So you think you can't dance? Now you can—and get "a good cardio workout," one reviewer said, to boot. You'll quickly love the hip-hop mix that makes up the 45-minute sesh in Groov3's Dance Sweat Live. The easy-to-learn choreography is broken down step-by-step for newbies before each sequence, "which allows you to gain confidence in your dancing as if nobody's watching" but hustles along so that "you're sweating" by the time you get into the rhythm.
Athletic trainers and physical therapists play important roles in the management of individuals with RCIS. When caring for this patient population, an athletic trainer or physical therapist performs a comprehensive initial examination. Information obtained from the examination is used, in part, to (1) identify impairments believed to be contributing to the individual's pain and functional limitations and (2) develop an impairment-based rehabilitation program. We believe that the prescription of specific evidence-based interventions designed to address the relevant contributory factors might be more appropriate than administering the same exercise program to everyone with RCIS. Ideally, individuals with RCIS would be classified into impairment-based subgroups and prescribed interventions specific to that subgroup. Although no treatment classification for patients with RCIS exists, this approach has been used to treat individuals with low back pain and has resulted in superior outcomes when compared with a general treatment approach.2
2. The "For Dummies" series. Any of the "Dummies" series videos (like Shaping up with Weights for Dummies, Pilates for Weight Loss for Dummies and Basic Yoga for Dummies) are usually excellent, says Zurowski. These videos go slowly, explain the workout clearly, and show the exercise from multiple angles. The instructor is always alone, so there are no distractions. Another good feature of this series is that it also shows mistakes to avoid, says Glenna.
If you don't have access to weights, then you can perform resistance exercises utilizing just the weight of your own body. These types of exercises include pull ups, push ups, crunches, squats, and lunges. If you'd like to find a well designed workout using body weight resistance, try the Slow Burn Fitness Revolution, which relies on slow movements to really increase intensity as you perform isotonic exercises.
Angular velocity of the pre and post isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) tests were randomized between sessions (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s). One isometric MVC of the knee flexors was also performed pre and post exercise, 20 s following completion of the last KE MVC. Post tests were performed either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s following exhaustion (P20) or 40 s following exhaustion (P40).

Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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