Founder Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow has been 'managed' by unscrupulous business partners, into a commercial entity bearing little resemblance to his original intention, (& no involvement with Mr Hutchins himself, nor any of his original associates). The -real- SS was revolutionary for its time, but Hutchins' new textbook, "The Renaissance of Exercise, a Vitruvian Adventure", is the result of his ongoing refinements over the past 18 years. Rather than pay over a $150 for the supposed historic value of a slim, soft-cover, dog-eared $10 book & it's relatively primitive ideas, get the new hard-cover textbook./It seems that one of the main criticisms os The Manual is "too much information". True, for a casual reader.The fact is, ANY exercise protocol is simple enough to write up on one or two pages: How many sets. How many reps. How many exercises. How often. About 10 exercise technique descriptions: Done. It's the precise whys, hows, & special cases that take a book to fulfill.

Also, it stands to reason that if something is done that is very intense, it can't be done for very long, or very often. Therefore, we could walk on a treadmill for an hour, and do that daily, without much problem – or gain. But an activity that is very intense, by necessity, can be done only briefly, and infrequently (to give the body time to recover, and then to compensate, which means growth). The Superslow protocol is only a means to an end; and that end is to provide exercise to the body that is intense enough to stimulate the body to make its own internal improvements.


Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.1 article “Mechanisms and Mediators of the Skeletal Muscle Repeated Bout Effect” from author Rob Hyldahl. Skeletal muscle adapts to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating several but still poorly understood mechanisms that endow protection from subsequent damage. Known widely as the repeated bout effect, we propose that neural adaptations, alterations to muscle mechanical properties, structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and biochemical signaling work in concert to coordinate the protective adaptation.

Two incremental graded exercise tests until exhaustion were performed, with 4 h of rest in between. One hour before each test, the athletes received a standardised meal (2315 kJ, 73% carbohydrate, 19% protein, 8% fat). Athletes arrived in the laboratory at 07:00 after an overnight fast. The first blood sample was collected as they arrived. Immediately after the first exercise test, the second blood sample was drawn. The third and fourth blood samples were drawn before and immediately after the second test. A schematic overview of the protocol can be found in fig 1. Because it is known that venepuncture increases blood prolactin, going back to baseline within 30 min, blood was drawn before and after each test (four punctures) creating the same “stress” in each situation. The study protocol was approved by the university ethical committee.
Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854.  Ling founded the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute in Stockholm in 1822, was an elected member of the Swedish General Medical Association, member of the Swedish Academy, and a Titular Professor. However, Ling remained indifferent to these honors due to the lack of the establishment’s implementation of his methods.7 Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854. [Google Scholar]
The deadlift is one of the foundational strength movements in any exercise program. HOW TO DO IT: The deadlift begins with the bar on the ground. You can perform this with a regular grip or an alternating grip, which means one hand facing towards your body and one hand facing away. With a proud chest and locked core, pull the bar up while keeping it as close to your body as possible. Use your hip hinge and push your knees back to keep your body over the bar. Then extend the hips and squeeze the glutes to complete the move. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, back and core.
The exercises that Kuhn provided can be viewed as a partial list of exercises that might be appropriate for treating an individual with RCIS. We offer modifications to 3 of the proposed exercises and discuss factors used by athletic trainers and physical therapists to establish initial exercise selection, intensity, and periodic modification of an exercise program that were not discussed by Kuhn. Based on current evidence, the anterior shoulder stretch in the proposed protocol might not be the most effective way to stretch the pectoral muscles. When performing the stretch as described in the protocol, the individual is instructed to place his or her hands at shoulder level on either side of a door or corner and to lean forward. This might be a preferred position to initiate pectoral muscle stretch if the individual is unable to perform stretching with the arm elevated as a result of pain; however, evidence3 indicates that changing the position of the upper extremity so that the individual's hand is above the head with the shoulder in 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation likely provides a more effective stretch.

