Regular aerobic exercise improves symptoms associated with a variety of central nervous system disorders and may be used as an adjunct therapy for these disorders. There is clear evidence of exercise treatment efficacy for major depressive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.[43][48][52][53][54][55] The American Academy of Neurology's clinical practice guideline for mild cognitive impairment indicates that clinicians should recommend regular exercise (two times per week) to individuals who have been diagnosed with this condition.[56] Reviews of clinical evidence also support the use of exercise as an adjunct therapy for certain neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson's disease.[57][58][59][60][61][62] Regular exercise is also associated with a lower risk of developing neurodegenerative disorders.[60][63] A large body of preclinical evidence and emerging clinical evidence supports the use of exercise therapy for treating and preventing the development of drug addictions.[64][65][66][67][68] Regular exercise has also been proposed as an adjunct therapy for brain cancers.[69]
When shopping, take some extra laps around the store. Instead of making your shopping trip efficient, take your time and stroll around the store a couple times. If that feels too aimless, add an objective of memorizing the store's layout. Or, when grocery shopping, don't group items on your list by type. Instead, randomize the order so that you get one thing from the produce section and then get something from a different section before getting your next produce item.
Around thirty years ago, Andersen et al. [10] developed a novel exercise model (i.e. one leg dynamic exercise, OLDE) allowing dynamic isotonic contractions of the knee extensor muscles. This exercise model isolates the knee extensor muscles via an active knee extension and passive knee flexion, and due to the reduced muscle mass involved, this exercise is not limited by cardiorespiratory function [11]. Therefore, this model was extensively used to investigate the effect of OLDE on the cardiorespiratory system (e.g. [12]), skeletal muscle physiology (e.g. [13]) but also with patients suffering from cardiorespiratory limitations [14, 15] or for studying mechanisms regulating circulatory response to rhythmic dynamic exercise [6, 16]. More recently, high intensity OLDE has been used to investigate CNS processes involved in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance [8, 11, 17, 18]. Despite being recently used to investigate muscle endurance, the reliability of high intensity OLDE has not been tested. Reliability can be defined as the consistency of a performance measure, and should be established for any new measurement tool [19, 20]. Furthermore, reliability of a protocol can be used to estimate the sample size required for an appropriate statistical power [20]. The main aim of this study was to establish the reliability of high intensity OLDE as a measure of muscle endurance. Additionally, as the sensitivity of a protocol reflects its ability to detect small changes in performance, we also calculated the smallest worthwhile change as a measure of sensitivity [21].
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.4 article “Mechanisms Associated With Physical ActivityBehavior: Insights From Rodent Experiments” from authors Michael D. Roberts, Gregory N. Ruegsegger, Jacob D. Brown, and Frank W. Booth. Dopaminergic signaling differences in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) seemingly predispose rats to adopt different physical activity behaviors. Physical activity behavior also may be regulated through peripheral mechanisms (i.e., muscle and fat derived as well as hormonal signals). We hypothesize that physical activity behavior is regulated by the convergence of central and peripheral mechanisms onto the NAcc.
Flexibility exercise, or stretching, is a vital component of any exercise regimen. The primary purpose of flexibility training is to increase your range of motion, especially when it comes to muscles and joints. Although flexibility exercise will not improve your endurance or strength as cardio or anaerobic exercise would, flexibility training helps your body maintain its natural alignment. By doing so, flexibility exercise makes your body significantly less prone to injury during cardio or anaerobic exercise. Additionally, practicing flexibility training will increase your freedom of movement in a way that makes everyday activities easier. Tasks such as reaching up for an object on a shelf, getting up from a chair, or even sitting in confined spaces for long periods of time will greatly benefit from flexibility training.
6.  If an exercise can be done for more than 90 seconds, increase the resistance so that momentary muscular failure occurs within 45 - 90 seconds (this is considered "high-intensity" exercise). If you can do sit-ups for ten minutes, the intensity is insufficient to cross that threshold mentioned above, and you're just wasting valuable physiological resources. If you can't do even one rep, reduce the resistance (i.e. if doing a push-up, change from being on your toes to on your knees, or start from the top and slowly lower yourself; if using a machine, choose a lower setting; if using free-weights, pick a lower weight; if doing a chin-up, use a chair to boost yourself up to the top, then take your feet off the chair and slowly lower yourself).
The St Thomas method, however, did not survive World War II, besides the mentioned indications of use in Australia a decade later, and Randell’s work has since been forgotten. Various factors might attribute to this, including the tragic loss in 1940 when two bombs hit St Thomas hospital killing four physiotherapists including Thomas;29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar] and the promotion of rival London obstetric group, led by Grantly Dick-Read and Physiotherapist Helen Heardman, with the concept of natural childbirth. This movement gained favor with the healthcare establishments, chartered physiotherapists and the general public at the ultimate expense of the St Thomas Project.23 Raphael AJ. Natural childbirth in twentieth century England; PhD thesis. London: Queen Mary University of London; 2010. [Google Scholar] Randell left St Thomas physiotherapy school in 1945, just before the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy imposed a new syllabus.37 The National Archives [Internet]. Saint Thomas’ hospital: physiotherapy school. 2009 Aug 12 [cited 2015 Sep 23]. Available from: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/rd/bdb0366b-f3e1-45d3-a685-887f9f9bc8ac. [Google Scholar] She received the royal title of OBE and extended her career interest with a focus on gynecological cases; in 1948, she co-founded the Obstetric Association of Chartered Physiotherapists, was awarded an honorary fellowship of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists and was later remembered as the pioneer of modern women’s health physiotherapy (Figures 1, 5–7).38 Pelvic Obstetric and Gynaecological Physiotherapy [Internet]. A brief history. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pogp.csp.org.uk/brief-history-acpwh. [Google Scholar]

