the first year of the intervention. Therefore, only participants in the exercise groups were included in the present study (n = 787). Dropouts in the exercise groups during the first year (n = 123) and those with no exercise logs (n = 46) were excluded. A total of 618 participants (291 women) were included in the analyses (Fig. 1). The study was approved by the Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics (REK sør-øst B: 2015/945) and all participants gave their written informed consent before participation.

In parallel, Prussian nationalist and exercise instructor Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778–1852) advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Jahn invented the standard equipment of modern gymnastics; the parallel bars, rings, balance beam, horse, and horizontal bar4 Bakewell S. Illustrations from the Wellcome Institute Library: Medical gymnastics and the Cyriax collection. Med Hist. 1997;41:487–95.10.1017/S0025727300063067[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] and in 1811, founded the Physical Culture Movement in Germany.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Ling and Jahn’s Physical Culture gained following and flourished in gymnasiums throughout Europe and later in the United States of America until the end of the 19th century. However, toward the end of the century, the original concept of harmonious interaction between the competitive and holistic exercise systems eroded and deteriorated. This was due to the late 19th century shift in the gymnasium environment toward harsh paramilitary style training.9–11 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890.
The Alfredson protocol should be continued for 12 weeks to see optimal results.  During that time, you may wish to consult with a physical therapist who can offer advice on when to return to normal activities, such as running.  Your physical therapist can prescribe balance exercises with a BAPS board and plyometric exercises to ensure that you will be able to run and jump without suffering a re-injury to your Achilles' tendon.
The overhead squat requires strength and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: You can take the bar from a squat rack by snatching it overhead or by cleaning and jerking it. The arms should be wider on the bar, very similar to a snatch grip. The feet should be a little outside of shoulder-width. Brace your core, and send your butt back into a squat position while keeping your arms locked overhead. A good cue to think of is “show me your pits” or bending the bar, which automatically externally rotates the shoulders and locks them into a strong position. Once you have reached below parallel, drive your knees out, squeeze your glutes and stand the bar back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders and back.
In line with Martin and colleagues [29] we found that women more often engaged in walking, swimming and dancing compared to men, while men more often performed jogging, cycling and winter sports. Our data also showed that men performed a higher amount of sessions with domestic activities and combined endurance and resistance training compared to women. The sex differences were the same in both training groups, indicating that disparities in type of exercise between older women and men are independent of the exercise intensity they are instructed to perform.

