The Russian twist is a type of exercise that is used to work the abdomen muscles by performing a twisting motion on the abdomen. This exercise is performed sitting on the floor with knees bent like in a "sit-up" position with the back typically kept off the floor at an angle of 45°. In this position, the extended arms are swung from one side to another in a twisting motion with or without weight.
After 5 min warm up at 20% of peak power output, subjects performed a time to exhaustion at 85% of peak power output. Exhaustion was defined as a decrease in cadence below 40 cpm for a duration ≥ 10 s or when the subject voluntarily stopped. Subjects were not aware of the time elapsed during the time to exhaustion test. Verbal encouragements were provided by an experimenter naïve of time to exhaustion during the previous sessions.
They’re fun and easy to do: Keep your upper body facing forward while your lower body moves; start with 10 swivels to the right, then 10 to the left. Then do 9 swivels to the right, 9 to the left, then 8 right 8 left, and so on down to one. As each set has your upper body twisting faster and faster, you should feel your abdominal muscles burning and your hips getting loose.
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YouTube [Internet]. Huntly Film Archives. German fitness. (1930's). 2014 Oct 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://youtu.be/KjObalYKTHE.  The fatal blow to traditional Physical Culture in gymnasium clubs occurred at the turn of the 20th century when the new bodybuilding exercise force emerged and dramatically superseded the entire gymnasium floor space.12 Beckwith KA. Building Strength. Alan Calvert, the Milo bar-bell company, and the modernization of American weight training; PhD thesis. Austin: The University of Texas; 2006. [Google Scholar] This forced both traditional Physical Culture systems to require new professional establishments. Competitive athletes and gymnasts started training under ‘The International Gymnastics Federation’ (established in 1881)13 International Gymnastic Federation (FIG) [Internet]. History of gymnastics. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fig-gymnastics.com/site/about/federation/history. [Google Scholar] and within the ‘International Olympic Committee’ (established in 1894).14 The Olympic Museum [Internet]. The modern Olympic games. 2014 Dec 16 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.olympic.org/Assets/TOM_2013/Visit/Schools/TOM_teaching_list/ENG_The_Modern_Olympic.pdf. [Google Scholar] Concurrently, mind–body enthusiasts migrated to new independent schools, in which pioneers could express their opinions freely and gain popular following. Between 1890 and 1925, at least six new MMB schools emerged, sharing a similar exercise philosophy and practicing similar exercises. These methods, which are the focus of this paper, were led by six charismatic pioneers: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris.
Calling all new moms! Whether you're looking to stay in shape during pregnancy, or get back into shape afterward, this workout is designed to give you a long, lean body. A blend of Pilates and barre moves, it follows the guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists so that you can rest assured that you're exercising safely.
Jump up ^ Olsen CM (December 2011). "Natural rewards, neuroplasticity, and non-drug addictions". Neuropharmacology. 61 (7): 1109–1122. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2011.03.010. PMC 3139704. PMID 21459101. Similar to environmental enrichment, studies have found that exercise reduces self-administration and relapse to drugs of abuse (Cosgrove et al., 2002; Zlebnik et al., 2010). There is also some evidence that these preclinical findings translate to human populations, as exercise reduces withdrawal symptoms and relapse in abstinent smokers (Daniel et al., 2006; Prochaska et al., 2008), and one drug recovery program has seen success in participants that train for and compete in a marathon as part of the program (Butler, 2005). ... In humans, the role of dopamine signaling in incentive-sensitization processes has recently been highlighted by the observation of a dopamine dysregulation syndrome in some patients taking dopaminergic drugs. This syndrome is characterized by a medication-induced increase in (or compulsive) engagement in non-drug rewards such as gambling, shopping, or sex (Evans et al., 2006; Aiken, 2007; Lader, 2008).
Two moves is better than one, right? You may want to do this move on a mat or a towel for padding. Start in a high plank position with core tight. Lower onto both forearms at the same time, maintaining a tight core and level hips. Now push back up onto hands at the same time to return to starting position. Finish by drawing right knee into chest, then left knee into chest, doing a mountain climber.

Perhaps one of the best benefits of barre is that it’s fun! It incorporates the use of upbeat music and engaging choreography. When working out is fun and enjoyable, your chances of staying with the program greatly increase. The barre method also offers quick results. Barre helps strengthen and tone your muscles without increasing bulk, and it improves your posture. It also increases cardiovascular endurance and metabolism, which helps to quickly burn calories.

