To strengthen and tone your abs, Marks says to go with V-Ups. Here’s his instruction: Begin lying on your back with your legs straight and arms extended overhead. Engage your core by pressing your lower back into the ground. Keeping your legs and arms straight, simultaneously lift your legs and torso up, reaching your hands toward your feet. Your body will form a “V.” Slowly lower to the starting position. And if you want an added challenge? Dempsey says “don’t let your arms and legs rest on the ground in between reps.” Ouch! If you’re working this hard (even for just 30 seconds!) don’t undo your efforts by making any of these 30 Flat-Belly Mistakes Women Make.
A typical Pilates class usually lasts around 45 minutes to an hour. You need a fitness mat, water bottle and towel and comfortable clothing. Sometimes other gear such as balls, straps and Pilates-specific equipment is used. While available in most studios offering Pilates classes, these items may also be purchased if desired for home use. Like yoga, you will most likely be barefoot during workouts.

In 1912, Alexander claimed that the principles of ‘conscious control’ constitute an unfailing remedy for disease, including the cases of shortening of the spine, an injured arm, and a golfer who is practicing his swing.21 Pilates and Alexander [Internet]. Macy JA. Alexander Technique and the Pilates method of movement re-education: A biomechanical perspective. 2010 Dec 6 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pilatesandalexander.com/articles/macy/. [Google Scholar] Alexander was against weightlifting, claiming that their focus on isolating muscles did not address the short- and long-term damage of impaired functional movements: ‘The physical body thus had two existences ... one fiercely active, muscular, dynamic, the other sedentary, nervous, static.’21 Pilates and Alexander [Internet]. Macy JA. Alexander Technique and the Pilates method of movement re-education: A biomechanical perspective. 2010 Dec 6 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pilatesandalexander.com/articles/macy/. [Google Scholar] He allied himself with the turn of the 20th century MMB movement emergence:20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar]


Exercise videos are probably one of the most purchased items when it comes to fitness. They are also one of the most likely to end up on the shelves of users due to many different reasons. In many cases, it’s because the user didn’t know what they were getting into when they purchased the exercise videos, so once they got them home and watched them, it turned out it wasn’t what they were looking for at all.
Jump up ^ Pratali L, Mastorci F, Vitiello N, Sironi A, Gastaldelli A, Gemignani A (November 2014). "Motor Activity in Aging: An Integrated Approach for Better Quality of Life". Int. Sch. Res. Notices. 2014: 257248. doi:10.1155/2014/257248. PMC 4897547. PMID 27351018. Research investigating the effects of exercise on older adults has primarily focused on brain structural and functional changes with relation to cognitive improvement. In particular, several cross-sectional and intervention studies have shown a positive association between physical activity and cognition in older persons [86] and an inverse correlation with cognitive decline and dementia [87]. Older adults enrolled in a 6-month aerobic fitness intervention increased brain volume in both gray matter (anterior cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, posterior middle frontal gyrus, and left superior temporal lobe) and white matter (anterior third of corpus callosum) [88]. In addition, Colcombe and colleagues showed that older adults with higher cardiovascular fitness levels are better at activating attentional resources, including decreased activation of the anterior cingulated cortex. One of the possible mechanisms by which physical activity may benefit cognition is that physical activity maintains brain plasticity, increases brain volume, stimulates neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, and increases neurotrophic factors in different areas of the brain, possibly providing reserve against later cognitive decline and dementia [89, 90].
To determine the acute action of cigarette smoking on cardiorespiratory function under stress, the immediate effects of cigarette smoking on the ventilatory, gas exchange, and cardiovascular responses to exercise were studied in nine healthy male subjects. Each subject performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion on two separate days, one without smoking (control) and one after smoking 3 ... [Show full abstract]Read more
An essential move to any workout. Keep in mind that if doing a push-up on your toes is too tough, you can always start on your knees. It’s still a very effective strengthening move. HOW TO DO IT: Begin the push-up in a plank position with your hands on the ground under your shoulders and with your feet together, toes driving into the ground. Your body should be in one straight line with your core locked. Slowly lower yourself down to the ground so that your chest touches the ground, then push yourself back up to the starting position without collapsing your lower back. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, triceps, biceps and core.

