You really listened to us in the prenatal visit and offered lots of useful ideas which helped us prepare fully for the birth. At the time of labor, you were totally perfect, with helpful words, actions, and emotional support. You were strong and soothing. I really got the birth I had hoped for, but couldn’t imagine I would have. Your support postpartum has been awesome with great breastfeeding tips, recovery advice, and more. ~ Kate, Boulder

We not only offer a superior training protocol, SMX also uses state-of-the-art training tools. The majority of our equipment is MEDX Rehabilitative Exercise Equipment, one of the most respected and technologically-advanced fitness, sports, and medical/rehabilitation equipment brands. MedX products are developed through decades of experience and millions of dollars in independent, university-based research. MedX equipment achieves training efficiency through resistance curves matched to tested and proven strength profiles. They operate at a very low level of friction and offer a choice of resistance in 2-pound increments, ensuring a weight that is just right – not too heavy and not too light – for rapid and steady progress. We have also incorporated select Nautilus equipment. Nautilus is considered the gold standard in fitness and a cornerstone of the modern commercial gym.
Are you new to the gym and not sure where to start? Looking to add more variety into your workout? Or are you wanting to master a move to perfection? Then look no further. Learn how to perform exercise moves safely and effectively with our exercise database, which includes top tips from our qualified trainers, video demonstrations, and a step by step guide.

One new exercise is added to each bodypart routine to provide even more angles from which to train your target muscles to promote complete development. You’ll hit each muscle group with two exercises of 3­–4 sets each: four sets for large bodyparts (chest, back, shoulders, quads, hamstrings) and three sets for smaller bodyparts (biceps, triceps, abs, calves). The result is 16 total sets for the week for large bodyparts and 12 sets total for smaller ones—again, working in the 8–15-rep range—which is a substantial increase in volume from Week 1.
It's hard to pinpoint the first time exercise appeared visually on-screen—meaning on film or video, something that you could see, as opposed to hear—but one of the earliest is the 1928 film Exercise: A Film Lesson in Health and Hygiene. It isn't exactly instructional, but features a bunch of boy scouts showing off some rather bizarre group exercise routines. Check out the bit that starts around 1:22, where they ride each other like human chariots. Anyhow, this film is significant in that its primary purpose is to display and broadcast forms of exercise to an audience, and it seems to be the first to have done so.
The overhead squat requires strength and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: You can take the bar from a squat rack by snatching it overhead or by cleaning and jerking it. The arms should be wider on the bar, very similar to a snatch grip. The feet should be a little outside of shoulder-width. Brace your core, and send your butt back into a squat position while keeping your arms locked overhead. A good cue to think of is “show me your pits” or bending the bar, which automatically externally rotates the shoulders and locks them into a strong position. Once you have reached below parallel, drive your knees out, squeeze your glutes and stand the bar back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders and back.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.

Limitation of the Study. One potential limit of the present study undoubtedly regards the limited number of subjects involved in the study and the operating loss of the control group. Unfortunately, too many participants of the latter did not satisfy the requirements during the study, thus impeding a comparative statistical approach. Further studies are therefore needed to confirm our conclusions, in particular with a larger sample and control group.
^ Jump up to: a b c Schuch FB, Vancampfort D, Rosenbaum S, Richards J, Ward PB, Stubbs B (July 2016). "Exercise improves physical and psychological quality of life in people with depression: A meta-analysis including the evaluation of control group response". Psychiatry Res. 241: 47–54. doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2016.04.054. PMID 27155287. Exercise has established efficacy as an antidepressant in people with depression. ... Exercise significantly improved physical and psychological domains and overall QoL. ... The lack of improvement among control groups reinforces the role of exercise as a treatment for depression with benefits to QoL.
I'm a professional weight loss coach and was chosen as "Canada's Top Fitness Professional." Each of my workouts found at makeyourbodywork.com will challenge your entire body and will include elements of cardio, strength, and core conditioning. The uniqueness of these workouts are the "difficulty levels" that provide up to four distinct options for every single move. This makes each workout very accessible for newbies, yet challenging for super-fit users.
“Foam rolling is a form of massage (or trigger point release) that you can do to loosen tight muscles to help improve your mobility,” says Lefkowith. Using a foam roller helps smooth out “knots” in your fascia (the layer of connective tissue surrounding your muscles), which can get in the way of your range of motion. This is crucial for performing exercises with correct form and making sure the right muscle fibers are firing away. While you can stop, drop, and foam roll anytime, it’s often recommended to spend a few minutes with the foam roller before your workout to help get the juices flowing.
Endurance performance (i.e. exercise duration > 1 min) is extensively studied in exercise physiology using cycling and/or running exercise (e.g. [1–4]). Despite being close to real competition events by involving the whole-body, the use of cycling and/or running exercise presents some important limitations to understand the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance. Indeed, as whole-body exercise involves greater systemic responses than isolated exercise [5], it is difficult to interpret some specific experimental manipulations aiming to understand CNS processes regulating muscle fatigue and endurance performance (e.g. manipulation of III-IV muscle afferents [6, 7]). Furthermore, due to the need to transfer the participant from the treadmill/bicycle to the ergometer, the true extent of muscle fatigue at exhaustion is underestimated [8], leading to inconclusive results on how peripheral (i.e. fatigue produced by changes at or distal to the neuromuscular junction [9]) and central (i.e. decrease in maximal voluntary activation level [9]) components of muscle fatigue might interact between each other’s (for review see [2, 9]). Therefore, due to the aforementioned limitations, the development of a new exercise model is required to better investigate the CNS processes regulating endurance performance.
Pilates is a fitness method that was developed by Joseph Pilates in Germany during World War I. Originally intended to help rehabilitate injured soldiers, Pilates broadened his method to help people of all walks of life, including police officers and dancers, to strengthen their bodies. His method stressed the use of the mind to control the muscles and was often used to help heal and build strength in individuals who were recovering from injuries.
(2) Active Phase (between 60% and 84% HRR). Continuous dynamic and interval training mode exercise involving large muscle activities with an increasing level of difficulty and intensity. Subjects began with a short walk, alternated with various step exercises (e.g., both side and forward-backward step up and down on the platform, with alternate footsteps). Then, they went on performing alternate upper-limb lifts (while keeping inferior limbs flexed) and lower limb flexions and extensions (knee lifts, both side and forward-backward leg lifts, and leg curls), as a sort of brief and easy sequence to be repeated for a fixed time. Integrated multiple plane exercises for upper and lower limbs using elastic resistances (Xertube®) completed the last part of the Active Phase. To reach the goal of gradually augmenting the intensity of the program, the coach continuously checked the HRR level of subjects who were progressively increasing the duration and the number of exercises. The resistance of the elastic bands was also increased by one level (from very light to medium) every 4 weeks.
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