* Strength building is an expensive metabolic process. Although we see it as building muscle, our body is making global metabolic adaptations. It is upgrading its metabolic efficiency by synthesizing more enzymes to make metabolism more capable. This includes aerobic metabolism, anaerobic metabolism, gluconeogenesis, glycogen breakdown and transport, blood buffering agents, and of course new muscle fiber growth. All of this new synthesis is extremely metabolically expensive; that is why your body will not make these changes unless an intense stimulus is applied, and the organism is left undisturbed afterwards to make these changes.
Our system uses specific diaphragmatic breathing exercises along with proper core engagement through isometric holds, co-contractions with bigger muscle groups and muscle control to keep the abdominal muscles strong as the belly grows throughout pregnancy, rehabs post baby and even gains the strength required to prepare the body for pregnancy. All of our breathing and core activation techniques are providing women with a connection to their core that they have never experienced, whether pre-pregnancy, currently pregnancy, or post pregnancy. During the postpartum phase, we continue our focus on the deep core to heal abdominal separation, re-connect the muscles postpartum & help you build a strong foundation in your core for life. Our techniques are paving the way in healing (diastasis recti), incontinence, hernias, etc. while teaching our mamas that pregnancy doesn’t have to leave you feeling broken.
Active recovery is recommended after participating in physical exercise because it removes lactate from the blood more quickly than inactive recovery. Removing lactate from circulation allows for an easy decline in body temperature, which can also benefit the immune system, as an individual may be vulnerable to minor illnesses if the body temperature drops too abruptly after physical exercise.[142]
^ Jump up to: a b c d Ranjbar E, Memari AH, Hafizi S, Shayestehfar M, Mirfazeli FS, Eshghi MA (June 2015). "Depression and Exercise: A Clinical Review and Management Guideline". Asian J. Sports Med. 6 (2): e24055. doi:10.5812/asjsm.6(2)2015.24055. PMC 4592762. PMID 26448838. Keeping in mind that exercise shows no medication side effects such as withdrawal symptoms (20), weight gain, dry mouth or insomnia (21), but shows potential health benefits such as weight reduction, it is highly recommended to use exercise as an adjunctive treatment for depression (22). New findings confirm that exercise can be recommended as a first-line treatment for mild to moderate depression; as an adjunct to medications (23); as an alternative to cognitive behavioral therapy (11); and in preventing depression in clinical as well as healthy populations (24–26). ... Although recent findings have shown that exercise can decrease depressive symptoms, there are still many questions and limitations to wider application of exercise in depression. For instance, there are deficiencies in methodological planning such as uncontrolled nonrandomized trials, small sample sizes, inadequate allocation concealment, lack of intention-to-treat analyses, non-blinded outcome assessments, and inclusion of subjects without clinical diagnosis that limit the interpretability of research outcomes (53).
Sensitivity of ACTH and PRL for the detection of OTS was four out of four and five out of five, respectively (table 2; cutoff, 200% at the second exercise test) and for the detection of NFO was four out of five and three out of three, respectively. Sensitivity of cortisol (cutoff, 200% at the second test) and GH (cutoff, 1000%) for the detection of OTS was four out of five and two out of five, and for the detection of NFO, one out of five and two out of four, respectively (table 2).
How much time are you willing to devote (realistically) to working out? – Another question that being brutally honest with yourself is necessary. Pretending you will devote 2 hours to working out every day isn’t practical unless you do that in some form NOW. Most people can’t keep up a two hour a day workout program unless they are professional fitness trainers or competitors. Exercise videos come in all lengths and intensity levels. Some are very short; others may be 60-90 minutes long. Knowing how much time you have to devote to working out will help you choose an exercise video that provides what you need in the time frame you have available. This will also encourage you to continue using it.
^ Jump up to: a b Szuhany KL, Bugatti M, Otto MW (October 2014). "A meta-analytic review of the effects of exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor". J Psychiatr Res. 60C: 56–64. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.10.003. PMC 4314337. PMID 25455510. Consistent evidence indicates that exercise improves cognition and mood, with preliminary evidence suggesting that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may mediate these effects. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to provide an estimate of the strength of the association between exercise and increased BDNF levels in humans across multiple exercise paradigms. We conducted a meta-analysis of 29 studies (N = 1111 participants) examining the effect of exercise on BDNF levels in three exercise paradigms: (1) a single session of exercise, (2) a session of exercise following a program of regular exercise, and (3) resting BDNF levels following a program of regular exercise. Moderators of this effect were also examined. Results demonstrated a moderate effect size for increases in BDNF following a single session of exercise (Hedges' g = 0.46, p < 0.001). Further, regular exercise intensified the effect of a session of exercise on BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.59, p = 0.02). Finally, results indicated a small effect of regular exercise on resting BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.27, p = 0.005). ... Effect size analysis supports the role of exercise as a strategy for enhancing BDNF activity in humans.
The Instructor – This is one of the most important factors of your exercise video. If you don’t like the instructor, it will eventually irritate you enough to stop using it. Look for instructors that motivate you to work harder and push harder not work to end the video so you don’t have to listen to them anymore. It’s a plus for the instructor to actually have a fitness background of some kind, which is both for your safety and to give you the knowledge that the video has legitimate foundations in real fitness rather than just being something they did on a whim or for celebrity endorsement.

