It’s no secret that Beyoncé is a crazy-good performer, and while we could never mimic her vocals, with some coaching, we thought we could pick up her dance moves. That’s why we were so excited to discover this video series featuring choreographer Frank Gatson, Jr., who breaks down every portion of Beyoncé’s Let’s Move! campaign, which features a remix of “Get Me Bodied.” Watch the first instructional portion and then the second one to learn the entire routine.
This classic move helps flatten the tummy by using your abs efficiently. Hold on behind the knees, scoop the belly in, and curl down to the floor to get into position. Now curl the head and shoulders up slightly, lower back still pressed to the floor. Pump the arms up and down in small motions at your sides. Breathe in for five and out for five until you hit 50 pumps. Sit up and repeat for a total of 100 pumps.
In line with the previous literature, our study showed that walking was the most common exercise type among older adults [24, 25]. This result is not surprising as walking is among the most cost effective and accessible means of exercise [26]. In addition, walking has been identified as a relatively safe exercise alternative to older adults [25]. We found that walking was the most common exercise type in both training groups. However, the MCT group had a higher proportion of walking sessions than the HIIT group, while the HIIT group had a higher proportion of sessions with for instance jogging and cycling. This might indicate that some older adults in the HIIT group feel that it is easier to achieve a high-intensity level when performing jogging and cycling compared to walking. Absolute workload at a given intensity varies greatly among individuals with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) [27], so that e.g. walking at 5 km/h corresponds to moderate intensity for an individual with relatively high CRF level, while the same speed exhibits near-maximal intensity for an individual with low CRF. Therefore, the type of exercise an individual need to perform in order to achieve a feeling of high intensity varies from one individual to another [27]. Since ageing often results in CRF decline [28], it is likely that many older adults will reach a feeling of high-intensity when walking. However, those with a high CRF level might need to perform other exercise types, for instance jogging and cycling, to reach the same intensity level during their workout session.
Aerobic exercise is any physical activity that uses large muscle groups and causes the body to use more oxygen than it would while resting.[3] The goal of aerobic exercise is to increase cardiovascular endurance.[4] Examples of aerobic exercise include running, cycling, swimming, brisk walking, skipping rope, rowing, hiking, playing tennis, continuous training, and long slow distance training.[3]

CrossFit Games: The sport of fitness has arrived (or so claims Reebok, the official sponsor of the CrossFit Games). Each summer the CrossFit Games test participants with a barrage of physical challenges and workouts, ranging from swimming and running to pull-ups and handstand walks (sorry, Kobayashi, hot-dog eating has yet to make an appearance). Participants accrue points over the events, and the male and female winners are crowned World’s Fittest Man & Woman. Sectional and Regional qualifiers narrow the field before the annual Games Weekend.
The results of this study present evidence in favor of this high intensity OLDE protocol to investigate muscle fatigue and muscle endurance. Indeed, this new protocol developed in our laboratory i) presents a lower variability than other high intensity time to exhaustion tests [20], ii) is not limited by the cardiorespiratory system and iii) allows a quick start of neuromuscular testing to fully appreciate the extent of muscle fatigue induced by the exercise. Therefore, it can provide an interesting tool to isolate the cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular effects of various manipulations supposed to play a role in muscle fatigue and performance during high intensity dynamic endurance exercise (e.g. spinal blockade of afferent feedback from the working muscles).
This is also the point at which exercise becomes more critical. Bone and muscle mass peak at the end of your 20s. Unchecked, sarcopenia, or muscle loss, can claim up to 50 percent of an inactive adult’s muscle tissue by the time he or she reaches 70, according to a 2014 Johns Hopkins University study. Your VO2 max — a measure of how much oxygen your body can process — declines similarly, dropping about 10 percent per decade after around age 30 in healthy sedentary adults of both sexes.
Katy Fraggos, co-Owner and Head Trainer at Perspirology, says you can work your triceps, core, hip flexor, working leg quadriceps, and supporting leg hamstring in just 30 seconds a day with this move. “Start with your hands behind your back on the floor with fingertips pointed in. Working leg lifted with flexed foot. Butt is off the floor,” she says. “When elbows are bent, the knee is pulled into the chest. Arms will straighten as leg kicks outward to the front of the body in a ‘pumping’ action.” Try to complete as many as possible in 30 seconds and then if you have extra time, repeat for 30 seconds with the opposite leg lifted.
With the right stimuli, bone density improves as well, says women’s health expert Belinda Beck, MD, an Arizona-based OB-GYN and researcher. In a recent study she conducted on postmenopausal women, Beck found that “even women with very low bone mass could tolerate the high loading required to increase bone mineral density as long as it was introduced gradually with close attention to technique.”
Keep that resistance band handy for this waist-toning move. Sit with your legs a little more than hip-distance apart. Hold the band between your hands and raise your arms overhead. Exhale as you turn to one side, using the muscles in your waist. Inhale as you reach the arms out and back, keeping the hips in place. Exhale and return to starting position. Alternate for a total of four sets on each side.
Chase Squires is the first to admit that he's no fitness expert. But he is a guy who used to weigh 205 pounds, more than was healthy for his 5'4" frame. "In my vacation pictures in 2002, I looked like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man at the beach," says the 42-year-old Colorado resident. Squires decided enough was enough, cut out fatty food, and started walking on a treadmill. The pounds came off and soon he was running marathons -- not fast, but in the race. He ran his first 50-mile race in October 2003 and completed his first 100-miler a year later. Since then, he's completed several 100-mile, 50-mile, and 50k races.

