Our huge database of exercise guides are broken up into specific muscle groups and exercise categories. If you’re looking to work on toning up your butt, just choose this muscle group from the list and you’re all set. If you are interested in getting started using kettlebells, then choose this option from the exercise types list and you will have access to over 100 muscle building, fat burning kettlebell exercises! We have included easy to access dropdown lists to choose from along with a detailed “muscle map” below which shows the area of the body where each muscle group is located. Just click on the body part you want to tighten up and you’re on your way to a firmer physique! From free weight exercises using dumbbells and barbells, all the way to bodyweight movements, our extensive database of exercise guides really has a workout solution for anyone who is interested in living a healthier lifestyle.
We have included step by step instructional guides for over 500 different resistance training exercises. This database covers a wide variety of different exercises including free weights, CrossFit, kettlebells, machines, bodyweight, medicine ball, elastic bands, exercise ball, Pilates and stretching movements. Choose from a list for a specific muscle group or select by exercise type to pick the best exercises for your workout. Each instructional page will show you how to properly perform a resistance training exercise with detailed photos and exercise advice for each movement. It’s like having your very own personal trainer. These exercise guides will help set you on the right track so you can get in the best shape of your life!
Start in a low lunge position with right foot forward, left foot back, and fingertips touching the ground for balance. In one smooth movement, bring left foot forward and, as you stand on right foot, continue to lift left knee toward chest and hop up on right foot. Land lightly on right foot and immediately slide left foot behind you to return to starting position. Repeat for half the time then switch to the other side.
The study that kicked off this whole seven-minute workout fad four years ago notes that the secret-sauce is to strategically work different major muscles groups (upper body, lower body, core) each time you do the workout. This allows for one major muscle group to rest while you work the next muscle group, resulting in a super-efficient, super-effective routine.
I found pound at Crunch Fitness when I lived in LA. You had to sign up for the class ahead of time and they would run out of sticks because the classes were so packed (so I ended up buying my own to bring). The live classes were much more fun than the videos, I think because of the music. At the gym, the instructors would play fun current or popular hit songs really loud. In the videos, it’s more focused on instruction than the music, even though they have options for music only –see below.
Results Maximal blood lactate concentration was lower in OTS compared with NFO, while resting concentrations of cortisol, ACTH and prolactin concentrations were higher. However, sensitivity of these measures was low. The ACTH and prolactin reactions to the second exercise bout were much higher in NFO athletes compared with OTS and showed the highest sensitivity for making the distinction.
Amazing workout but it takes hard work and serious dedication! THE hardest workout Ive done, hands down. I never thought a dvd workout you see on late night infomercials would be legit, but this is seriously no joke. If you want your body in serious shape fast and youre willing to make the life changes, this will work! Keep going and just dont stop! Life changing product!
That chronic office slump is a sign that your abs are snoozing; just look at your belly. "Posture is underrated and underutilized when it comes to working our abs," Richey says. His trick: Draw your belly button in as you lift your pelvic floor, as if you were doing a Kegel, to coax your core muscles to start firing together. "Soon, you won't have to consciously think about it," he says. You can do this belly button–pelvic floor "link" several times throughout the day (holding for up to 30 seconds each time) as you're sitting at your desk, in the car, or waiting in line somewhere. (Take the next step in straightening up by tackling this posture workout.)
6.  If an exercise can be done for more than 90 seconds, increase the resistance so that momentary muscular failure occurs within 45 - 90 seconds (this is considered "high-intensity" exercise). If you can do sit-ups for ten minutes, the intensity is insufficient to cross that threshold mentioned above, and you're just wasting valuable physiological resources. If you can't do even one rep, reduce the resistance (i.e. if doing a push-up, change from being on your toes to on your knees, or start from the top and slowly lower yourself; if using a machine, choose a lower setting; if using free-weights, pick a lower weight; if doing a chin-up, use a chair to boost yourself up to the top, then take your feet off the chair and slowly lower yourself).
Flexibility exercise, or stretching, is a vital component of any exercise regimen. The primary purpose of flexibility training is to increase your range of motion, especially when it comes to muscles and joints. Although flexibility exercise will not improve your endurance or strength as cardio or anaerobic exercise would, flexibility training helps your body maintain its natural alignment. By doing so, flexibility exercise makes your body significantly less prone to injury during cardio or anaerobic exercise. Additionally, practicing flexibility training will increase your freedom of movement in a way that makes everyday activities easier. Tasks such as reaching up for an object on a shelf, getting up from a chair, or even sitting in confined spaces for long periods of time will greatly benefit from flexibility training.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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