How much time are you willing to devote (realistically) to working out? – Another question that being brutally honest with yourself is necessary. Pretending you will devote 2 hours to working out every day isn’t practical unless you do that in some form NOW. Most people can’t keep up a two hour a day workout program unless they are professional fitness trainers or competitors. Exercise videos come in all lengths and intensity levels. Some are very short; others may be 60-90 minutes long. Knowing how much time you have to devote to working out will help you choose an exercise video that provides what you need in the time frame you have available. This will also encourage you to continue using it.

Pilates and his followers stood apart from the other MMB schools for surviving a turbulent century, for making multiple millions of people healthier in mind and body and for being a major force in reintroducing mind–body methods to healthcare establishments today. Furthermore, Pilates deserves credit for inventing his ingenious exercise equipment, which uniquely blends in harmoniously with the universal mind–body philosophy.
How was it discovered that there is no such thing as an overall, general, cardiopulmonary fitness? Out of shape college kids were recruited for a study where they trained on a stationary bike for 90 days, but only one leg did the pedaling. Before they started training, their VO2max was tested, first using both legs, then only the left leg, and then just the right leg. (VO2max is a measurement of cardiopulmonary efficiency.) As you might imagine, all three results were the same. Then one leg was worked out for 90 days on the bicycle; the other leg got to continue to be a couch potato. At the end of the 90 days, you could tell by looking which leg had been exercised. Now for the revealing part. When VO2max was tested for the leg that had been trained, its VO2max improved as expected. But what do you think happened when the unexercised leg was tested? Do you think its VO2max also improved along with the other leg, or do your think there was no improvement. It's shocking how many personal trainers and exercise physiologists that I put this question to got it wrong. There was no improvement. Proving that cardiopulmonary efficiency is muscle specific. This means that when you get less winded, and your heart rate no longer rises as much after you've trained to do something, it's not your heart or lungs that accounted for the improvement, it's the muscles involved.
Starting on the hands and knees, keep a flat back and engage the core. Raise the left leg straight back, stopping when the foot is hip-level and the thigh parallel to the floor. Balance for as long as possible, then raise the bottom right toe off the floor, tightening the butt, back, and abs (try to be graceful here!). Hold for up to 10 seconds, then switch legs.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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