Who says you have to jump, grunt, strain and punish your body to get amazing results from your workout? Not with PiYo. PiYo combines the muscle-sculpting, core-firming benefits of Pilates with the strength and flexibility advantages of yoga. And, we crank up the speed to deliver a true fat-burning, low impact workout that leaves your body looking long, lean and incredibly defined.
It's important to note that you can spread your activity into intervals as short as 10 minutes. So if you have a very busy schedule, even doing three, 10-minute aerobic exercises per day, five days per week, will be sufficient. To get you started, here are the different types of exercise, how they benefit the body and what kind of activities they entail:

How to: Facing down, place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Place your toes on the floor. If that's too hard, start with your knees on the floor. Your body should make a straight line from shoulders to knees or feet. Keep your rear-end muscles and abs engaged. Bend your elbows to lower down until you almost touch the floor. Lift back up by pushing through your elbows, Keep your torso in a straight line throughout the move.
Endurance performance (i.e. exercise duration > 1 min) is extensively studied in exercise physiology using cycling and/or running exercise (e.g. [1–4]). Despite being close to real competition events by involving the whole-body, the use of cycling and/or running exercise presents some important limitations to understand the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance. Indeed, as whole-body exercise involves greater systemic responses than isolated exercise [5], it is difficult to interpret some specific experimental manipulations aiming to understand CNS processes regulating muscle fatigue and endurance performance (e.g. manipulation of III-IV muscle afferents [6, 7]). Furthermore, due to the need to transfer the participant from the treadmill/bicycle to the ergometer, the true extent of muscle fatigue at exhaustion is underestimated [8], leading to inconclusive results on how peripheral (i.e. fatigue produced by changes at or distal to the neuromuscular junction [9]) and central (i.e. decrease in maximal voluntary activation level [9]) components of muscle fatigue might interact between each other’s (for review see [2, 9]). Therefore, due to the aforementioned limitations, the development of a new exercise model is required to better investigate the CNS processes regulating endurance performance.
CrossFit Games: The sport of fitness has arrived (or so claims Reebok, the official sponsor of the CrossFit Games). Each summer the CrossFit Games test participants with a barrage of physical challenges and workouts, ranging from swimming and running to pull-ups and handstand walks (sorry, Kobayashi, hot-dog eating has yet to make an appearance). Participants accrue points over the events, and the male and female winners are crowned World’s Fittest Man & Woman. Sectional and Regional qualifiers narrow the field before the annual Games Weekend.
To shake up your strength workout, replace the everyone-does-'em moves (crunches, etc.) with this fresh routine created by Dixon. Do this series two to three times per week, alternating with cardio days; you'll start to see results in as little as two to three weeks. Each move hits the same major muscle groups as the old standbys, but challenges them more, giving you a stronger, sleeker body in the same amount of time. So it's efficient—in the best way possible.

You may commit to crunches and planks, Pilates and yoga, all in an effort to target your abs, which they do, but don't stop there. Broaden your "rep"ertoire to include some of these other types of moves and methods (some of which you can do at your desk), and suddenly your core is being challenged with every motion—even though your mind is never on your middle. (Just don't forget abs are made in the kitchen too. Steer clear of these foods to prevent bloating.)
These small exercises may sound like a lot to remember, but you can just start one-at-a-time until each thing becomes a true habit. The trick is to associate exercises with mini-cues. Tell yourself that “If I take the elevator three floors or lazily brush my teeth without squatting, then I am missing a huge opportunity for growth.” Once you have internalized these habits and associated them with a cue, you won’t really have to think about exercising at all.  It just happens.

You’ll begin the program with a full-body training split, meaning you’ll train all major bodyparts in each workout (as opposed to “splitting up” your training). Train three days this first week, performing just one exercise per bodypart in each session. It’s important that you have a day of rest between each workout to allow your body to recover; this makes training Monday, Wednesday and Friday—with Saturday and Sunday being rest days—a good approach.
Jane Fonda’s Original Workout. The original. The classic. The one and only. Jane Fonda! Throwback your fitness routine (and break out the leg warmers!) with a workout video from this ‘80s exercise genius. Fonda will take you through aerobics, strength, and flexibility movements with options for beginners and advanced. The video is available for $9.99.
But…. I am not sure why, but I am finding lunges virtually impossible!! I am practicing but even static lunges with just my body weight are so hard to do, I am also only feeling them in the front of my leg. I know to keep 90 degree angles, not to bend forward at the waist and not to extend my knee forward of my foot, so I am wondering if maybe my hamstrings are just pathetically weak or something?!?