The express route to a two-piece starts here: Bikini Body: Absolution. The pair of 20-minute workouts take the burn-and-firm approach to cinching with a cardio-focused session of jumps, squats, lunges and planks, then a toning series of what a reviewer described as "new-to-me ab exercises that kick the typical crunch's booty." Get ready for the wood-chopping arabesque move, one tester jokingly warned. So sore but so sleek!
Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow technical manual represents the first major advancement in exercise science since Arthur Jones' Nautilus Bulletins were published back in the early 1970's. Unlike most of the books that have been written on the subject over the past few decades, which are based on assumption and faulty reasoning, Mr. Hutchin's SuperSlow manual presents an exercise protocol based on solid reasoning, and principles logically derived from the classical sciences of biology and mechanical physics, and for the first time provides a proper definition of the word: exercise. I very strongly recommend this book to everyone with an interest in exercise, especially physicians, therapists and exercise instructors, who are looking for a safer, a more time-efficient, and a more productive method of exercise for themselves, their patients or clients. SuperSlow is not just better than other exercise protocols, it is so far superior to every other activity ever devised for the purpose of physical conditioning that no meaningful comparison is even possible. This is the future of exercise.
An early detailed documentation of a Western mind–body exercise philosophy was created in the late 18th century by Swedish medical gymnastics teacher Pehr Henrik Ling (1766–1839), who is remembered as the father of Swedish Gymnastics. Ling developed an apparatus-free method to improve functional movement and concurrently address the concept of prevention and healing of human diseases.4 Bakewell S. Illustrations from the Wellcome Institute Library: Medical gymnastics and the Cyriax collection. Med Hist. 1997;41:487–95.10.1017/S0025727300063067[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] His early age rheumatism, experiences as a Fencing Master and his studies of medicine at Uppsala University influenced his ideas on the remedial benefits of physical training.5 Brodin H. Per Henrik Ling and his impact on gymnastics. Sven Med Tidskr. 2008;12(1):61–8.[PubMed] [Google Scholar] His 1853 book ‘Gymnastic Free Exercises’ stated: ‘It cannot be denied that the art of preventing disease is far preferable to that of curing it.’6 Ling PH. The gymnastic free exercises. Boston (MA): Ticknor, Reed and Fields; 1853. [Google Scholar] Ling regarded his ‘gymnastic free exercises’ as one of two separate yet related systems; the other being competitive gymnastics and athletics. Together, these two systems defined what became the Physical Culture or Gymnasium Movement of the 19th century.5,7 Brodin H. Per Henrik Ling and his impact on gymnastics. Sven Med Tidskr. 2008;12(1):61–8.
This online exercise and equipment guide is an interactive reference tool that describes how to perform all pieces of resistance training exercise equipment in the ARC with proper technique and form. It provides descriptions on how to correctly perform other basic resistance exercises which involve dumbbells and free weights. To use this “muscle map” you may search using the name of the exercise, the anatomical muscle group, or the body part. You may also search by location of interest, including the Fitness Lab, Wellness Lab, and the Circuit upstairs.
At the twilight of his career, despite his personal success and loyal group of followers, Pilates was disappointed his philosophy was not adopted by all. However, a group of his followers became recognized mind–body educators in their own right. His dream was realized by them in the 1980s, when Contrology moved into and has since remained within mainstream acceptance and popularity as ‘Pilates.’39,42 Balanced Body, Inc. [Internet]. Origins of Pilates. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/pilates/origins-of-pilates.html.

Our results showed that both the MCT and HIIT group performed an equal amount of exercise sessions alone and together with others, suggesting that both individual and group-related exercise intervention strategies may be attractive to older adults. However, women exercised more frequently together with others than men. This result is in line with previous findings that women aged 60–67 years are less likely than men to prefer physical activity that can be done alone [23], and that more women than men express a need for social support to maintain an exercise program [31].
If you want to form a gym habit, it can be difficult to know what to do or how to workout. Once you become immersed in exercise, it can feel like there’s not enough time to try all the different things! Plain and simple, this is just a knowledge gap. Learning how to workout is like learning anything else, it requires time, research and study. Hiring a personal trainer is the fastest route around this, but it also helps to be a “student of the game” by continuing to educate yourself.
Pilates, yoga and barre all provide an effective workout from which you will see positive physical results. All will help to sculpt and tone your muscles and improve your overall health. Maybe you want to increase your flexibility or cardiovascular endurance, or perhaps you want to tone your muscles without bulking up or you’re favoring a past or present injury. Maybe you want to improve your core strength and posture. An awareness of your present fitness levels and future goals can help you decide which workout method will benefit you the most.
An essential move to any workout. Keep in mind that if doing a push-up on your toes is too tough, you can always start on your knees. It’s still a very effective strengthening move. HOW TO DO IT: Begin the push-up in a plank position with your hands on the ground under your shoulders and with your feet together, toes driving into the ground. Your body should be in one straight line with your core locked. Slowly lower yourself down to the ground so that your chest touches the ground, then push yourself back up to the starting position without collapsing your lower back. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, triceps, biceps and core.
6.  If an exercise can be done for more than 90 seconds, increase the resistance so that momentary muscular failure occurs within 45 - 90 seconds (this is considered "high-intensity" exercise). If you can do sit-ups for ten minutes, the intensity is insufficient to cross that threshold mentioned above, and you're just wasting valuable physiological resources. If you can't do even one rep, reduce the resistance (i.e. if doing a push-up, change from being on your toes to on your knees, or start from the top and slowly lower yourself; if using a machine, choose a lower setting; if using free-weights, pick a lower weight; if doing a chin-up, use a chair to boost yourself up to the top, then take your feet off the chair and slowly lower yourself).
This move works best if you use a low bench. With the low bench at your right side, start with knees slightly bent and hips back. Shift weight to left foot then jump over the bench first with right foot, allowing the left foot to follow. Land lightly on right foot first then left foot. Reverse the move, starting with left foot, to return to starting position.
This move requires a great deal of strength, balance and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: Start by standing on one leg. The opposite leg can be held out in front of your body with your hands on the non-working leg. Think about rooting your foot into the ground while you squat down and back so that the glutes pass below parallel. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves.

