In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
So you think you can't dance? Now you can—and get "a good cardio workout," one reviewer said, to boot. You'll quickly love the hip-hop mix that makes up the 45-minute sesh in Groov3's Dance Sweat Live. The easy-to-learn choreography is broken down step-by-step for newbies before each sequence, "which allows you to gain confidence in your dancing as if nobody's watching" but hustles along so that "you're sweating" by the time you get into the rhythm.
I must confess: the title of this section is misleading, because while most of us associate the first home workouts with fitness icons Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons, they were not the first ones to bring workouts inside our homes. In fact, before there were VHS tapes, before there were even televised workouts, there were the audio-only vinyl record workouts, nicknamed vinylcise.
Thanks for reading the fine print. About the Wiki: We don't accept sponsorships, free goods, samples, promotional products, or other benefits from any of the product brands featured on this page, except in cases where those brands are manufactured by the retailer to which we are linking. For our full ranking methodology, please read about us, linked below. The Wiki is a participant in associate programs from Amazon, Walmart, Ebay, Target, and others, and may earn advertising fees when you use our links to these websites. These fees will not increase your purchase price, which will be the same as any direct visitor to the merchant’s website. If you believe that your product should be included in this review, you may contact us, but we cannot guarantee a response, even if you send us flowers.
To measure exercise type the participants were instructed to choose from the following response options: walking, jogging, cycling, dancing, cross-country skiing, swimming, golf, resistance training and an open-ended response option. Answers in the open-ended response option were categorized into: combined endurance and resistance training, other type of endurance training (e.g. treadmill, aerobic), domestic activities (e.g. housework, gardening), and other (e.g. bowling, horseback riding). Golf was categorized as “other” due to a low response rate (0.5% of the total number of exercise sessions).
A simple example of an eccentric contraction is to hold something in your hand with your elbow bent. Slowly allow your elbow to straighten out while holding the weight.  You can visualize your bicep muscle lengthening as you are holding the weight while you are slowly straightening your elbow.  This is an eccentric contraction or eccentric loading of your bicep muscle.
Rake those leaves. Raking is already an excellent calorie-burning activity, so do it! Raking is not only great for your yard and lawn, but also for your body. Because your core (your back and abdomen) has to work to stabilize your body while your arms are maneuvering the rake, raking is good exercise for both your arms and core. Weirdly, there's a page all about raking as a workout, which you can read here.
What is your current fitness level? – knowing where you are fitness wise may be a hard thing for some to admit, but answering yourself honestly will ensure that you don’t start off with videos you may not even be able to keep up with not to mention finish. There is nothing more discouraging than getting an exercise video and then finding out that you can’t even handle their warm up. The most important thing to keep in mind is that just because you may be starting off at the very beginner’s level, you certainly don’t have to stay there. The more you exercise the stronger you will get and the more your fitness level will increase. It didn’t take over night to end up where you’re starting from so you shouldn’t expect yourself to fix it over night as well.
Most people instinctively move weights very quickly - they jerk upwards, lower the weight without much control, and tense up and use momentum to "bounce" the weight at both ends of the repetition. The instinct serves a purpose - the speed and bounce at the ends do allow heavier weight to be moved. In competitive weightlifting both explosive speed and momentum are essential.

Static Hold. Static holds are familiar to some as a great strengthening technique used in yoga. They can be performed with bodyweight movements — get in the top of a plank or a deep squat position and hold — or they can be done by holding weights (in a slightly contracted position or with full lock out). Our tip? Time how long you can hold a plank to see improvement from week to week.
11. De Vries N. M., van Ravensberg C. D., Hobbelen J. S. M., Olde Rikkert M. G. M., Staal J. B., Nijhuis-van der Sanden M. W. G. Effects of physical exercise therapy on mobility, physical functioning, physical activity and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults with impaired mobility, physical disability and/or multi-morbidity: a meta-analysis. Ageing Research Reviews. 2012;11(1):136–149. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2011.11.002. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]
Limitation of the Study. One potential limit of the present study undoubtedly regards the limited number of subjects involved in the study and the operating loss of the control group. Unfortunately, too many participants of the latter did not satisfy the requirements during the study, thus impeding a comparative statistical approach. Further studies are therefore needed to confirm our conclusions, in particular with a larger sample and control group.
×