In the present study, we measured muscle endurance by completion of time to exhaustion tests where the subject has to maintain a fix workload for as long as possible. All time to exhaustion tests lasted less than ten minutes, confirming that OLDE was performed at high intensity. The duration of the time to exhaustion tests in the present study is in accordance with previous studies using the same exercise on a different ergometer [11, 17, 18]. Relative reliability refers to the degree to which individuals maintain their position in a sample with repeated measurements [30]. The ICC value of 0.795 can be interpreted as a questionable reliability (ICC < 0.8), close to the threshold for good reliability (0.8 < ICC < 0.9) [19]. However, as no consensus really exists on threshold to interpret ICC results [31], the practical significance of its value has to be determined with caution by the readers according to their future use of the present protocol. Absolute reliability refers to the degree to which repeated measurements vary for individuals [30]. Traditionally, time to exhaustion tests are known to present a greater CV (CV > 10%) than time trials (i.e. subjects has to perform the greater amount of work possible in a fixed time/distance; CV < 5%) [20]. Interestingly, in our study the CV is below 10%, confirming the great reliability of our novel high intensity OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance, this despite the small sample size, chosen to be in accordance with previously published studies using the same protocol [8, 11, 17]. This great reliability is confirmed by the typical error of measurement value of 0.30 min, corresponding to 5% of the averaged performance value. Finally, as the typical error of measurement value was slightly above the smallest worthwhile change calculated (0.28 min), it is unlikely that our novel high intensity OLDE protocol can be used to detect small differences in performance.

Toning the upper back is the fast track to better posture. This move uses the reformer with an accessory called a long box. Lie on your stomach with your chest just past the edge of the long box. Grab the straps in front of you with straight arms. Lift the head and chest as you pull the straps down toward your hips. The long box will slide forward, with you on top. Release the arms back to the starting position. Do five reps.
Former ballet dancer and Ballet Beautiful founder Mary Helen Bowers has serious fitness cred thanks to training Natalie Portman for her role in Black Swan. With this free workout video, she takes her expertise outside the dance studio. The 15-minute mat workout will help tone your lower body with graceful ballet-inspired movements like bridge variations.
This classic move helps flatten the tummy by using your abs efficiently. Hold on behind the knees, scoop the belly in, and curl down to the floor to get into position. Now curl the head and shoulders up slightly, lower back still pressed to the floor. Pump the arms up and down in small motions at your sides. Breathe in for five and out for five until you hit 50 pumps. Sit up and repeat for a total of 100 pumps.
Tracy Anderson: The Method For Beginners. Choose from a handful of workout DVDs from this celebrity trainer. She’ll have you working up a sweat doing cardio or more targeted moves for the arms, legs, and core. Anderson’s queue of videos range from about $2.99 to $9.99. Considering that Anderson has her own collection of studios across the globe that run about $45 per class, this is a steal!

This classic move helps flatten the tummy by using your abs efficiently. Hold on behind the knees, scoop the belly in, and curl down to the floor to get into position. Now curl the head and shoulders up slightly, lower back still pressed to the floor. Pump the arms up and down in small motions at your sides. Breathe in for five and out for five until you hit 50 pumps. Sit up and repeat for a total of 100 pumps.
SOURCES: Liz Neporent, video creator; president, Wellness 360 corporate wellness consulting firm, New York. Wendy Glenna, American Council on Exercise-certified fitness instructor; physical education teacher; fitness video reviewer, Collage Video, Minneapolis, Minn. Paula Zurowski, ACE-certified personal trainer; fitness video reviewer, Richmond, Calif.
Go online for more information, recommends certified personal trainer Paula Zurowski. Web sites like collagevideo.com or Zurowski's exercisevideosreviews.com offer detailed descriptions and ratings of fitness videos. Collage even offers a one-minute clip of most videos, so you can get a feel for the level of the workout and whether you're going to like the instructor.

Cutting drills, running through an agility ladder, using hurdles and cones to practice footwork—these all develop that combo of speed, coordination, balance, and power called agility. They all also require and build core strength. Do this drill for one minute: Place four cones (or plastic cups) eight feet apart in a square and run up, shuffle right, run back, and shuffle left around the square, then reverse the direction. Repeat.


My fitness goal is strength and powerlifting, so I focus on strength training, specifically on four main lifts: Overhead Press, Deadlift, Bench Press and Squat. I have a laundry list of accessory exercises I do that support muscle development in critical areas for the main lifts and strength in general. It’s been working pretty well, but I recently got to a point where I wanted to do more exercise that required movement and fast-paced work. Now I do three days of strength and two days of conditioning. My conditioning days are similar to the circuit training workouts mentioned above and one day, in particular, includes more aerobic conditioning to improve that area specifically. There’s no point in being strong if you can’t also move well!

Outdoors in nearby area and in nature was the most frequently reported exercise location in both training groups. This finding is in line with previous studies reporting that older adults prefer to exercise close to home [23, 30] and outdoors [23]. Interestingly, outdoors was the most common exercise location in both warmer and colder months despite the fact that colder months in Norway consist of more snow, higher prevalence of ice and relatively fewer hours of daylight compared to warmer months. The HIIT group had a higher proportion of sessions at a gym and sport facility compared to the MCT group. This finding is likely related to the fact that the HIIT group reported a higher proportion of sessions with exercise types commonly performed at these locations (e.g. swimming and other types of endurance training) compared to the MCT group. Some older adults might feel that it is easier to reach a high-intensity level with activities located at a gym and sports facility compared to outdoors.

These leisurely pursuits have their place, but there’s no substitute for the intensity of intervals and strength training or plyometrics. “When you reduce your intensity, athletic performance declines,” he says. “Cardiovascular fitness and other physiological metrics drop off.” Bone density suffers, too — particularly in women. In short, when you stop pushing yourself, you’ll become less fit, less healthy.
16.  Make sure you stay hydrated! Even mild dehydration hampers recovery. The drink of choice? Water! And for mineral replacement, especially sodium, I make sure my diet includes various amounts of celery, romaine lettuce, and a nutritional adjunct to the diet, a powdered barley grass juice called Daily Green Boost (if the foods I eat are grown in soils that are sodium insufficient, I won't get enough sodium, and if those foods that are supposed to be good sources of sodium don't taste savory, they are grown in sub-par soils).
For some, it’s the ultimate quest for physical preparedness; for others, the very thought of CrossFit makes them want to puke. Either way, CrossFit is making an undeniable impact in the fitness world, with followers tackling muscle-ups, Fran, and the infamous Filthy Fifty. So whether you're off to the nearest “box” or tuning in to the CrossFit Games on ESPN, here’s the need-to-know lingo for any and every WOD.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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