When visual inspection gave an indication for group differences, parametric statistical analyses were performed through ANOVA with repeated measures with one withinsubjects factor (post-values for first and second exercise test) and one between-subjects factor (NFO or OTS) or through an independent samples t test. Those analyses were performed in SPSS V.15.0. Sensitivity was also calculated for these variables by dividing the number of correct OTS or NFO diagnoses by hormonal analysis by the total number of OTS or NFO diagnoses according to the consensus statement.1 Sensitivity was presented as a ratio. The denominator varies because of random missing values.

Amazing workout but it takes hard work and serious dedication! THE hardest workout Ive done, hands down. I never thought a dvd workout you see on late night infomercials would be legit, but this is seriously no joke. If you want your body in serious shape fast and youre willing to make the life changes, this will work! Keep going and just dont stop! Life changing product!

Conclusions: Rediscovering the Western mind–body exercise movement is hoped to facilitate official healthcare establishment recognition of this kind of training as an integral entity. This may widen research opportunities and consolidate approaches toward: optimal musculoskeletal rehabilitation and injury prevention, promotion of a healthy active lifestyle environment in the modern world, and enhancement of the natural pain-free human athletic look, feel, and performance.


Both groups exercised most frequently outdoors in nearby area and in nature (Fig. 5). Additional analyses showed that outdoors was the most frequently reported exercise location in both warmer (April–October) and colder (November–March) months. The MCT group had a significantly higher proportion of sessions outdoors than the HIIT group. Contrary, compared to the MCT group, HIIT had a higher proportion of sessions at a gym, sports facility and at home (Fig. 5).
A typical Pilates class usually lasts around 45 minutes to an hour. You need a fitness mat, water bottle and towel and comfortable clothing. Sometimes other gear such as balls, straps and Pilates-specific equipment is used. While available in most studios offering Pilates classes, these items may also be purchased if desired for home use. Like yoga, you will most likely be barefoot during workouts.
Chase Squires is the first to admit that he's no fitness expert. But he is a guy who used to weigh 205 pounds, more than was healthy for his 5'4" frame. "In my vacation pictures in 2002, I looked like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man at the beach," says the 42-year-old Colorado resident. Squires decided enough was enough, cut out fatty food, and started walking on a treadmill. The pounds came off and soon he was running marathons -- not fast, but in the race. He ran his first 50-mile race in October 2003 and completed his first 100-miler a year later. Since then, he's completed several 100-mile, 50-mile, and 50k races.
The participants completed in total 69 492 exercise logs (33 608 HIIT group) during the year, of which 39 075 were received in prepaid envelopes and 30 417 in internet-based forms. Both groups performed 2.2 ± 1.3 exercise sessions per week. Almost 80% of the sessions in the MCT group were actually performed with moderate intensity (11–14 on the Borg scale), while almost 60% of the sessions in the HIIT group were performed with high intensity (≥15 on the Borg scale) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, women had a significantly higher proportion of sessions with moderate intensity compared to men (81.7% vs. 74.9%, p < 0.01). In the HIIT group, men had a higher proportion of sessions with high intensity compared to women (63.7% vs. 52.3%, p < 0.01) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, 9.6, 43 and 47.4% of the sessions had a duration of < 30 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h, respectively. The corresponding percentages in the HIIT group were 10.1, 45 and 44.9%.
Matt Sauerhoff, owner of The LIV Method says one of his favorite, fastest and easiest to do on the go moves is the wall squat. “Start with your back against the wall and your heels about a foot off the wall. Bend your knees and slide down the wall until your legs create a 90-degree angle,” he says. “Make sure your knees are aligned over your toes/laces. Press heels into the floor and focus on contracting your abs, pressing lower back into the wall so it’s flat. Hold for 30 seconds.” Combine it with these 30 Fat-Burning Foods and you’ll be melting the fat in no time!
* If you're looking to control your weight, exercise is the least efficient way to do it. You'd have to run for hours to keep the cookies you ate from adding to your waistline. It's far more effective to not eat the cookies. Making fruits and vegetables a larger part of your diet will help crowd out the foods that don't offer much in the way of nutrition, and which add pounds that shouldn't be there. Also, as you build lean muscle tissue, your body will lessen its fatty tissue, and your shape will change. If you're overweight, you're not trying to lose weight, you're trying to lose fat. If your goal is to look and feel great, strength building exercise will accomplish this while making you fit in the process. Doing only aerobics will not.