Most people instinctively move weights very quickly - they jerk upwards, lower the weight without much control, and tense up and use momentum to "bounce" the weight at both ends of the repetition. The instinct serves a purpose - the speed and bounce at the ends do allow heavier weight to be moved. In competitive weightlifting both explosive speed and momentum are essential.


In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
During your workout you have “target” heart rate zones that are expressed as a percentage of your max heart rate. For low-intensity cardio, you want to aim for 60 to 70 percent of your max heart rate, for moderate-intensity cardio the goal is 70 to 85 percent, and for high-intensity cardio, 85 percent or above. This can help you see if you’re really working as hard as you think you are and adjust as needed to make sure you’re hitting your workout goals. Here’s how to calculate your max and target heart rate zones.
If you haven’t strength trained regularly, muscle loss may now reach critical levels, interfering with balance, gait, and other daily activities. But if you take up strength training, those changes are reversible: A number of studies including adults in their 70s have found that progressive strength training two or three times per week can lead to such improvements as increased muscle mass, more ease with everyday activities like climbing stairs and carrying groceries, and reduced joint pain.
One almost overall finding, at least in endurance and strengthendurance athletes having OTS, is a diminished maximal lactate concentration, whereas submaximal values remain unchanged or slightly reduced.10 12 This is confirmed in the present study where OTS patients did not reach maximal lactate concentrations above 8 mmol l−1. Two out of the four NFO patients did not reach [La]max of 8 mmol l−1 at the first exercise test either (for one patient [La]max was missing). Thus, although low [La]max has frequently been described as a diagnostic marker for OTS, from these results, it does not seem sensitive enough to distinguish OTS from NFO.
Simply put, progressive overload means that you are consistently lifting or pulling a little more each week (or progressively on a schedule that aligns with your capacity). Lifting weight will break down your muscles. However — and this is where the magic happens — when the muscles grow back, they grow back stronger, but only if you are subjecting them to progressive overload.
4. Ken Hutchins never advocated working your heart to failure and does NOT disregard cardiovascular fitness. A typical Super Slow workout is maybe 15 minutes of constant, demanding work done in 20-25 minutes of total time. You will finish breathing hard with your pulse pounding. It is the ultimate cardiovascular circuit exercise routine, much more time efficient and less damaging to your joints than jogging or other aerobic exercise.

Recruiting lasted 6 months starting from September 2013. Participants were recruited by means of family doctors to whom the goal of the study was explained. The recruitment flow chart is shown in Figure 1. Three hundred and fifty people aged ≥ 65 were invited to participate. Of these, 51.4% agreed to be included in the screening list while 48.6% refused to participate, mainly for family reasons such as illness/hospitalization/old age of a family member. Forty people were found eligible to participate in the research protocol. Randomly, twenty were assigned to VE and twenty to the control group. The latter were instructed not to take part in any physical activity throughout the study period. All the selected participants signed an informed consent. The study was performed according to the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the local ethics committee on September 23, 2013.
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