When performed at high intensity until exhaustion, OLDE has been shown to induce both peripheral and central fatigue [11, 17, 18]. However, as the exercise performed in these studies did not take place on the same ergometer where neuromuscular function was tested, the extent of peripheral and central fatigue remained unclear. To avoid the need to transfer the participant from the exercising ergometer to the dynamometer (to assess muscle fatigue), we recently developed in our laboratory a OLDE protocol on a dynamometer, reducing the time delay between cessation of the exercise and start of neuromuscular testing [8]. In this study, we demonstrated that both peripheral and central fatigue significantly recovered between exhaustion and after three minutes, but also that high intensity OLDE alters cortical and spinal excitability. Previous studies [8, 11, 17, 18] describing muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE focused only on isometric muscle fatigue (i.e. muscle fatigue measured during isometric contractions) and did not describe the extent of isokinetic muscle fatigue (i.e. muscle fatigue measured during isokinetic contractions) and its recovery. Consequently, an additional aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery induced by high intensity OLDE.
1. Most studies claiming to debunk Super Slow are nonsense. A new Super Slow trainee, or someone particularly elderly or frail uses as many as 10 repetitions per exercise - over 3 minutes of time. For normal adults, once they are comfortable with Super Slow, repetition numbers go way down, to 2-4 repetitions for most upper body exercises and 3-6 repetitions for most lower body exercises.

Do you even lift, bro? While putting away groceries, do bicep curls with cans, bottles, or other objects. You can also try holding these objects above your head for ten seconds before putting them away. Alternately, when grocery shopping, opt for a basket instead of a cart when you can. You'll be working out your upper body without even thinking about it.


If sit-ups give you a sore neck, try this alternative. Lie flat with the end of a resistance band or towel tucked under the center of your back. Bend your knees and grab the other end of the band above your head. Inhale and use your ab muscles to slowly peel your body up, letting your head rest against the band. Exhale and return to the starting position. Do five reps, making sure your abs do all the work.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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