The participants completed in total 69 492 exercise logs (33 608 HIIT group) during the year, of which 39 075 were received in prepaid envelopes and 30 417 in internet-based forms. Both groups performed 2.2 ± 1.3 exercise sessions per week. Almost 80% of the sessions in the MCT group were actually performed with moderate intensity (11–14 on the Borg scale), while almost 60% of the sessions in the HIIT group were performed with high intensity (≥15 on the Borg scale) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, women had a significantly higher proportion of sessions with moderate intensity compared to men (81.7% vs. 74.9%, p < 0.01). In the HIIT group, men had a higher proportion of sessions with high intensity compared to women (63.7% vs. 52.3%, p < 0.01) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, 9.6, 43 and 47.4% of the sessions had a duration of < 30 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h, respectively. The corresponding percentages in the HIIT group were 10.1, 45 and 44.9%.

First, a disclaimer: I have no financial stake in the sale of any of the other books mentioned below in my review of "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol". I'm just interested in promoting safe, logical, scientifically sound methods for people that care about being in good physical condition without any unnecessary risks or wasted time. Any other books or authors mentioned are merely for the purpose of expanding the information available regarding the history (and refinements) of High Intensity Training (HIT) since Arthur Jones first began to popularize the method in the early 1970's.
This is the first review to have focused on exercise as an add-on strategy in the treatment of MDD. Our findings corroborate some previous observations that were based on few studies and which were difficult to generalize.41,51,73,92,93 Given the results of the present article, it seems that exercise might be an effective strategy to enhance the antidepressant effect of medication treatments. Moreover, we hypothesize that the main role of exercise on treatment-resistant depression is in inducing neurogenesis by increasing BDNF expression, as was demonstrated by several recent studies.
A 2015 review of clinical evidence which included a medical guideline for the treatment of depression with exercise noted that the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for depression suffers from some limitations;[53] nonetheless, it stated that there is clear evidence of efficacy for reducing symptoms of depression.[53] The review also noted that patient characteristics, the type of depressive disorder, and the nature of the exercise program all affect the antidepressant properties of exercise therapy.[53] A meta-analysis from July 2016 concluded that physical exercise improves overall quality of life in individuals with depression relative to controls.[43]
Physiological, psychological and EMG responses to the time to exhaustion tests are presented Figs 4 and 5. Leg RPE (Fig 4A), leg muscle pain (Fig 4B) and heart rate (HR, Fig 4C) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Cadence during the time to exhaustion decreased over time (P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for these aforementioned parameters are presented Fig 5. EMG RMS of the VL (Fig 5A), VM (Fig 5B), RF (Fig 5C) and the sum of these muscles (Fig 5D) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for EMG parameters are presented Fig 5. Blood lactate concentration increased (from 1.3 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and blood glucose concentration decreased (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 4.4 ± 0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.001) over time.
Neuromuscular function tests were performed pre and post-exercise to quantify muscle fatigue. As previous studies documented the extent of isometric muscle fatigue induced by OLDE [8, 11, 17, 18], we chose to focus only on isokinetic muscle fatigue. Therefore, knee extensors (KE) MVCs were performed at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s pre (after the warm-up) and post-exercise (13 ± 4s after exhaustion). Subjects were asked to perform two maximal isokinetic knee extensions at each angular velocity (starting position corresponded to knee angle at 90 deg; range of motion was the same as the OLDE). The highest peak torque value of the two trials was considered, and a 20 s recovery was set between each set of KE MVCs. The order of contractions was randomized between sessions as follow (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s) and identical for testing pre and post-exercise of the same session. This randomization allows obtaining a time course of KE MVC torque recovery following the time to exhaustion test at each angular velocity was obtained at a different time point at each session: either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). An overview of timing can be found in Fig 1. Twenty seconds after completion of the last KE MVC, a maximal isometric MVC of the knee flexors was performed (isometric KF MVC). Visual feedback of the torque and strong verbal encouragement were provided for each MVC [please see reference 9 for more details].
Static Hold. Static holds are familiar to some as a great strengthening technique used in yoga. They can be performed with bodyweight movements — get in the top of a plank or a deep squat position and hold — or they can be done by holding weights (in a slightly contracted position or with full lock out). Our tip? Time how long you can hold a plank to see improvement from week to week.
First, a disclaimer: I have no financial stake in the sale of any of the other books mentioned below in my review of "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol". I'm just interested in promoting safe, logical, scientifically sound methods for people that care about being in good physical condition without any unnecessary risks or wasted time. Any other books or authors mentioned are merely for the purpose of expanding the information available regarding the history (and refinements) of High Intensity Training (HIT) since Arthur Jones first began to popularize the method in the early 1970's.

Start in a low lunge position with right foot forward, left foot back, and fingertips touching the ground for balance. In one smooth movement, bring left foot forward and, as you stand on right foot, continue to lift left knee toward chest and hop up on right foot. Land lightly on right foot and immediately slide left foot behind you to return to starting position. Repeat for half the time then switch to the other side.


Description. The patient put one hand over the same shoulder with the palm touching the back and reached down the back. He/she placed the other hand up the back from the waist with the palm facing outwards. Pointing the middle fingers of each hand towards each other, patient tried to touch the fingers of each hand in the middle of the back. The number of inches (centimeters) between the extended middle fingers was measured. The test was always done with the right hand over the shoulder and the left behind the back.
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