Element 5 Day Yoga offers five 15-minute sequences to pick and choose from based on your mood and motivation. "It's an easy way to get to the mat every day," one tester said, whether your body needs a Stretch & Restore session or more of an invigorating Energy & Flexibility set. Plus "the instructor provided just enough guidance, no unnecessary chatter." Namaste to that.
I enjoyed your functional training exercises, but I’m not sure about some of them as I was recently diagnosed with a small tear in my rotator cuff. I’m not planning on having surgery. My doctor said that I could work out, but other than saying not to do straight bar bench presses, he said if it hurts, don’t do it. I would love a little more direction than that. Do you have anything more to offer? Thank you.
Jump up ^ Gomez-Pinilla F, Hillman C (January 2013). "The influence of exercise on cognitive abilities". Compr. Physiol. 3 (1): 403–428. doi:10.1002/cphy.c110063. ISBN 9780470650714. PMC 3951958. PMID 23720292. Abundant research in the last decade has shown that exercise is one of the strongest promoters of neurogenesis in the brain of adult rodents (97, 102) and humans (1,61), and this has introduced the possibility that proliferating neurons could contribute to the cognitive enhancement observed with exercise. In addition to BDNF, the actions of IGF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (54) are considered essential for the angiogenic and neurogenic effects of exercise in the brain. Although the action of exercise on brain angiogenesis has been known for many years (10), it is not until recently that neurovascular adaptations in the hippocampus have been associated with cognitive function (29). Exercise enhances the proliferation of brain endothelial cells throughout the brain (113), hippocampal IGF gene expression (47), and serum levels of both IGF (178) and VEGF (63). IGF-1 and VEGF, apparently produced in the periphery, support exercise induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as corroborated by blocking the effects of exercise using antibodies against IGF-1 (47) or VEGF (63).

Stand on right foot with left foot elevated and core tight. Hop 3 times then bend down and quickly walk hands out so you are in a high plank position with left foot still off ground. Do 3 push-ups, never putting left foot down. Walk hands back and stand up to return to starting position. Repeat for half the time on one side only, then switch sides.
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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