Both groups performed an equal proportion of exercise sessions alone (MCT: 50%, HIIT: 49.6%) and together with others (MCT: 50%, HIIT: 50.4%). In both groups, women had a significantly higher proportion of sessions together with others compared to men (56% vs. 44%, p < 0.01). The HIIT group had a significantly higher proportion of sessions organized by Generation 100 compared to the MCT group (8.1% vs. 5.9%, p < 0.01).
The main aim of this study was to test the reliability of a novel OLDE protocol performed at high intensity (workload fixed at 85% peak power output [22]). Isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery up to 40 s post exercise were also measured. Subjects visited the laboratory on four different days. During the first visit, subjects were familiarized with the OLDE protocol (see One Leg Dynamic Exercise for more details), and performed after 30 min recovery an incremental test to measure peak power output. After 30 min recovery following the incremental test, subjects were familiarized with neuromuscular testing (see Neuromuscular Function Tests for more details) and the time to exhaustion test. As suggested by Andersen et al. [10], torque and electromyographic (EMG) feedback were used to ensure a quick and reliable familiarization to the novel OLDE protocol. Each of the following three visits (reliability sessions) consisted of completion of the time to exhaustion test with neuromuscular testing pre and post-exercise. An overview of these three sessions can be seen in Fig 1.
The popular belief is that two training methods are needed to be physically fit: working with weight for muscle strength, and aerobics for cardiovascular fitness. This is untrue. One of the biggest jobs of the cardiopulmonary system (heart and lungs) is to service the muscles. If the cardiopulmonary system were a retail store, the muscular system would be its biggest customer. When your muscular system works harder, the cardiopulmonary system works harder; it's not the other way around. So, working your muscles hard will force the cardiopulmonary system to work hard. Muscular work of sufficient intensity requires the cardiopulmonary system to work hard to meet muscular demands, so one activity takes care of both muscular and cardiopulmonary fitness. And that activity is strength training. Think about it, you can't exercise the cardiopulmonary system without exercising the muscular system! So, although the fitness industry remains blind to the above facts, strength training will provide you with every exercise-related health benefit you could possibly want. Doing "cardio work" is a waste of time and physiological resources, and can actually be counterproductive.
The symptoms associated with OTS, such as changes in emotional behaviour, prolonged feelings of fatigue, sleep disturbances and hormonal dysfunctions are indicative of changes in the regulation and coordinative function of the hypothalamus.8 19 Previous studies have shown different results for stress-induced hormonal responses.6 20 21 Results from a previous study10 and the present study show that contradictory findings cannot solely be explained by different measurement methods and/or definitions used. From figs 3 and 4, it is clear that hormonal responses to one single exercise bout are not sensitive enough to distinguish NFO from OTS.
I've been climbing for about a year. This book provides a lot of fundamental techniques for things such as warmup and antagonist training. It's easy to get overzealous when it comes to training but the book gives you keys to build a strong foundation and helps you identify what your already doing right. I will be applying the information to my training.

In Week 1 you’ll perform three sets of every exercise per workout, which over the course of the week adds up to nine sets total for each bodypart, a good starting volume for your purposes. With the exception of crunches for abs, you’ll do 8–12 reps per set. This rep scheme is widely considered ideal for achieving gains in muscle size (the scientific term is hypertrophy) and is commonly employed by amateur and pro bodybuilders alike.


“Foam rolling is a form of massage (or trigger point release) that you can do to loosen tight muscles to help improve your mobility,” says Lefkowith. Using a foam roller helps smooth out “knots” in your fascia (the layer of connective tissue surrounding your muscles), which can get in the way of your range of motion. This is crucial for performing exercises with correct form and making sure the right muscle fibers are firing away. While you can stop, drop, and foam roll anytime, it’s often recommended to spend a few minutes with the foam roller before your workout to help get the juices flowing.


Mice having access to activity wheels engaged in voluntary exercise and increased their propensity to run as adults.[150] Artificial selection of mice exhibited significant heritability in voluntary exercise levels,[151] with "high-runner" breeds having enhanced aerobic capacity,[152] hippocampal neurogenesis,[153] and skeletal muscle morphology.[154]

Stand on right foot with left foot elevated and core tight. Hop 3 times then bend down and quickly walk hands out so you are in a high plank position with left foot still off ground. Do 3 push-ups, never putting left foot down. Walk hands back and stand up to return to starting position. Repeat for half the time on one side only, then switch sides.


The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.

×