The Bloom Method promises to always provide you with the most innovative tools to stay connected to your body as it changes, better prepare you for childbirth, and promote a speedy recovery helping you to achieve your post-birth goals. Our team of experts is constantly staying up to date on the most informative education + studies to ensure that what we provide is top-notch.
In the present study, we measured muscle endurance by completion of time to exhaustion tests where the subject has to maintain a fix workload for as long as possible. All time to exhaustion tests lasted less than ten minutes, confirming that OLDE was performed at high intensity. The duration of the time to exhaustion tests in the present study is in accordance with previous studies using the same exercise on a different ergometer [11, 17, 18]. Relative reliability refers to the degree to which individuals maintain their position in a sample with repeated measurements [30]. The ICC value of 0.795 can be interpreted as a questionable reliability (ICC < 0.8), close to the threshold for good reliability (0.8 < ICC < 0.9) [19]. However, as no consensus really exists on threshold to interpret ICC results [31], the practical significance of its value has to be determined with caution by the readers according to their future use of the present protocol. Absolute reliability refers to the degree to which repeated measurements vary for individuals [30]. Traditionally, time to exhaustion tests are known to present a greater CV (CV > 10%) than time trials (i.e. subjects has to perform the greater amount of work possible in a fixed time/distance; CV < 5%) [20]. Interestingly, in our study the CV is below 10%, confirming the great reliability of our novel high intensity OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance, this despite the small sample size, chosen to be in accordance with previously published studies using the same protocol [8, 11, 17]. This great reliability is confirmed by the typical error of measurement value of 0.30 min, corresponding to 5% of the averaged performance value. Finally, as the typical error of measurement value was slightly above the smallest worthwhile change calculated (0.28 min), it is unlikely that our novel high intensity OLDE protocol can be used to detect small differences in performance.

Start by lying on your back with your feet flat on the floor and your head resting in the palm of one hand and the other hand reaching toward your knees. Press your lower back down. Contract your abdominal muscles (abs) and in one smooth move, raise your head, then your neck, shoulders, and upper back off the floor. Tuck in your chin slightly. Lower back down and repeat.
Flexibility is a factor in yoga, but it is not a necessary for beginner classes. Continued practice over time will increase your agility and flexibility. You can see positive results over time even if you only attend an hour a week, but attending classes around 2-3 times per week will help you experience the most benefits. Yoga classes usually last around an hour from warm-up to cool down.
If you've been to yoga before, you'll recognize this as a near chaturanga—but a little faster. Start in a down dog position with hands on the ground, hips high in the air, and feet on the ground so you form a triangle shape. In a fluid motion, dive head toward the floor, coming into a low push-up position, and then swoop chest forward and up so you end in an upward dog position. From there, push hips up to return to starting position.

We’ve gone on the record with our love of MMA conditioning exercises, and that’s why we bookmarked this video. Even the warm-up is jam-packed with explosive movements that’ll get your heart pumping (think high knees and walking front kicks). And once you move into the actual workout, you’re in for even more high-energy exercises, like hopping front kicks, that are sure to condition your body from head to toe.