Fit septuagenarians may even need to be held back: “Strength training is super empowering,” she says. “And people get excited when they see and feel the results. I have older clients doing multiple timed sets of kettlebell swings. One older client biked 2,700 miles in 50 days. It takes a little longer, but they can reach really impressive levels of fitness.”
Before beginning any workout program, it’s always a good idea to consult your physician. Individuals with pre-existing injuries or medical conditions or those who don’t have an accurate knowledge of their current physical fitness level should always begin cautiously. It’s also extremely important to perform all workouts, no matter what fitness method you’re doing, under the supervision of a certified instructor. Their guidance and knowledge of proper form and technique will help you to achieve maximum results while avoiding injuries. They can also help you to safely modify workout activities to match your current fitness levels and goals. Whether you attend classes in a studio or at home through DVDs or streamed videos, the presence of a trained instructor is imperative.
Stretching helps maintain flexibility. We often overlook that in youth, when our muscles are healthier. But aging leads to a loss of flexibility in the muscles and tendons. Muscles shorten and don't function properly. That increases the risk for muscle cramps and pain, muscle damage, strains, joint pain, and falling, and it also makes it tough to get through daily activities, such as bending down to tie your shoes.
In parallel, Prussian nationalist and exercise instructor Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778–1852) advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Jahn invented the standard equipment of modern gymnastics; the parallel bars, rings, balance beam, horse, and horizontal bar4 Bakewell S. Illustrations from the Wellcome Institute Library: Medical gymnastics and the Cyriax collection. Med Hist. 1997;41:487–95.10.1017/S0025727300063067[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] and in 1811, founded the Physical Culture Movement in Germany.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Ling and Jahn’s Physical Culture gained following and flourished in gymnasiums throughout Europe and later in the United States of America until the end of the 19th century. However, toward the end of the century, the original concept of harmonious interaction between the competitive and holistic exercise systems eroded and deteriorated. This was due to the late 19th century shift in the gymnasium environment toward harsh paramilitary style training.9–11 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890.
The second aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Firstly, the absence of isometric KF MVC torque decrease confirms that our exercise only solicits the knee extensors and does not involve the knee flexors. Secondly, EMG RMS measured during KE MVCs shortly after exhaustion and during the recovery period was not altered by high intensity OLDE, confirming the results of a previous study [8]. Therefore, as a decrease in knee extensors force production capacity can be observed without concomitant changes in EMG signal, our data combined with the data of a previous study [8] suggest that EMG signal cannot be used to investigate dynamic exercise-induced muscle fatigue. The lack of changes in EMG signal is likely to be caused by a potentiation of the maximal evoked muscular wave (M-wave) induced by high intensity OLDE [8]. Finally, according to our hypothesis, isokinetic KE MVC torque quickly recovered and plateaued after exhaustion (within ~ 30 s at 60 and 100 deg/s, and within ~ 50 s at 140 deg/s). This quick recovery in torque production capacity is likely to be associated with recovery in both central and peripheral fatigue. This assumption is supported by one previous study in our laboratory demonstrating that not only peripheral and central fatigue, but also cortical and spinal excitability recovered shortly after exhaustion [8]. Froyd et al. [32] also demonstrated a significant recovery in skeletal muscle function within 1–2 minutes after completion of a one-leg isokinetic time trial performed at high intensity. Taking all together, these results demonstrate that to fully appreciate the extent of neuromuscular alterations induced by high intensity dynamic exercise, assessment of muscle fatigue must be performed within 30 s of cessation of the exercise.

Yet some of the best physical activities for your body don't require the gym or ask you to get fit enough to run a marathon. These "workouts" can do wonders for your health. They'll help keep your weight under control, improve your balance and range of motion, strengthen your bones, protect your joints, prevent bladder control problems, and even ward off memory loss.

Exercise tests were performed on a cycle ergometer (Lode Excalibur Sport, Groningen, The Netherlands) or on a treadmill (Ergo ELG 55; Woodway, Weil am Rhein, Germany) depending on the sport. Tests on the cycle ergometer started with an initial workload of 80 W (subjects 6 and 7) or 30 W (subjects 4 and 9), the workload was increased by 40 W every 3 min. Tests on the treadmill started at 5.4 km h−1, the speed was increased with 1.8 km h−1 each 3 min (subjects 1, 2, 3, 8 and 10). One subject performed the treadmill test with an inclination of 1% (subject 5). The duration of each test was recorded in seconds. Subjects wore a heart rate monitor (Polar Accurex Plus, Kempele, Finland) for determination of maximal heart rate (HRmax) throughout the exercise tests. After each exercise test, 20 μl of blood was drawn from the right earlobe to determine maximal blood lactate concentration ([La]max) with enzymatic analysis (EKF; Biosen 5030, Barleben, Germany).
The positive trend shown here is an encouraging result in this population in relation to the possibility of increasing their ability in performing daily activities, reducing the occurrence of falls and potential femoral fractures. Further research is needed to understand how to design a vigorous exercise protocol, which may focus not only on aerobics but also on the different skills assessed by the SFT and which may include specific training sessions to enhance those particular skills, such as 8-foot up and go test. To maximize the functional/physical capacities of those over 65, a close link between high-intensity exercise and functional exercises is required. A mixed circuit training program including both kinds of the aforementioned exercises and measurable by SFT should be followed.
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