Alternatively, anaerobic means an “absence of free oxygen.” It’s any form of high-intensity exercise that leaves you winded relatively quickly. A well developed aerobic system can produce energy for a long time, while your anaerobic capabilities cease anywhere from 10–120 seconds. Weightlifting, sprinting, plyometrics and HIIT are examples of anaerobic exercise. Explosiveness and an ability to generate power and or speed in small bursts is a trait of athletes that require anaerobic capabilities. Interestingly, the more developed your aerobic system, the longer it takes to burn through your anaerobic system. In this respect, you can think of aerobic exercise as a building block for anaerobic capacity.
“Everyone can dance! Just embrace your style! And, if it’s for fitness, well, the point is to get you moving, not to be a professional! So, if you’re sweating and having a good time, you’re doing it right!” says Blogilates creator Cassey Ho. In this video, she takes you through a step-by-step, 14-minute dance cardio workout, complete with instructions. This video is great for those who need a bit of extra guidance. After you’ve learned the exercises, you may even be able to take a few of these moves to the floor.
In the third week of the program we step it up to a three-day training split: Train all “pushing” bodyparts (chest, shoulders, triceps) on Day 1; hit the “pulling” bodyparts (back, biceps) and abs on Day 2; and work your lower body (quads, glutes, hamstrings, calves) on Day 3. As in Week 2, you train each bodypart twice a week, so you’ll hit the gym six days this week.
Clean & Jerk: The other Olympic lift, the clean & jerk actually encompasses two separate movements. Athletes start by explosively lifting a weighted barbell from the ground to the shoulders, often squatting under and then standing to recover. After a brief pause, athletes take a shallow dip and then drive upward to propel the bar overhead, often landing in a split position and then bringing their feet back in line.

Matt Sauerhoff, owner of The LIV Method says one of his favorite, fastest and easiest to do on the go moves is the wall squat. “Start with your back against the wall and your heels about a foot off the wall. Bend your knees and slide down the wall until your legs create a 90-degree angle,” he says. “Make sure your knees are aligned over your toes/laces. Press heels into the floor and focus on contracting your abs, pressing lower back into the wall so it’s flat. Hold for 30 seconds.” Combine it with these 30 Fat-Burning Foods and you’ll be melting the fat in no time!
If there’s one travel-friendly workout tool, it’s the resistance band. Not only does it weigh next to nothing and take up little room in your bag, it’s also super versatile. And if you’re a fan of our full-body resistance band workout, you’ll definitely dig this free workout video. It combines strength movements, like rear lunges with a rotation, with heart rate-boosting exercises for a routine that’ll challenge your entire body.
Multiple new, yet generally typical MMB methods originated after 1950, including the Feldenkrais Method;51 Reese M [Internet]. A biography of Moshe Feldenkrais. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.feldenkrais.com/moshe-feldenkrais. [Google Scholar] the modern form of Calisthenics;52 Ozer Kaya D, Duzgun I, Baltaci G, Karacan S, Colakoglu F. Effects of calisthenics and Pilates exercises on coordination and proprioception in adult women: a randomized controlled trial. J Sport Rehabil. 2012;21(3):235–43. [Google Scholar] Gyrokinesis and Gyrotonic by Horvath;53 Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.gyrotonic.com. [Google Scholar] Gaga by Naharin54 Gaga [Internet]. 2015 Aug 28 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://gagapeople.com/english/about-gaga/. [Google Scholar] and CoreAlign55 The CoreAlign [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/education/corealign/index.html. [Google Scholar] and Human Harmony by Hoffman.56 Human Harmony Training [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fffforlife.com/#!human-harmony-training/c66t. [Google Scholar] In recent decades, many allied health professionals and therapists have embraced the MMB concepts as an integral part of their practice and detailed in mainstream scientific literature their research findings on its effectiveness.57–59 Wells C, Kolt GS, Marshall P, Hill B, Bialocerkowski A. Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:7. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563510/10.1186/1471-2288-13-7
The purpose of this paper is to investigate the history, origins, and influences of Western MMB training, to raise healthcare stakeholders’ awareness of this type of training and to initiate the consideration of official acceptance of MMB methods as an independent exercise category alongside aerobic training and weightlifting. This would provide decision-makers and individuals with new tools to prescribe optimal exercise combinations for remedial purposes, prevention of pathologies, and obesity as well as general health and performance enhancement. Significantly, these are the major factors that facilitate a regular active lifestyle.
Although there have been hundreds of studies on physical exercise and the immune system, there is little direct evidence on its connection to illness. Epidemiological evidence suggests that moderate exercise has a beneficial effect on the human immune system; an effect which is modeled in a J curve. Moderate exercise has been associated with a 29% decreased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), but studies of marathon runners found that their prolonged high-intensity exercise was associated with an increased risk of infection occurrence. However, another study did not find the effect. Immune cell functions are impaired following acute sessions of prolonged, high-intensity exercise, and some studies have found that athletes are at a higher risk for infections. Studies have shown that strenuous stress for long durations, such as training for a marathon, can suppress the immune system by decreasing the concentration of lymphocytes.[26] The immune systems of athletes and nonathletes are generally similar. Athletes may have slightly elevated natural killer cell count and cytolytic action, but these are unlikely to be clinically significant.[27]
If you’ve ever skipped a workout because you’re just too sore from a previous one (hey, these videos are tough!), you’re definitely not alone. That’s why we love this easy-to-follow routine. It features exercises that stretch and strengthen your muscles simultaneously so you give your body the chance to recover—without skipping a workout altogether. That’s what we consider a win-win.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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