Although there is research concluding the effectiveness of the Alfredson protocol, some individuals find the completion of 180 repetitions of exercise daily to be difficult to achieve.  A study in the February 2014 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy indicated that a modified version of the Alfredson protocol with a "do as much as tolerated" approach achieved similar positive results as the full 180 repetition protocol.
The Push Press is a move that incorporates your entire body. While the strict press focuses only on the upper body, the push press incorporates the lower body to drive the bar up overhead. This synchronic movement is great for building power and pure strength. HOW TO DO IT: Start with the bar across your shoulders. Your hands position on the bar should be just slightly outside of your shoulders, and your feet should be shoulder-width apart. Brace your core, dip slightly into a quarter squat and squeeze your glutes while driving the bar up overhead. Complete the movement with your arms in the lockout position overhead. There is only one dip in the push press, and that is when you push the bar overhead. There should not be a second dip at the top of the bar path or that movement would be called a “jerk.” MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, shoulders and core.
Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet hip-width apart. Place arms at your side and lift up the spine and hips. Only the head, feet, arms, and shoulders should be on the ground. Then lift one leg upwards, keeping the core tight. Slowly bring the leg back down, then lift back up. Try to do 10 reps per leg, then bring the knee in place and spine back on the floor.
Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This protocol was compared with standard protocols in 30 healthy male volunteers, each of whom performed four exercise tests: the STEEP treadmill and bicycle protocols, a modified Bruce treadmill protocol, and a 20 W/min bicycle protocol. During the two STEEP tests the subjects' oxygen consumption rose gradually and exponentially and there was close agreement between the bicycle and the treadmill protocols. A higher proportion of subjects completed the treadmill than the bicycle protocol. Submaximal heart rates were slightly higher during the bicycle test. The STEEP protocol took less time than the modified Bruce treadmill protocol, which tended to produce plateaux in oxygen consumption during the early stages. The 20 W/min bicycle protocol does not take account of subjects' body weight and consequently produced large intersubject variability in oxygen consumption. The STEEP protocol can be used on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer and it should be suitable for a wide range of patients.
There are tons of exercise videos for sale on the market today. That makes finding one that you will enjoy and use both overwhelming but entirely possible since so many are out there. Following the information in these exercise videos buyer’s guide will help you narrow down your choices based on your needs and fitness goals and choose one that you will enjoy and benefit from as well. Knowing what to look for is the most important step in making the right choice for your needs. With so many styles and choices available you can even decide to buy several so you have a good variety to choose from. Boredom is one of the biggest reasons people stop their workouts, so giving yourself choices can alleviate this problem completely.
Eight healthy and moderately active (a minimum of 2 h of aerobic activity per week) adults (mean ± SD; age: 22 ± 2 yrs, height: 171 ± 8 cm, weight: 69 ± 8 kg, 5 males and 3 females) volunteered to participate in this study. None of the subjects had any known mental or somatic disorder. Each subject gave written informed consent prior to the study. Experimental protocol and procedures were approved by the local Ethics Committee of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Kent at Medway (Ethic clearance Prop97_2013_14). The study conformed to the standards set by the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki “Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects” (2008). All subjects were given written instructions describing all procedures related to the study.
Absolute values for KE MVC torques and maximal EMG RMS are presented Table 3. As EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 60 deg/s pre-exercise values significantly differ between sessions, these data were not analyzed. Planned comparisons to explore main effect of time are presented Table 3. Despite a significant main effect of time for the EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 140 deg/s, planned comparison failed to demonstrate a significant difference between times. Changes in KE MVC torque and KE EMG RMS related to baseline are presented Figs 6 and 7. Isometric KF MVC torque did not change over time (75 ± 31 to 73 ± 27 N·m, P = 0.368).
Although there is evidence of Pilates teaching standing exercises at Jacob’s Pillow,48 YouTube [Internet]. Difusión de Pilates. Joseph Pilates holistic video (1932). 2014 Dec 14 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BynuIO3smSI. [Google Scholar] he excluded standing exercises from his 34 exercise Contrology home routine, in contrast to the documented repertoires of Checkley,9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Müller,15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Randell,25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] Vaughan,47 Youtube [Internet]. Vaughan, K. Childbirth as an athletic feat (1939). 2009 Feb 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9wRBWDxReY. [Google Scholar] and Morris33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] that were dominated by standing exercises. He explained: ‘Note that all the exercises are performed while you are in a sitting or reclining position. This is done to relieve your heart from undue strain as well as to take advantage of the more normal (original) visceral organs.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar]
Remember when the only thing your cell phone did was make phone calls? Now, you can waste all kinds of time with smartphone apps that allow you to do everything from playing Scrabble to exercising. Smartphones, iPads and MP3 players are excellent resources for home exercisers, particularly if you find yourself getting bored from doing the same old thing, day after day. With the right apps, you can find guided workouts, paced music, timers and more, all of which can add variety and fun to your home workouts.
Leg muscle pain, defined as “the intensity of hurt that a subject feel in his quadriceps muscles only” [26], was measured during the incremental test (at the end of each minute) and during the time to exhaustion tests (at the end of the warm-up and every 30 s) using the Cook scale [26]. Standardized instructions for the scale were given to each subject before the warm-up. Briefly, subjects were asked to rate the feelings of pain specifically in their quadriceps and not to report other pains they may have experienced (e.g., seat discomfort). Subjects were also asked to not use this rating as an expression of perceived effort [24].
How much time are you willing to devote (realistically) to working out? – Another question that being brutally honest with yourself is necessary. Pretending you will devote 2 hours to working out every day isn’t practical unless you do that in some form NOW. Most people can’t keep up a two hour a day workout program unless they are professional fitness trainers or competitors. Exercise videos come in all lengths and intensity levels. Some are very short; others may be 60-90 minutes long. Knowing how much time you have to devote to working out will help you choose an exercise video that provides what you need in the time frame you have available. This will also encourage you to continue using it.