More recently, exercise was regarded as a beneficial force in the 19th century. After 1860, Archibald MacLaren opened a gymnasium at the University of Oxford and instituted a training regimen for 12 military officials at the university. This regimen was later assimilated into the training of the British Army.[145] Several mass exercise movements were started in the early twentieth century as well. The first and most significant of these in the UK was the Women's League of Health and Beauty, founded in 1930 by Mary Bagot Stack, that had 166,000 members in 1937.[146]
Rotator cuff impingement syndrome (RCIS) is a multifactored disease that can lead to functional limitations and an inability to participate in work, leisure, and sporting activities. This syndrome can be caused by many factors, such as weakness of the rotator cuff and periscapular muscles, decreased pectoral and rotator cuff muscle flexibility, abnormal motion patterns, extrinsic factors (eg, vibration exposure, use of hand tools, work-station height), and trauma. Kuhn provided a valuable synopsis of randomized controlled clinical trials in which the benefit of exercise for individuals with RCIS was examined. Substantial evidence1 exists to support the use of exercise for the management of this patient population. In addition, manual therapy has been shown1 to augment the effectiveness of exercise. However, we believe it is premature to label the proposed rehabilitation protocol as a criterion standard because of the lack of specific exercise descriptions, variability in the exercise programs, and inability to separate the effects of specific exercises on the measured outcomes that Kuhn noted. Furthermore, because RCIS is multifactored, use of the same exercise protocol to treat everyone with RCIS might not be the best standard of care.
In her hilarious, naked, and explicitly honest anecdote, she described her aversion to most fitness regimens ("I can't run because I piss myself . . . and fart at the same time"), her DVD workout — "Charlotte's 3-Minute Belly Blitz" — and her complete surprise at the intensity of the routine ("THAT'S the f*cking WARMUP?"). To be honest, most of us have been there, so this is pretty damn relatable.
Once you become more comfortable with the technique, you can try it while sitting up. Chickedantz says it will change your body by alleviating anxiety and stress, fix your posture, alleviate pain and strengthen abdominal and intestinal muscles. On a similar note, you can make the most of your stuck-in-a-seat time with these 21 Tricks to Lose Weight While Sitting Down!
Squat Jacks are a surefire way to tone your legs and butt ,as well as your inner and outer thighs and provide a serious cardio blast and calorie burn in just 30 seconds. Marks says to do the following: Begin in a squat position, with your feet slightly wider than hip-width and place your hands behind your head, elbows wide. Keeping your core engaged, jump your feet in together, while maintaining a squat position. Quickly jump your feet back wide to the starting position. Be sure to keep your knees behind your toes the entire time.
Yoga, which when translated from Sanskrit means “to control” or “to unite,” is said to have originated in India thousands of years ago. While its origins are based upon religion, many yoga classes today focus more on the connection between mind, body and spirit and achieving a balance within the body. Yoga concentrates heavily on body awareness, breathing and stretching.
Your heart rate refers to how many beats per minute (BPM) your heart is pumping, and when it comes to working out, knowing your heart rate can help determine if you’re working at the right intensity. You have your resting heart rate, which is how fast your heart is beating when you’re doing nothing (the best way to measure this is to take your pulse first thing in the morning). Generally speaking, this gets lower as you get more fit because your heart doesn’t have to work as hard to pump out blood (although if you have a naturally low resting heart rate thanks to genetics, it may not get much lower, and that’s totally fine, says Lefkowith). According to the American Heart Association, the average is 60-100 BPM. You also have your maximum heart rate, which is the hardest your heart can work efficiently.
Although there is evidence of Pilates teaching standing exercises at Jacob’s Pillow,48 YouTube [Internet]. Difusión de Pilates. Joseph Pilates holistic video (1932). 2014 Dec 14 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BynuIO3smSI. [Google Scholar] he excluded standing exercises from his 34 exercise Contrology home routine, in contrast to the documented repertoires of Checkley,9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Müller,15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Randell,25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] Vaughan,47 Youtube [Internet]. Vaughan, K. Childbirth as an athletic feat (1939). 2009 Feb 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9wRBWDxReY. [Google Scholar] and Morris33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] that were dominated by standing exercises. He explained: ‘Note that all the exercises are performed while you are in a sitting or reclining position. This is done to relieve your heart from undue strain as well as to take advantage of the more normal (original) visceral organs.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar]

Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This… CONTINUE READING
I personally admit to having roller-coaster exercise habits myself. I’ll be a gym rat for three months, followed by four months of sloth and busy-ness. A few years ago, I finally realized how crappy I felt when I hadn’t exercised, and I resolved to find some way to ensure I was at least getting some exercise every day -- even when I couldn’t make it to the gym.
What is your current fitness level? – knowing where you are fitness wise may be a hard thing for some to admit, but answering yourself honestly will ensure that you don’t start off with videos you may not even be able to keep up with not to mention finish. There is nothing more discouraging than getting an exercise video and then finding out that you can’t even handle their warm up. The most important thing to keep in mind is that just because you may be starting off at the very beginner’s level, you certainly don’t have to stay there. The more you exercise the stronger you will get and the more your fitness level will increase. It didn’t take over night to end up where you’re starting from so you shouldn’t expect yourself to fix it over night as well.
The hypothalamus is under the control of several “higher” brain centres and several neurotransmitters 13 known to play a major role in various neuroendocrine and behavioural functions, for example, activation of the HPA axis, feeding and locomotion.14 Therefore, the typical HPA axisrelated hormones cortisol, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), prolactin (PRL) and human growth hormone (GH) were targeted in the present study.
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The mental benefits of barre are similar to yoga and Pilates, as it effectively increases mind-body awareness and mental clarity. Focus and concentration are required to perform the small precise movements utilized in barre. Allowing your mind to concentrate solely on your technique increases feelings of relaxation and decreases stress levels. Endorphins released during physical activity increase your general sense of well-being.

