I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.
15-Minute HIIT With Maggie Binkley. If you’re looking to get your heart-rate up, but are limited on time, this 15-minute video is for you. Maggie Binkley takes you through these short workouts each day of the week (Monday through Friday), focusing on specific areas on different days, and including a few full-body routines as well. Come Saturday, you’ll be ready to cheers to your accomplishments!
After trying many different workout "schemes" with limited success, I bought this book and began doing Super Slow workouts. I'm now working out 6 times a month, spending less than 30 minutes in the gym for each workout, and I'm stronger than I've ever been. I've never experienced progress like this before. At 45 years old, my leg press has gone from 400 to 820 lbs. in a couple of months. The workouts aren't easy, but they're over quickly, and I'm able to spend more time with my family without feeling like I'm compromisng my health and fitness.
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Exercising in early adulthood is your first step toward staving off osteoporosis, a major risk factor for fractures and frailty. “Your bone density at 30 determines your bone density later in life,” explains Balachandran, whose research focuses on improving physical function in older adults. Sprinting, dancing, and strength training in your teens and 20s stimulate bone growth so you have a larger store to draw from as you age.

To start toning your abs by hitting up the lower abdominal muscles, Riggins suggests 30 seconds of leg raises. Here’s how: Turn on your back with legs straight and your feet and ankles together. Raise your legs up and down in a vertical position from your body, while keeping your belly button. Slowly bring legs back down, but if that is too difficult, tuck your knees. (And be careful not to strain your lower back!)
Mixing up your workout routine from time to time is very important for avoiding the dreaded plateau which is basically your body’s way of saying “I’m bored!” and it’s a big issue with a lot of people who have been on the same workout routine or fitness program for a while and really aren’t seeing the results they want. Your body needs stimulus from a variety of sources which includes everything from different reps and sets schemes to various training styles. If you’re struggling with building muscle mass or you’re having a difficult time losing body fat, then your primary goal should be to mix it up a little and start adding variety into your routines. By doing this you can truly shock your body into change since it will be receiving new stimuli from different sources. Use our extensive exercise guides on this page as a roadmap to help you reach your fitness and physique goals!
Strength conditioning. Start by doing one set of exercises targeting each of the major muscle groups. Bryant suggests using a weight at which you can comfortably perform the exercise eight to 12 times in a set. When you think you can handle more, gradually increase either the weight, the number of repetitions, or number of sets. To maximize the benefits, do strength training at least twice a week. Never work the same body part two days in a row.
5.  Even when you can't complete another repetition, keep trying to complete this "impossible rep". Even though you aren't moving, metabolic work is being done, and a more thorough "inroad" to muscular failure is accomplished. "Pushing to failure" signals the body to upgrade its capabilities ("adaptive response")... something it will not do unless given a good reason to.
Physiological, psychological and EMG responses to the time to exhaustion tests are presented Figs 4 and 5. Leg RPE (Fig 4A), leg muscle pain (Fig 4B) and heart rate (HR, Fig 4C) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Cadence during the time to exhaustion decreased over time (P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for these aforementioned parameters are presented Fig 5. EMG RMS of the VL (Fig 5A), VM (Fig 5B), RF (Fig 5C) and the sum of these muscles (Fig 5D) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for EMG parameters are presented Fig 5. Blood lactate concentration increased (from 1.3 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and blood glucose concentration decreased (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 4.4 ± 0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.001) over time.
We prefer 1-min incremental exercise testing on a cycle ergometer rather than constant work studies because of its speed, repeatability, and ease of identification of the anaerobic threshold. Although values such as VO2 and anaerobic threshold from both types of studies are reported to be comparable, we questioned whether VD/VT and AaPO2, which depend on simultaneous arterial blood and mixed ... [Show full abstract]Read more
The overhead squat requires strength and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: You can take the bar from a squat rack by snatching it overhead or by cleaning and jerking it. The arms should be wider on the bar, very similar to a snatch grip. The feet should be a little outside of shoulder-width. Brace your core, and send your butt back into a squat position while keeping your arms locked overhead. A good cue to think of is “show me your pits” or bending the bar, which automatically externally rotates the shoulders and locks them into a strong position. Once you have reached below parallel, drive your knees out, squeeze your glutes and stand the bar back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders and back.
Stephanie Mansour, weight loss and lifestyle coach for women, has a great way to get your triceps toned while you’re watching TV. Just do 30 tricep dips on your couch. Here’s how: “Hands on edge of couch, fingers facing you. Bend your knees at 90-degree angle, scooting your butt up so it almost touches the couch,” she says. “Bend at the elbows, lower your body down, then press back up and straighten your arms. Repeat for 30 seconds to work on arm flab.”
Exercise is a key part of staying healthy, but figuring out how to get more active can be tough. If you’re not used to physical activity, start slow. Go for 10 to 15 minute walks, and work your way up to briskly walking or jogging for 30 minutes daily. Try adding strengthening exercises 2 or 3 days per week, and consider boosting your flexibility with yoga or Pilates classes. Whenever you work out, always listen to your body’s limits, and ask your doctor for advice if you have a history of any medical issues.

The positive trend shown here is an encouraging result in this population in relation to the possibility of increasing their ability in performing daily activities, reducing the occurrence of falls and potential femoral fractures. Further research is needed to understand how to design a vigorous exercise protocol, which may focus not only on aerobics but also on the different skills assessed by the SFT and which may include specific training sessions to enhance those particular skills, such as 8-foot up and go test. To maximize the functional/physical capacities of those over 65, a close link between high-intensity exercise and functional exercises is required. A mixed circuit training program including both kinds of the aforementioned exercises and measurable by SFT should be followed.
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