The split jerk is a very powerful and fast move. HOW TO DO IT: The bar starts in the front rack position with your feet hip-width apart. Take a big breath to tighten your core, then dip straight down just a few inches to get more power. Next, drive the bar up overhead while splitting your legs into a lunge position. The goal is to get under the bar as fast as possible while driving the bar up overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.
It's hard to pinpoint the first time exercise appeared visually on-screen—meaning on film or video, something that you could see, as opposed to hear—but one of the earliest is the 1928 film Exercise: A Film Lesson in Health and Hygiene. It isn't exactly instructional, but features a bunch of boy scouts showing off some rather bizarre group exercise routines. Check out the bit that starts around 1:22, where they ride each other like human chariots. Anyhow, this film is significant in that its primary purpose is to display and broadcast forms of exercise to an audience, and it seems to be the first to have done so.
In the fourth and final week of the program, you’ll train four days in a four-way split that hits each bodypart just once (except for calves and abs, which are each trained twice). Four-day splits are common among experienced lifters because they involve training fewer bodyparts (typically 2–3) per workout, which gives each muscle group ample attention and allows you to train with higher volume. As you’ll see, chest and triceps are paired up, as are back with biceps and quads with hamstrings, each a very common pairing among novice and advanced bodybuilders. Shoulders are trained more or less on their own, and you’ll alternate hitting calves and abs—which respond well to being trained multiple times per week—every other workout. No new exercises are introduced in Week 4 so that you can focus on intensity in your workouts instead of learning new movements.
Jump up ^ Zhou Y, Zhao M, Zhou C, Li R (July 2015). "Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: From human to animal studies". Front. Neuroendocrinol. 40: 24–41. doi:10.1016/j.yfrne.2015.07.001. PMC 4712120. PMID 26182835. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that exercise may serve as a substitute or competition for drug abuse by changing ΔFosB or cFos immunoreactivity in the reward system to protect against later or previous drug use. ... As briefly reviewed above, a large number of human and rodent studies clearly show that there are sex differences in drug addiction and exercise. The sex differences are also found in the effectiveness of exercise on drug addiction prevention and treatment, as well as underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The postulate that exercise serves as an ideal intervention for drug addiction has been widely recognized and used in human and animal rehabilitation. ... In particular, more studies on the neurobiological mechanism of exercise and its roles in preventing and treating drug addiction are needed.

