“Chronological age is not a good indicator of biological age,” says Balachandran. “Some people who are in their 80s are as agile and vibrant as some in their 60s.” It’s not clear why, he notes. “But I think physical activity could be one overlooked factor.” The body deteriorates with time, yet how quickly and drastically those changes come may be largely up to you.

Not near our studio? That’s okay, The Bloom Method can be implemented into the fitness method or gym workout of your choice. While we offer our studio concept + cutting-edge classes through our online platform, Studio Bloom, we can also help customize our methodology into any way you choose to move your body. Reach out to use and we’ll connect you directly to one of our Bloom coaches for an optimal learning experience.

They’re fun and easy to do: Keep your upper body facing forward while your lower body moves; start with 10 swivels to the right, then 10 to the left. Then do 9 swivels to the right, 9 to the left, then 8 right 8 left, and so on down to one. As each set has your upper body twisting faster and faster, you should feel your abdominal muscles burning and your hips getting loose.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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