Pull-ups have become the quintessential move to any CrossFit workout. HOW TO DO IT: To complete a pull-up, start by hanging from a secured bar with your hands in an overhand grip (palm pointing outward, away from your body) and slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. While squeezing your traps together and engaging your abs, pull yourself up to the bar so that your chin passes over. MUSCLES USED: Back, core, shoulders and chest.

One almost overall finding, at least in endurance and strengthendurance athletes having OTS, is a diminished maximal lactate concentration, whereas submaximal values remain unchanged or slightly reduced.10 12 This is confirmed in the present study where OTS patients did not reach maximal lactate concentrations above 8 mmol l−1. Two out of the four NFO patients did not reach [La]max of 8 mmol l−1 at the first exercise test either (for one patient [La]max was missing). Thus, although low [La]max has frequently been described as a diagnostic marker for OTS, from these results, it does not seem sensitive enough to distinguish OTS from NFO.


The good-morning is a weight training exercise in which a barbell, two dumbbells, or no weight at all is held on the shoulders, behind the head. The person bends forward and bows at the hips and recovers to upright. The good-morning is so called because the movement resembles bowing to greet someone. It involves the hamstrings but is primarily used to strengthen the lower back; the degree of knee bend used will change the focus – nearly straight-legged involving the hamstrings most.

Rep schemes remain in the hypertrophy range this week, but overall volume increases by adding more sets to individual exercises: up to five sets per move for larger bodyparts, and even 10 sets of calf raises on Thursday. This bump in volume will ensure that your muscles are overloaded sufficiently to continue the growth they’ve already begun experiencing in the first three weeks. Completion of this four-week program now entitles you to go to the next stage.

Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.
Pilates is a fitness method that was developed by Joseph Pilates in Germany during World War I. Originally intended to help rehabilitate injured soldiers, Pilates broadened his method to help people of all walks of life, including police officers and dancers, to strengthen their bodies. His method stressed the use of the mind to control the muscles and was often used to help heal and build strength in individuals who were recovering from injuries.
Do you have any health or physical limitations to consider? If you have back problems, knee issues, arthritis, high blood pressure, asthma, or any kind of health or physical limitations, you need to consider these when looking at the array of exercise videos on the market. There are some that will push you to the very edges of your limits and others that can accommodate a necessity for lower impact and a slower pace yet are still effective. Ignoring health problems or physical limitations is very dangerous. Asking your doctor for any restrictions before shopping is a plus as well.
If you haven’t strength trained regularly, muscle loss may now reach critical levels, interfering with balance, gait, and other daily activities. But if you take up strength training, those changes are reversible: A number of studies including adults in their 70s have found that progressive strength training two or three times per week can lead to such improvements as increased muscle mass, more ease with everyday activities like climbing stairs and carrying groceries, and reduced joint pain.
Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
Exercising looks different in every country, as do the motivations behind exercising.[2] In some countries, people exercise primarily indoors, and in others, people primarily exercise outdoors. People may exercise for personal enjoyment, health and well-being, social interactions, competition or training, etc. These differences could potentially be attributed to geographic location, social tendencies, or otherwise.