Yoga also offers many mental benefits, such as a reduction in stress level. Greater relaxation and reduced stress leads to a host of other positive body changes including an improvement in circulation, sleep and self-confidence. A positive mental outlook also helps to maintain a healthy immune system, which in turn can ward off other serious ailments such as high cholesterol, heart disease and stroke.


Toning the upper back is the fast track to better posture. This move uses the reformer with an accessory called a long box. Lie on your stomach with your chest just past the edge of the long box. Grab the straps in front of you with straight arms. Lift the head and chest as you pull the straps down toward your hips. The long box will slide forward, with you on top. Release the arms back to the starting position. Do five reps.

Various weighted dumbbells. Some exercises require heavier weights, while others will need lighter weights or none at all. Try to have a range of dumbbells: a light set (3 to 5 pounds for women, 5 to 8 pounds for men), a medium set (5 to 10 pounds for women, 10 to 15 pounds for men), and a heavy set (10 to 20 pounds for women, 15 to 30 pounds for men).
The Stiff-Legged Deadlift is a deadlift variation that specifically targets the posterior chain. Little to no knee movement occurs in this exercise to ensure hamstring, glute, and spinal erector activation. The bar starts on the floor and the individual sets up like a normal deadlift but the knees are at a 160° angle instead on 135° on the conventional deadlift.

Neuromuscular function tests were performed pre and post-exercise to quantify muscle fatigue. As previous studies documented the extent of isometric muscle fatigue induced by OLDE [8, 11, 17, 18], we chose to focus only on isokinetic muscle fatigue. Therefore, knee extensors (KE) MVCs were performed at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s pre (after the warm-up) and post-exercise (13 ± 4s after exhaustion). Subjects were asked to perform two maximal isokinetic knee extensions at each angular velocity (starting position corresponded to knee angle at 90 deg; range of motion was the same as the OLDE). The highest peak torque value of the two trials was considered, and a 20 s recovery was set between each set of KE MVCs. The order of contractions was randomized between sessions as follow (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s) and identical for testing pre and post-exercise of the same session. This randomization allows obtaining a time course of KE MVC torque recovery following the time to exhaustion test at each angular velocity was obtained at a different time point at each session: either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). An overview of timing can be found in Fig 1. Twenty seconds after completion of the last KE MVC, a maximal isometric MVC of the knee flexors was performed (isometric KF MVC). Visual feedback of the torque and strong verbal encouragement were provided for each MVC [please see reference 9 for more details].
Several exercises from Week 1 are carried over to Week 2, but one move is added to each bodypart routine—with the exception of abs—so you can train all muscle groups more completely from multiple angles. Chest, for example, includes two exercises: One is a compound movement (dumbbell bench press) that involves multiple joints (both the shoulder and elbow) to work the largest amount of muscle possible, and the other is an isolation exercise (dumbbell flye) that involves only one joint (shoulder) and targets the pecs to a greater extent. (When doing presses for chest, the deltoids and triceps are involved to a degree, meaning presses don’t isolate the pecs as much as flyes do.)

