Exercise and physical activity fall into four basic categories—endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. Most people tend to focus on one activity or type of exercise and think they’re doing enough. Each type is different, though. Doing them all will give you more benefits. Mixing it up also helps to reduce boredom and cut your risk of injury.
If you’re sick of doing endless repetitions of traditional squats, check out this video to challenge your muscles in new ways and spark some creativity. “We asked certified personal trainer and Women’s Health’s Next Fitness Star, Selena Watkins, to pull together 15 dance-inspired versions of this classic booty toner, and the results are giving us a whole new appreciation for an old-school move,” says the magazine. This routine is just a sampler of some of the squat variations you could complete. Pick three or four and incorporate them into your next leg day to spice things up.
If the phrase "exercise videos" calls to mind Buns of Steel, purple spandex, and leg warmers, you'll be pleasantly surprised. The fitness video industry has come a long way. These days you can find anything from and dance programs to Pilates and yoga on DVD. In fact, there are so many out there that finding the best exercise videos can be a daunting proposition.
A 2015 review of clinical evidence which included a medical guideline for the treatment of depression with exercise noted that the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise therapy for depression suffers from some limitations;[53] nonetheless, it stated that there is clear evidence of efficacy for reducing symptoms of depression.[53] The review also noted that patient characteristics, the type of depressive disorder, and the nature of the exercise program all affect the antidepressant properties of exercise therapy.[53] A meta-analysis from July 2016 concluded that physical exercise improves overall quality of life in individuals with depression relative to controls.[43]
In 1912, John Shields Fairbairn, a leading consultant obstetrician at St Thomas Maternity Hospital, London, started a program to revolutionize the medical approach to child delivery.22 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004. [Google Scholar] This aimed to replace the 19th century medical practice of heavily medicating women during labor and the common use of force to deliver. To implement his vision of providing pregnant women with education and natural physical health for childbirth and recovery, Fairbairn chose Midwife and Physiotherapist Minnie Randell (1875–1974) to lead the newly founded St Thomas School of Physiotherapy, which served as the project’s education and training center.22,23 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004.
2. On Super Slow, you should be using about as much resistance as you use on a traditional strength training workout. A traditional strength training set is 10 repetitions at a speed of 2 seconds up and 2 seconds down per repetition. That's 40 seconds per working set. 2-4 Super Slow repetitions, at 10 seconds up and 10 seconds down, is 40-80 seconds, or at most twice as much time. At that pace, if you could handle 100 pounds at 10 reps of 2/2 you should be able to handle 100 pounds for 3 reps of 10/10.
Most studios offer yoga mats for your use, but you should purchase a fitness mat if working out at home. You’ll also need comfortable clothing, as you will flex your body into a variety of positions. You will most likely be barefoot, so purchasing specific footwear is not usually necessary. Other items such as straps and balls can accompany yoga routines, but they may not be necessary right away or even at all. A water bottle and towel will help you to stay hydrated and comfortable during your class. You will be bending and stretching, so it’s best to avoid heavy meals a few hours before your class.
For this basic strength-training workout, you'll do 1 set of 15 reps of each of the nine exercises listed below, resting briefly between exercises as needed. The workout targets all the muscles in the body, including the chest, shoulders, arms, back, hips, glutes, and thighs. It's short and simple—a great way for beginners to get started with strength training. 
Exercise doesn't have to be done at the gym. You can work out in the comfort of your own home. And with calesthenic-type exercises such as squats, lunges, pushups, and sit-ups, you can use the resistance of your own weight to condition your body. To boost your strength and aerobic capacity, you may also want to invest in some home exercise equipment.
You’re also extremely adaptable, so it’s a great time to explore, play, and learn new physical skills. “Younger people can handle new elements in their workouts every few weeks,” says Anderson, who trains teen athletes as well as octogenarians. Strong bones and muscles, fewer injuries, quick recovery, and naturally high levels of anabolic hormones allow you to make faster progress than at any other point in your life.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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