If you want to form a gym habit, it can be difficult to know what to do or how to workout. Once you become immersed in exercise, it can feel like there’s not enough time to try all the different things! Plain and simple, this is just a knowledge gap. Learning how to workout is like learning anything else, it requires time, research and study. Hiring a personal trainer is the fastest route around this, but it also helps to be a “student of the game” by continuing to educate yourself.
If you’ve ever skipped a workout because you’re just too sore from a previous one (hey, these videos are tough!), you’re definitely not alone. That’s why we love this easy-to-follow routine. It features exercises that stretch and strengthen your muscles simultaneously so you give your body the chance to recover—without skipping a workout altogether. That’s what we consider a win-win.
... The test was conducted at a self-chosen cadence between 55 and 95 revolutions per minute with an initial 5-minute warm up at 40 W followed by increments of 10 W/min (women) or 15 W/min (men) until voluntary exhaustion. Based on the expected maximal power output determined based on age, gender, disability, and body size, individual power output adjustments were made immediately after the 5-minute warm up in order to exhaust the subjects within 8 to 12 min after warm up [22]. Expired gas was collected in a mixing bag. ...

We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.


Whether you're allergic to the gym, want to save money or crave convenience, exercising at home is an easy choice to make. What's more difficult is figuring out what to do. How do you set up an effective home workout? What do you do if you don't have much equipment or space? The following series takes you through a variety of choices for exercising at home, whether you have nothing but your own body and a pair of shoes or a workout room tricked out with every piece of equipment imaginable.
The split jerk is a very powerful and fast move. HOW TO DO IT: The bar starts in the front rack position with your feet hip-width apart. Take a big breath to tighten your core, then dip straight down just a few inches to get more power. Next, drive the bar up overhead while splitting your legs into a lunge position. The goal is to get under the bar as fast as possible while driving the bar up overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.

There are many ways to do a handstand push-up. One starts in the handstand position against a wall. HOW TO DO IT: To complete this movement, lower your body to the ground so that your head touches the ground (or mat) below. Then, push yourself away from the ground into a handstand. You can also kip this so that your lower body helps drive the upper body. This can be done by bringing your knees to your chest while you lower your head toward the ground. Then, kick up to the sky as you push off of the ground with your hands. The two forces combine to bring you back to the beginning handstand position. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, core and triceps.


If your immune system is constantly fighting both its internal and external environment, it can be more challenging to live, work and exercise with the greater cognitive dysfunction, headaches, allergies, tender lymph nodes and both joint and muscle pain.  Yes, I do get it. However, I want you to be successful. Living myself with M.E, and lyme co-infections, the right approach is essential to making exercise work for us, not against us. 