This move works best if you use a low bench. With the low bench at your right side, start with knees slightly bent and hips back. Shift weight to left foot then jump over the bench first with right foot, allowing the left foot to follow. Land lightly on right foot first then left foot. Reverse the move, starting with left foot, to return to starting position.
The simplest way to workout at home is to use your own body. There are a variety of effective body weight exercises that can help you build strength, endurance and burn calories. The downside is that, without added resistance, it's tough to work hard enough to really challenge your body and burn calories. One way around that problem? Circuit training. By going from one exercise to the next, without little or no rest, you keep your heart rate up, burn more calories and get the most out of your exercise time.
To try it, choose a medium-heavy weight (50 percent to 70 percent of your one-rep-max, or 1RM, if you know it). Lift it with as much velocity as you can muster, then lower it with control. For instance, if you are bench pressing, the push up will feel almost as though you are punching the weight up into the ceiling. Once you have completed the lift, slowly lower the weight to your chest. You can apply this technique using a variety of implements, including dumbbells, barbells, weight machines, elastic bands, and body weight, he explains.
When shopping, take some extra laps around the store. Instead of making your shopping trip efficient, take your time and stroll around the store a couple times. If that feels too aimless, add an objective of memorizing the store's layout. Or, when grocery shopping, don't group items on your list by type. Instead, randomize the order so that you get one thing from the produce section and then get something from a different section before getting your next produce item.
Neuromuscular function tests were performed pre and post-exercise to quantify muscle fatigue. As previous studies documented the extent of isometric muscle fatigue induced by OLDE [8, 11, 17, 18], we chose to focus only on isokinetic muscle fatigue. Therefore, knee extensors (KE) MVCs were performed at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s pre (after the warm-up) and post-exercise (13 ± 4s after exhaustion). Subjects were asked to perform two maximal isokinetic knee extensions at each angular velocity (starting position corresponded to knee angle at 90 deg; range of motion was the same as the OLDE). The highest peak torque value of the two trials was considered, and a 20 s recovery was set between each set of KE MVCs. The order of contractions was randomized between sessions as follow (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s) and identical for testing pre and post-exercise of the same session. This randomization allows obtaining a time course of KE MVC torque recovery following the time to exhaustion test at each angular velocity was obtained at a different time point at each session: either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). An overview of timing can be found in Fig 1. Twenty seconds after completion of the last KE MVC, a maximal isometric MVC of the knee flexors was performed (isometric KF MVC). Visual feedback of the torque and strong verbal encouragement were provided for each MVC [please see reference 9 for more details].

* Exercise isn't supposed to be fun or enjoyable (that's what recreation is for). Exercise is a means-to-an-end. It shouldn't be something you look forward to, nor should you dread doing it; it should just be part of your lifestyle... like eating or sleeping. If you DO look forward to it, and even crave it, you could be hooked on the endorphin rush you get from doing an activity that is considered by the body to be over-doing it. And since the body would rather you not do this, it would be prudent to respect the body's wishes.
When you upgrade to the paid version, you can also track your weight and visualize your progress, which might help you stay motivated. It also shows a calendar of all of your workouts and lets you see them at a glance. I’ve had this app for three years now and they do a great job of updating it regularly to add new exercises and respond to user requests.
Strength conditioning. Start by doing one set of exercises targeting each of the major muscle groups. Bryant suggests using a weight at which you can comfortably perform the exercise eight to 12 times in a set. When you think you can handle more, gradually increase either the weight, the number of repetitions, or number of sets. To maximize the benefits, do strength training at least twice a week. Never work the same body part two days in a row.

I found pound at Crunch Fitness when I lived in LA. You had to sign up for the class ahead of time and they would run out of sticks because the classes were so packed (so I ended up buying my own to bring). The live classes were much more fun than the videos, I think because of the music. At the gym, the instructors would play fun current or popular hit songs really loud. In the videos, it’s more focused on instruction than the music, even though they have options for music only –see below.
Data were analysed using three different methods: visual inspection, parametric statistics and calculation of sensitivity for both OTS and NFO detection. Because the sample size was rather small (ie, maximal 5 for each group), data were first inspected visually. Parametric statistics and sensitivity calculation were used to support conclusions from visual inspection of the data. For the purpose of visual inspection, we created graphs with averages and SE for both the OTS and the NFO groups.
2. The "For Dummies" series. Any of the "Dummies" series videos (like Shaping up with Weights for Dummies, Pilates for Weight Loss for Dummies and Basic Yoga for Dummies) are usually excellent, says Zurowski. These videos go slowly, explain the workout clearly, and show the exercise from multiple angles. The instructor is always alone, so there are no distractions. Another good feature of this series is that it also shows mistakes to avoid, says Glenna.

