We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.
When stress is chronically induced, as in NFO and OTS, two specific mechanisms could occur: first, when corticosteroid levels are chronically too high, a hypersensitivity of the receptors will occur, this can lead to a disinhibition of CRHproducing neurons, which in turn will lead to an intensified release of ACTH (as seen in the second exercise bout in the NFO athletes). When the chronic stress situation continues and glucocorticoid receptors are chronically activated (which occurs in post-traumatic stress disorder17 and depression),25 a blunted ACTH response to CRH will occur.28

Torque signal and knee angle signal were recorded using the same dynamometer as for the OLDE (Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer, CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). During the tests a two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Torque signal and knee angle signal were digitized on-line at a sampling frequency of 1 kHz using a computer, and stored for analysis with commercially available software. Torque signal was filtered prior to data analysis (Butterworth low-pass filter at 100 Hz). Torque signal, knee angle signal and EMG signal were recorded with the same device (MP150, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA) and analyzed with the same commercially available software (Acqknowledge 4.2 for MP Systems, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA).
Jump up ^ Olsen CM (December 2011). "Natural rewards, neuroplasticity, and non-drug addictions". Neuropharmacology. 61 (7): 1109–1122. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2011.03.010. PMC 3139704. PMID 21459101. Similar to environmental enrichment, studies have found that exercise reduces self-administration and relapse to drugs of abuse (Cosgrove et al., 2002; Zlebnik et al., 2010). There is also some evidence that these preclinical findings translate to human populations, as exercise reduces withdrawal symptoms and relapse in abstinent smokers (Daniel et al., 2006; Prochaska et al., 2008), and one drug recovery program has seen success in participants that train for and compete in a marathon as part of the program (Butler, 2005). ... In humans, the role of dopamine signaling in incentive-sensitization processes has recently been highlighted by the observation of a dopamine dysregulation syndrome in some patients taking dopaminergic drugs. This syndrome is characterized by a medication-induced increase in (or compulsive) engagement in non-drug rewards such as gambling, shopping, or sex (Evans et al., 2006; Aiken, 2007; Lader, 2008).
The Pull-up is performed by hanging from a chin-up bar above head height with the palms facing forward (supinated) and pulling the body up so the chin reaches or passes the bar. The pull-up is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. A chin-up (palms facing backwards) places more emphasis on the biceps and a wide grip pullup places more emphasis on the lats. As beginners of this exercise are often unable to lift their own bodyweight, a chin-up machine can be used with counterweights to assist them in the lift.
This is what you should be doing before exercise to raise your heart rate and body temperature in preparation for the workout. During this type of warm-up, you moving through stretches and light exercises without stopping (as opposed to a passive stretches, which are held in place, like you do in a cool-down). This helps increase mobility and range of motion so you can get deeper into exercises. Here are five great dynamic warm-up stretches to try.
The main aim of this study was to test the reliability of a novel OLDE protocol performed at high intensity (workload fixed at 85% peak power output [22]). Isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery up to 40 s post exercise were also measured. Subjects visited the laboratory on four different days. During the first visit, subjects were familiarized with the OLDE protocol (see One Leg Dynamic Exercise for more details), and performed after 30 min recovery an incremental test to measure peak power output. After 30 min recovery following the incremental test, subjects were familiarized with neuromuscular testing (see Neuromuscular Function Tests for more details) and the time to exhaustion test. As suggested by Andersen et al. [10], torque and electromyographic (EMG) feedback were used to ensure a quick and reliable familiarization to the novel OLDE protocol. Each of the following three visits (reliability sessions) consisted of completion of the time to exhaustion test with neuromuscular testing pre and post-exercise. An overview of these three sessions can be seen in Fig 1.
An opposite arm to leg crunch will tone the abs and improves posture by strengthening the back. Duhamel says to “lay down flat on your back raise your right arm above your head and then lift the left leg up. While the leg is lifting, you lift the right arm and reach the hand to meet the outer corner of the left foot.” Be sure to focus on finding that rotation and do not let the foot or hand touch the ground. Do this move on each side for 30 seconds per side.
The VE group consisted of 8 women and 12 men (age 69.6 ± 3.9 years; weight 70.7 ± 12.1 kg; height 161.3 ± 6.9 cm). The control group consisted of 6 women and 14 men (age 71.2 ± 3.7 years; weight 76.1 ± 12.3 kg; height 167.5 ± 9.8 cm). Only 20 subjects of the VE group and 8 of the control group correctly completed the trials (see Figure 1 and Limitation of the Study paragraph). Adherence to protocol of the VE group was checked daily by our motor scientist by means of a daily record where he noted the week and participation number, the mean HR of the sessions, the type of exercises, and the number of repetitions per set carried out. During the training period, no adverse events such as dizziness, musculoskeletal pain, or cardiovascular issues were recorded. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in strength, flexibility, balance, and agility tested by SFT. T0-T1 differences are shown in Figures ​Figures22 and ​and3.3. Namely, 5 tests out of 6 showed significant improvement: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4; T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6; T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7; T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm; T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm; T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Conversely, the 8-foot up and go test (T0 6.5 ± 7.6 sec; T1 4.5 ± 0.6 sec, p > 0.05) showed no significant statistical difference due to a high SD in T0 assessment.
×