The first step to any workout routine is to evaluate how fit you are for your chosen physical activity. Whenever you begin an exercise program, it's wise to consult a doctor. Anyone with major health risks, males aged 45 and older, and women aged 55 and older should get medical clearance, says Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief exercise physiologist for the American Council on Exercise.
Physical exercise is important for maintaining physical fitness and can contribute to maintaining a healthy weight, regulating digestive health, building and maintaining healthy bone density, muscle strength, and joint mobility, promoting physiological well-being, reducing surgical risks, and strengthening the immune system. Some studies indicate that exercise may increase life expectancy and the overall quality of life.[10] People who participate in moderate to high levels of physical exercise have a lower mortality rate compared to individuals who by comparison are not physically active.[11] Moderate levels of exercise have been correlated with preventing aging by reducing inflammatory potential.[12] The majority of the benefits from exercise are achieved with around 3500 metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes per week.[13] For example, climbing stairs 10 minutes, vacuuming 15 minutes, gardening 20 minutes, running 20 minutes, and walking or bicycling for transportation 25 minutes on a daily basis would together achieve about 3000 MET minutes a week.[13] A lack of physical activity causes approximately 6% of the burden of disease from coronary heart disease, 7% of type 2 diabetes, 10% of breast cancer and 10% of colon cancer worldwide.[14] Overall, physical inactivity causes 9% of premature mortality worldwide.[14]
Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0.  Morris,33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] and Vaughan,47 Youtube [Internet]. Vaughan, K. Childbirth as an athletic feat (1939). 2009 Feb 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9wRBWDxReY. [Google Scholar] Pilates emphasized breathing techniques, training in sunshine and fresh air. Pilates also advocated the use of minimal and light-fitting clothing, recommended cold exposure and the importance of bathing and treating the skin.45,46 Pilates J. Your health. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1934.
Okay, this one if for the kids, but grown-ups can do it to too. With animated instructions, catchy music, and all the basics of the other full-body workouts, this is another top choice overall. The exercises include some more advanced moves, like tricep dips with a chair and push-ups with rotation, so it’s a great one to do with your kids.                                    

That chronic office slump is a sign that your abs are snoozing; just look at your belly. "Posture is underrated and underutilized when it comes to working our abs," Richey says. His trick: Draw your belly button in as you lift your pelvic floor, as if you were doing a Kegel, to coax your core muscles to start firing together. "Soon, you won't have to consciously think about it," he says. You can do this belly button–pelvic floor "link" several times throughout the day (holding for up to 30 seconds each time) as you're sitting at your desk, in the car, or waiting in line somewhere. (Take the next step in straightening up by tackling this posture workout.)


The snatch is one of the two current olympic weightlifting events (the other being the clean and jerk). The essence of the event is to lift a barbell from the platform to locked arms overhead in a smooth continuous movement. The barbell is pulled as high as the lifter can manage (typically to mid [ chest] height) (the pull) at which point the barbell is flipped overhead. With relatively light weights (as in the "power snatch") locking of the arms may not require rebending the knees. However, as performed in contests, the weight is always heavy enough to demand that the lifter receive the bar in a squatting position, while at the same time flipping the weight so it moves in an arc directly overhead to locked arms. When the lifter is secure in this position, he rises (overhead squat), completing the lift.

That chronic office slump is a sign that your abs are snoozing; just look at your belly. "Posture is underrated and underutilized when it comes to working our abs," Richey says. His trick: Draw your belly button in as you lift your pelvic floor, as if you were doing a Kegel, to coax your core muscles to start firing together. "Soon, you won't have to consciously think about it," he says. You can do this belly button–pelvic floor "link" several times throughout the day (holding for up to 30 seconds each time) as you're sitting at your desk, in the car, or waiting in line somewhere. (Take the next step in straightening up by tackling this posture workout.)

If you’ve ever skipped a workout because you’re just too sore from a previous one (hey, these videos are tough!), you’re definitely not alone. That’s why we love this easy-to-follow routine. It features exercises that stretch and strengthen your muscles simultaneously so you give your body the chance to recover—without skipping a workout altogether. That’s what we consider a win-win.


One hundred and sixty-seven subjects (77 males and 90 females), aged 18–50 years, performed a modified Bruce protocol before (pre) and after (post) a weight loss program of 24 weeks. This program combined physical training (strength, S; endurance, E; combined strength + endurance, SE; or physical activity recommendation, PA) 3 times per week, with a 25%–30% caloric restriction diet.
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