Tracing the origins of Western MMB training suggests that the regular practice of movement-harmonizing exercises was embedded in ancient Greek culture.1 Herodotis. The history of Herodotus. New York (NY): Appleman and Company; 1885. [Google Scholar] Calisthenics in Greek means strength and beauty, a combination highlighted in Greek mythology and everyday life. This philosophy engendered sporting activities that were practiced to facilitate self-empowerment and prepare for events such as the Olympic Games or military actions.2 The Atlantic [Internet]. Cheever DW. The Gymnasium (1859). 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1859/05/the-gymnasium/305407/. [Google Scholar] Today, Calisthenics refers to full-body movement exercises benefiting the body and mind by employing functional motions such as bending, stretching, twisting, kicking, jumping, push-ups, sit-ups, and squats.3 Greek Calisthenics Movement [Internet]. History. 2015 Jun 25 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://calisthenics.gr/en/index.html. [Google Scholar]
Exercising stock options should not be a passive event that happens after a given amount of time. It's rather like playing a hand of cards: if your plays are strategic, you'll probably "know when to hold them and when to fold them." Many alternatives and trade-offs need to be considered. But, as always, rules, requirements, and regulations govern this area, and this is where we begin.

In London, the Medical Officer of Thorpe Coombe maternity hospital approved and implemented the St Thomas method in 1940, presented as ‘Training for Childbirth - and After.’26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar] There was also interest from the USA, but this option did not materialize.29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar]
Jump up ^ Rhodes, J. S; Van Praag, H; Jeffrey, S; Girard, I; Mitchell, G. S; Garland Jr, T; Gage, F. H (2003). "Exercise increases hippocampal neurogenesis to high levels but does not improve spatial learning in mice bred for increased voluntary wheel running". Behavioral Neuroscience. 117 (5): 1006–16. doi:10.1037/0735-7044.117.5.1006. PMID 14570550.
Matt Sauerhoff, owner of The LIV Method says one of his favorite, fastest and easiest to do on the go moves is the wall squat. “Start with your back against the wall and your heels about a foot off the wall. Bend your knees and slide down the wall until your legs create a 90-degree angle,” he says. “Make sure your knees are aligned over your toes/laces. Press heels into the floor and focus on contracting your abs, pressing lower back into the wall so it’s flat. Hold for 30 seconds.” Combine it with these 30 Fat-Burning Foods and you’ll be melting the fat in no time!
Ever notice how dancers have killer abs, despite never hitting the floor for crunches? There’s a reason for that — every move a dancer makes engages their abs. This quick workout with Heather Graham of BeFit walks you through the moves you need to shake your body like a dancer while getting an effective core workout, not to mention your fair share of cardio. This is a low-impact routine perfect for those just getting back into exercise.

Multiple component community-wide campaigns are frequently used in an attempt to increase a population's level of physical activity. A 2015 Cochrane review, however, did not find evidence supporting a benefit.[122] The quality of the underlying evidence was also poor.[122] However, there is some evidence that school-based interventions can increase activity levels and fitness in children.[15] Another Cochrane review found some evidence that certain types of exercise programmes, such as those involving gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks, can improve balance in older adults.[123] Following progressive resistance training, older adults also respond with improved physical function.[124] Survey of brief interventions promoting physical activity found that they are cost-effective, although there are variations between studies.[125]
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The best 7-minute workouts on the planet are the ones you’ll actually do. This is what I know for sure after testing out more than 30 of them over the past few months. That and yes, they really do work. Adding in short blasts of high intensity interval (HIIT) training consisting of various strength, cardio, core, and flexibility exercises whenever I have a spare seven minutes in my day, have helped me get stronger, leaner, faster, and to feel better overall.

