Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.

These may be your go-to lower-body moves, but if you do them mindfully—and with dumbbells—squats can double as an ab-firming opportunity. "When you lower into a squat, you have to draw the navel in and activate your pelvic floor to protect the lower back, and then you squeeze the glutes to rise, which are part of your core as well," says celebrity trainer Kira Stokes, creator of the Stoked Method workouts. Up the ante by holding weights or a bar overhead or across your shoulders in front of your body. (Kick your squats into high gear with these 16 booty-boosting squats.)

16.  Make sure you stay hydrated! Even mild dehydration hampers recovery. The drink of choice? Water! And for mineral replacement, especially sodium, I make sure my diet includes various amounts of celery, romaine lettuce, and a nutritional adjunct to the diet, a powdered barley grass juice called Daily Green Boost (if the foods I eat are grown in soils that are sodium insufficient, I won't get enough sodium, and if those foods that are supposed to be good sources of sodium don't taste savory, they are grown in sub-par soils).
Lose yourself in the high-energy rhythm of the Pound Rockout Results System, a five-disc sweatfest in which you wield drumsticks (aka Ripstix) instead of weights. "The drumming takes your mind off your muscles hurting!" one tester marveled. You'll "constantly tap the sticks" in each routine—core, upper body, lower body, intervals, tune-up and jam session—for a "totally unique" cardio blast.
Multiple new, yet generally typical MMB methods originated after 1950, including the Feldenkrais Method;51 Reese M [Internet]. A biography of Moshe Feldenkrais. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.feldenkrais.com/moshe-feldenkrais. [Google Scholar] the modern form of Calisthenics;52 Ozer Kaya D, Duzgun I, Baltaci G, Karacan S, Colakoglu F. Effects of calisthenics and Pilates exercises on coordination and proprioception in adult women: a randomized controlled trial. J Sport Rehabil. 2012;21(3):235–43. [Google Scholar] Gyrokinesis and Gyrotonic by Horvath;53 Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.gyrotonic.com. [Google Scholar] Gaga by Naharin54 Gaga [Internet]. 2015 Aug 28 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://gagapeople.com/english/about-gaga/. [Google Scholar] and CoreAlign55 The CoreAlign [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/education/corealign/index.html. [Google Scholar] and Human Harmony by Hoffman.56 Human Harmony Training [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fffforlife.com/#!human-harmony-training/c66t. [Google Scholar] In recent decades, many allied health professionals and therapists have embraced the MMB concepts as an integral part of their practice and detailed in mainstream scientific literature their research findings on its effectiveness.57–59 Wells C, Kolt GS, Marshall P, Hill B, Bialocerkowski A. Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:7. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563510/10.1186/1471-2288-13-7
Cardio-wise, there's no need to completely abandon what you love. Just tweak it. "At least one day a week, do a different activity than usual," Dixon advises. "If you're a walker, hit the pool. If you're a cyclist, get to know the rowing machine." Increase intensity during your second cardio workout of the week, and up your workout time during the third session. "Those three changes will keep your body guessing," she says.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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