1) The biggest critique I have is that transitions from poses are too aggressive and, in many cases, FAR too quick. This could very easily result in stabilizer injury with those healing from core, back, spine or neck injuries or those who don't have the best core strength to begin with. The example that comes to mind is in the 'Sweat" workout. The rapid change from low lunge into a one-foot balanced runner caused an injury for me the first week, and just again today after 6 weeks. If you have ANY history of car crash with spinal involvement, low back problems, abdominal surgery, or core weakness, you MUST listen to your body carefully during these workouts. The modifications are helpful, but they simply decrease the impact of the position once you are in them. The quick transitions in PiYO keep heart rates up, but they also jeopardize the safety of joints or muscles that are a) fatigued from participating and b) unstable due to weakness. Adapt and SLOW DOWN when needed. Better to do 2 sets safely than 4 sets and getting hurt.
The participants completed in total 69 492 exercise logs (33 608 HIIT group) during the year, of which 39 075 were received in prepaid envelopes and 30 417 in internet-based forms. Both groups performed 2.2 ± 1.3 exercise sessions per week. Almost 80% of the sessions in the MCT group were actually performed with moderate intensity (11–14 on the Borg scale), while almost 60% of the sessions in the HIIT group were performed with high intensity (≥15 on the Borg scale) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, women had a significantly higher proportion of sessions with moderate intensity compared to men (81.7% vs. 74.9%, p < 0.01). In the HIIT group, men had a higher proportion of sessions with high intensity compared to women (63.7% vs. 52.3%, p < 0.01) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, 9.6, 43 and 47.4% of the sessions had a duration of < 30 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h, respectively. The corresponding percentages in the HIIT group were 10.1, 45 and 44.9%.
The effects of exercise training appear to be heterogeneous across non-mammalian species. As examples, exercise training of salmon showed minor improvements of endurance,[155] and a forced swimming regimen of yellowtail amberjack and rainbow trout accelerated their growth rates and altered muscle morphology favorable for sustained swimming.[156][157] Crocodiles, alligators, and ducks showed elevated aerobic capacity following exercise training.[158][159][160] No effect of endurance training was found in most studies of lizards,[158][161] although one study did report a training effect.[162] In lizards, sprint training had no effect on maximal exercise capacity,[162] and muscular damage from over-training occurred following weeks of forced treadmill exercise.[161]

Multiple component community-wide campaigns are frequently used in an attempt to increase a population's level of physical activity. A 2015 Cochrane review, however, did not find evidence supporting a benefit.[122] The quality of the underlying evidence was also poor.[122] However, there is some evidence that school-based interventions can increase activity levels and fitness in children.[15] Another Cochrane review found some evidence that certain types of exercise programmes, such as those involving gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks, can improve balance in older adults.[123] Following progressive resistance training, older adults also respond with improved physical function.[124] Survey of brief interventions promoting physical activity found that they are cost-effective, although there are variations between studies.[125]
No matter where you are, you have time for 30 seconds of what Haley calls “Anywhere Push-Ups.” “This will target chest and triceps. Find a hard surface like kitchen counter or office desk. With both hands on the surface, walk away so that you’re in an elevated push-up position—the further you walk the more challenging the exercise,” she says. “Lower your body down so elbows and shoulders are at a 90-degree angle, push back up and repeat for ten reps.”

Lose yourself in the high-energy rhythm of the Pound Rockout Results System, a five-disc sweatfest in which you wield drumsticks (aka Ripstix) instead of weights. "The drumming takes your mind off your muscles hurting!" one tester marveled. You'll "constantly tap the sticks" in each routine—core, upper body, lower body, intervals, tune-up and jam session—for a "totally unique" cardio blast.
Here's how to do it with good form. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, then bend knees and flex forward at the hips. (If you have trouble doing this exercise standing up, support your weight by sitting on an incline bench, facing backward.) Tilt your pelvis slightly forward, engage the abdominals, and extend your upper spine to add support. Hold dumbbells or barbell beneath the shoulders with hands about shoulder-width apart. Flex your elbows, and lift both hands toward the sides of your body. Pause, then slowly lower hands to the starting position. (Beginners should perform the move without weights.)

Jump up ^ Int Panis, L; De Geus, Bas; Vandenbulcke, GréGory; Willems, Hanny; Degraeuwe, Bart; Bleux, Nico; Mishra, Vinit; Thomas, Isabelle; Meeusen, Romain (2010). "Exposure to particulate matter in traffic: A comparison of cyclists and car passengers". Atmospheric Environment. 44 (19): 2263–2270. Bibcode:2010AtmEn..44.2263I. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2010.04.028.


One way repeated ANOVAs (time: isotime from first to seventh minute and exhaustion) were used to test the time course of EMG RMS for all muscles, leg RPE, leg muscle pain and heart rate. Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (1st minute vs other time points, exhaustion vs other time points) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction.

I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.
But many of us made the observation that one of the best ways to objectively measure the aerobic benefits of endurance exercise was the HDL (cholesterol) level, and that these three activities usually had very little effect on HDL. We here are now following 29 patients on this high intensity (Superslow) protocol (17 minutes in the gym every 5th day), and 28 of the 29 have more than doubled their HDL's, mostly from the low 20's to the mid/high 50's. (Show this to your doctor and see if he knows of any drug or activity that can double HDL!)
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