YouTube [Internet]. Huntly Film Archives. German fitness. (1930's). 2014 Oct 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://youtu.be/KjObalYKTHE.  The fatal blow to traditional Physical Culture in gymnasium clubs occurred at the turn of the 20th century when the new bodybuilding exercise force emerged and dramatically superseded the entire gymnasium floor space.12 Beckwith KA. Building Strength. Alan Calvert, the Milo bar-bell company, and the modernization of American weight training; PhD thesis. Austin: The University of Texas; 2006. [Google Scholar] This forced both traditional Physical Culture systems to require new professional establishments. Competitive athletes and gymnasts started training under ‘The International Gymnastics Federation’ (established in 1881)13 International Gymnastic Federation (FIG) [Internet]. History of gymnastics. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fig-gymnastics.com/site/about/federation/history. [Google Scholar] and within the ‘International Olympic Committee’ (established in 1894).14 The Olympic Museum [Internet]. The modern Olympic games. 2014 Dec 16 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.olympic.org/Assets/TOM_2013/Visit/Schools/TOM_teaching_list/ENG_The_Modern_Olympic.pdf. [Google Scholar] Concurrently, mind–body enthusiasts migrated to new independent schools, in which pioneers could express their opinions freely and gain popular following. Between 1890 and 1925, at least six new MMB schools emerged, sharing a similar exercise philosophy and practicing similar exercises. These methods, which are the focus of this paper, were led by six charismatic pioneers: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris.
Aerobic exercise induces short- and long-term effects on mood and emotional states by promoting positive affect, inhibiting negative affect, and decreasing the biological response to acute psychological stress.[45] Over the short-term, aerobic exercise functions as both an antidepressant and euphoriant,[46][47][48][49] whereas consistent exercise produces general improvements in mood and self-esteem.[50][51]

The Bloom Method is for every woman preparing for pregnancy, currently expecting, or even years postnatal. A variation of our techniques can be beneficial to everyone regardless of your fitness level or the vision you have for your birth. The Bloom Method is here to support each of you during your life-altering experience while providing you with simple and effective techniques that you can apply to your life no matter what your day to day looks like. We make it easy and doable for you, so that you can focus on being a mother, a friend, a partner and anything else life demands of you. We’ve got you’re back and your core for that matter, trust us, after all, this entire mehthod was created with you in mind.
The bent-over row is performed while leaning over, holding a weight hanging down in one hand or both hands, by pulling it up towards the abdomen. This is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. The torso is unsupported in some variants of this exercise, in which case lifting belts are often used to help support the lower back.
The thruster is a compound movement, meaning that it is a multi-joint movement that works several muscle groups. HOW TO DO IT: The thruster begins in the front rack position across your chest. Squat down, keeping your chest big and knees out. Drive out of the bottom of the hole, similar to a front squat, while driving your knees out. Then use the force you are creating in the squat to drive the bar overhead. Then lock out your arms overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.
Jump up ^ Zhou Y, Zhao M, Zhou C, Li R (July 2015). "Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: From human to animal studies". Front. Neuroendocrinol. 40: 24–41. doi:10.1016/j.yfrne.2015.07.001. PMC 4712120. PMID 26182835. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that exercise may serve as a substitute or competition for drug abuse by changing ΔFosB or cFos immunoreactivity in the reward system to protect against later or previous drug use. ... As briefly reviewed above, a large number of human and rodent studies clearly show that there are sex differences in drug addiction and exercise. The sex differences are also found in the effectiveness of exercise on drug addiction prevention and treatment, as well as underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The postulate that exercise serves as an ideal intervention for drug addiction has been widely recognized and used in human and animal rehabilitation. ... In particular, more studies on the neurobiological mechanism of exercise and its roles in preventing and treating drug addiction are needed.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
* If you're looking to control your weight, exercise is the least efficient way to do it. You'd have to run for hours to keep the cookies you ate from adding to your waistline. It's far more effective to not eat the cookies. Making fruits and vegetables a larger part of your diet will help crowd out the foods that don't offer much in the way of nutrition, and which add pounds that shouldn't be there. Also, as you build lean muscle tissue, your body will lessen its fatty tissue, and your shape will change. If you're overweight, you're not trying to lose weight, you're trying to lose fat. If your goal is to look and feel great, strength building exercise will accomplish this while making you fit in the process. Doing only aerobics will not.
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