Weighing yourself and keeping an exercise journal are two ways to track your progress, but taking your measurements (chest, arms, waist, hips) will give you a little more information. For example, you may be losing inches even if your scale weight doesn't change. In that case, monitoring your measurements every few weeks can reassure you that you are, in fact, slimming down.
Since this move is more difficult, you may sometimes use a kipping motion to propel your body higher into the air in order for your chest to touch the bar. HOW TO DO IT: Start by hanging from a secured bar with your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. While squeezing the traps together and engaging the abs, pull yourself up to the bar and touch your chest to the bar. MUSCLES USED: Back, core, shoulders and chest.
Mix-and-match interval training works magic in Natalie Jill's Rev4 Rev It Up. The four 10-minute routines hit different trouble zones so you can do them as stand-alones—"I definitely felt I got a good workout after each," one tester said—or combine them for a total-body session. Testers loved that they could "switch things up for time-pressed mornings" and gave props to instructor Jill's "nice energy." Expect a variety of planks and booty-shaping moves.
Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854.  Ling founded the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute in Stockholm in 1822, was an elected member of the Swedish General Medical Association, member of the Swedish Academy, and a Titular Professor. However, Ling remained indifferent to these honors due to the lack of the establishment’s implementation of his methods.7 Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854. [Google Scholar]
* Strength building exercises will improve cardiopulmonary efficiency. The cardiopulmonary system exists to service the musculature (among other things). You "get at" the cardiopulmonary system through the skeletal muscles. When demands are made of the musculature which strengthen it, all systems that service the musculature will be strengthened accordingly. The cardiopulmonary system doesn't care what exercise you do. (However, the joints, ligaments, and tendons do; and while they don't mind the occasional sprint, they'd rather you not pound them with high-force activities for hours-on-end.) If the exercise protocol outlined above results in excellent cardiopulmonary fitness, why would you want to do more than you need to do? (And there are studies which suggest that doing more than you need is actually harmful to the heart!)

Several exercises from Week 1 are carried over to Week 2, but one move is added to each bodypart routine—with the exception of abs—so you can train all muscle groups more completely from multiple angles. Chest, for example, includes two exercises: One is a compound movement (dumbbell bench press) that involves multiple joints (both the shoulder and elbow) to work the largest amount of muscle possible, and the other is an isolation exercise (dumbbell flye) that involves only one joint (shoulder) and targets the pecs to a greater extent. (When doing presses for chest, the deltoids and triceps are involved to a degree, meaning presses don’t isolate the pecs as much as flyes do.)
Also important to know is how to determine how much weight you should use. Start with a light weight and perform a set. Continue adding weight until you can do the desired number of reps with good form, which includes moving slowly enough that you're using muscle—and not momentum—to lift the weight. The last rep should be difficult, but not impossible, and you should be able to keep good form while doing it.
This section outlines the shared characteristics of the six aforementioned MMB pioneers. They all elaborated in length on their philosophy and exercises from a personal perspective, leading to a similar notion that the innate ability to stand and move harmoniously as a normal manner provides multiple advantages. These include physical and mental health, reduced movement-based symptoms, prevention and optimal injury and sickness recovery, enhanced physical performance, retention of the natural human form, and the ability to control the harmonious body rather than acquired movement impairments.
Perception of effort, defined as “the conscious sensation of how hard, heavy, and strenuous exercise is” [23, 24], was measured during the incremental test (at the end of each minute) and during the time to exhaustion tests (at the end of the warm-up and every 30 s) using the 15 points RPE scale (Borg 1998). Standardized instructions for the scale were given to each subject before the warm-up. Briefly, subjects were asked to rate how hard they were driving their leg during the exercise (leg RPE [8, 24, 25]). Subjects were also asked to not use this rating as an expression of leg muscle pain (i.e., the intensity of hurt that a subject feels in his quadriceps muscles only).
Tip: Be sure you know which methods of exercise your company allows, and understand the tax consequences discussed in the third, fourth, and fifth articles in this series. Check the stock plan documents for each stock option grant, and complete necessary paperwork before the date you intend to exercise. Ask the stock plan administrator (or appropriate person) for exercise procedures pertaining to each method. Not all companies may have written procedures.

Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
Use our illustrated exercise guide to discover new exercises to try in your workouts, learn which muscle groups different exercises target and how to perform them correctly. The clear images show correct form and the written instructions will guide you through the exercise movement. Want to build your own workouts with these exercises? You can do exactly that and much more with a Fit account. Check it out and start your free trial today!
These leisurely pursuits have their place, but there’s no substitute for the intensity of intervals and strength training or plyometrics. “When you reduce your intensity, athletic performance declines,” he says. “Cardiovascular fitness and other physiological metrics drop off.” Bone density suffers, too — particularly in women. In short, when you stop pushing yourself, you’ll become less fit, less healthy.
No matter where you are, you have time for 30 seconds of what Haley calls “Anywhere Push-Ups.” “This will target chest and triceps. Find a hard surface like kitchen counter or office desk. With both hands on the surface, walk away so that you’re in an elevated push-up position—the further you walk the more challenging the exercise,” she says. “Lower your body down so elbows and shoulders are at a 90-degree angle, push back up and repeat for ten reps.”
Congratulations on your decision to make yourself a priority and commit to a regular workout routine. The addition of physical fitness into your life requires hard work, but yields great rewards. Now, which method should you choose? With the vast choice of fitness workout options available today, it can be overwhelming to know which one is right for you.
The Push Press is a move that incorporates your entire body. While the strict press focuses only on the upper body, the push press incorporates the lower body to drive the bar up overhead. This synchronic movement is great for building power and pure strength. HOW TO DO IT: Start with the bar across your shoulders. Your hands position on the bar should be just slightly outside of your shoulders, and your feet should be shoulder-width apart. Brace your core, dip slightly into a quarter squat and squeeze your glutes while driving the bar up overhead. Complete the movement with your arms in the lockout position overhead. There is only one dip in the push press, and that is when you push the bar overhead. There should not be a second dip at the top of the bar path or that movement would be called a “jerk.” MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, shoulders and core.
“Chronological age is not a good indicator of biological age,” says Balachandran. “Some people who are in their 80s are as agile and vibrant as some in their 60s.” It’s not clear why, he notes. “But I think physical activity could be one overlooked factor.” The body deteriorates with time, yet how quickly and drastically those changes come may be largely up to you.
Eight healthy and moderately active (a minimum of 2 h of aerobic activity per week) adults (mean ± SD; age: 22 ± 2 yrs, height: 171 ± 8 cm, weight: 69 ± 8 kg, 5 males and 3 females) volunteered to participate in this study. None of the subjects had any known mental or somatic disorder. Each subject gave written informed consent prior to the study. Experimental protocol and procedures were approved by the local Ethics Committee of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Kent at Medway (Ethic clearance Prop97_2013_14). The study conformed to the standards set by the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki “Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects” (2008). All subjects were given written instructions describing all procedures related to the study.
Yet some of the best physical activities for your body don't require the gym or ask you to get fit enough to run a marathon. These "workouts" can do wonders for your health. They'll help keep your weight under control, improve your balance and range of motion, strengthen your bones, protect your joints, prevent bladder control problems, and even ward off memory loss.
I must confess: the title of this section is misleading, because while most of us associate the first home workouts with fitness icons Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons, they were not the first ones to bring workouts inside our homes. In fact, before there were VHS tapes, before there were even televised workouts, there were the audio-only vinyl record workouts, nicknamed vinylcise.
DC-based personal trainer Chris Perrin says to do hip bridges if you want to get your derriere round and toned. “Lie on the floor. With bent legs, place both feet flat on the floor. Both arms down, hands on each side of your hips,” he explains. “Raise your low back off the floor by pushing through the heels of the feet. Once your hips are at their highest point—without straining your back—pause and return your lower back to the floor.” And squeeze those glutes the entire time!

Improving your balance makes you feel steadier on your feet and helps prevent falls. It's especially important as we get older, when the systems that help us maintain balance—our vision, our inner ear, and our leg muscles and joints—tend to break down. "The good news is that training your balance can help prevent and reverse these losses," says Wilson.

The VE group consisted of 8 women and 12 men (age 69.6 ± 3.9 years; weight 70.7 ± 12.1 kg; height 161.3 ± 6.9 cm). The control group consisted of 6 women and 14 men (age 71.2 ± 3.7 years; weight 76.1 ± 12.3 kg; height 167.5 ± 9.8 cm). Only 20 subjects of the VE group and 8 of the control group correctly completed the trials (see Figure 1 and Limitation of the Study paragraph). Adherence to protocol of the VE group was checked daily by our motor scientist by means of a daily record where he noted the week and participation number, the mean HR of the sessions, the type of exercises, and the number of repetitions per set carried out. During the training period, no adverse events such as dizziness, musculoskeletal pain, or cardiovascular issues were recorded. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in strength, flexibility, balance, and agility tested by SFT. T0-T1 differences are shown in Figures ​Figures22 and ​and3.3. Namely, 5 tests out of 6 showed significant improvement: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4; T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6; T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7; T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm; T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm; T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Conversely, the 8-foot up and go test (T0 6.5 ± 7.6 sec; T1 4.5 ± 0.6 sec, p > 0.05) showed no significant statistical difference due to a high SD in T0 assessment.
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