Yoga also offers many mental benefits, such as a reduction in stress level. Greater relaxation and reduced stress leads to a host of other positive body changes including an improvement in circulation, sleep and self-confidence. A positive mental outlook also helps to maintain a healthy immune system, which in turn can ward off other serious ailments such as high cholesterol, heart disease and stroke.
For variety, convenience, and more structured home exercise, you can't beat exercise videos. There are workouts for every age, gender, goal and interest and you can workout anytime you like in the privacy of your own home. The best thing about exercise videos: There are thousands upon thousands to choose from, so almost anyone can find a video they like. The worst thing about exercise videos: There are thousands upon thousands to choose from, making the search for the perfect video an overwhelming process.
Besides toning the muscles, Pilates is known for boosting endurance. A wall and small hand-weights are the only necessities for this highly effective exercise. Stand with your back against the wall and feet hip-width apart. Walk the feet out a little, bend the knees, and slide down as if sitting in a chair. Progress in intensity each day until you can get your upper legs parallel to the floor. Raise the arms to shoulder height and hold for 30 seconds. Do two reps.
Ken Hutchins' analysis is not just book theory; it is based on real experience training many, many thousands of subjects over a span of decades. He trained everyone from amateur and professional level athletes and bodybuilders to little old ladies with osteoporosis and also a great many genetically normal/average folks. He assisted Arthur Jones and Ellington Darden at Nautilus Sports Medical Industries where he first refined the Superslow method during a 5 years long clinical trial, the Nautilus Osteoporosis Study at The University of Florida Medical School in Gainesville (the study is mentioned in chapter 8 of the 1990 edition of "The Nautilus Book" by Ellington Darden, a book I highly recommend for beginning HIT practitioners). Hutchins' writing is as dry and clinical as one would expect to find in any textbook about medicine or engineering. It is also filled with rich insight into the intellectual processes and long history of carefully controlled experiments at Nautilus (and later Hutchins' own facilities) that brought Ken Hutchins to his current level of knowledge. His understanding of anatomy, biology, physics, engineering, psychology, history and sociology are all put to good use in this book and should enthrall any reader that possesses solid critical-thinking skills. Understanding the arguments for a distinction of "Exercise vs. Recreation", "The First Definition of Exercise" and "Requirements for Functional Ability" are crucial for everyone that cares even the slightest about the subject of human health, fitness, longevity or quality of life. These are not trivial matters.
Simply put, progressive overload means that you are consistently lifting or pulling a little more each week (or progressively on a schedule that aligns with your capacity). Lifting weight will break down your muscles. However — and this is where the magic happens — when the muscles grow back, they grow back stronger, but only if you are subjecting them to progressive overload.
Recruitment criteria were one or both of sedentariness and dysmetabolism. Thus, we selected subjects who were not physically active or involved in any exercise program; that is, they had a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, before entering the study, they were carefully screened for metabolic problems which attested a dysmetabolic status, as increased levels of plasma glucose, free fatty acids, triglyceride, and urate in fasting state. Both criteria were verified by means of family doctor databases of subjects.
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