I read "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol" back in 2000. Then relatively new to learning about exercise and bodybuilding I found it to be a truly fascinating and very challenging read. Not only was the material challenging in the intellectual sense but also in a philosophical sense. It was turning much of what I believed about "exercise" upside down. So meatheads and gym-rats be warned, "Superslow" is a highly technical book that the typical bodybuilder or exercise enthusiast would find "boring" (see other reviews here on Amazon) because it isn't full of ridiculous promises about gigantic, ripped muscles and marketing jargon for selling supplements. What it is is a very thorough analysis of the variety of benefits one can derive (regardless of their limited genetics) from properly performed exercise and the many proven pitfalls associated with a low-intensity and high workload/volume. The book also provides an in-depth history lesson on the continually evolving refinements to Arthur Jones' Nautilus principles. Hutchins' dogged determination to continually seek a safer and more effective way for people to exercise is admirable and shows his devotion to sound scientific principles.
If you thought two-day free shipping and all access to “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” were the highlights of your Amazon Prime account, you are going to be pleasantly surprised at this other fit feature. Not only can order your yoga pants and earbuds on Amazon Prime, you can actually use it to squeeze in a bit of cardio or stretching anywhere you happen to be.
This Chinese martial art that combines movement and relaxation is good for both body and mind. In fact, it's been called "meditation in motion." Tai chi is made up of a series of graceful movements, one transitioning smoothly into the next. Because the classes are offered at various levels, tai chi is accessible — and valuable — for people of all ages and fitness levels. "It's particularly good for older people because balance is an important component of fitness, and balance is something we lose as we get older," Dr. Lee says.
Whenever I’m feeling overwhelmed and super busy, the first thing that always falls off my schedule is hitting the gym—even though I know making the extra time to sweat it out will make me feel better and more centered. But I’ve realized that you can always find a way to prioritize the things that matter, even if you have to get creative with the way you fit them in.
Recruitment criteria were one or both of sedentariness and dysmetabolism. Thus, we selected subjects who were not physically active or involved in any exercise program; that is, they had a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, before entering the study, they were carefully screened for metabolic problems which attested a dysmetabolic status, as increased levels of plasma glucose, free fatty acids, triglyceride, and urate in fasting state. Both criteria were verified by means of family doctor databases of subjects.
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