How would you like to get more out of your workouts? If your main goal is to burn fat, many traditional exercises and training styles may not be the best route for you. Typically when I'm at the gym and I look around I see a bunch of people doing exercises that don't really match up with their goals. If you're trying to get some bigger biceps you shouldn't be on the eliptical doing hours of cardio and conversely if you're trying to lose some weight and burn some belly fat you shouldn't be smashing out set after set of bicep curls. Exercises and training styles are like tools and before you just assume that watching one or two rocky movies is all the knowledge you need on exercising let's make sure that you've chosen the right tool for the job or I should for your goal. If your goal is to lose belly fat I hate to break it to you, but there is no exercise that can directly target the fat on your belly, but there are plenty of exercise methods that can indirectly burn the fat from your belly, and in this video I'll be going over ten of these methods....These training methods will help you burn more fat during & after your workout. Let's start with the very first one & that's peripheral heart action training. This is my favorite way to do all my weight training workouts, and I highly suggest that if you're trying to lose some belly fat you incorporate this style of training right away. In general your workouts for the week should be a mixture of some more aerobic & some more anaerobic workouts, meaning some of them will be geared more towards lifting heavy weights & others should be geared towards improving your cardiovascular function. But what you'll notice is that during your heavy weight training days, you wind up taking longer breaks & not breathing quite as heavy. Sometimes after some weight training workouts besides the soreness that you might feel in your muscles you may not feel like you worked out at all. So that's where peripheral heart action training comes into play. It helps incorporate an element of cardio into your weight training workout without you having to sacrifice the amount of weight your lifting. So you won't get weaker, but you'll be able to burn much more calories & accomplish much more in a shorter period of time. The best way to do this is by combining an upper body & a lower body movement into one set. For example you can combine a bench press with a squat. So you would do six to eight reps on the bench press & then right away with no break you would do squats for six to eight reps. You would perform both of these exercises with a heavy weight load & you would only take a break after completing both of them. With peripheral heart action training what you're doing is taking the blood that your heart would normally just have to pump to your chest & arms if you were just doing bench press by itself & what your doing is your forcing your body to pull & pump all that blood back down to your legs right after your set of bench without any break or recovery. This makes your heart work much harder allowing you to get your heart rate & breathing rate higher & this will burn more calories & fat in the process. Now let's say that you don't want to work legs & upper body in the same day you want to focus on each on separate days. Well the good news is that peripheral heart action training doesn't only work only if you combine an upper & a lower body movement. It'll also work if you combine two movements that work opposing muscle groups. For example if you combine chest & back movements together with no break. Or if you do quad & hamstring movements together with no break your heart will still have to work much harder to push the blood from the anterior part of your body to the posterior part of your body. So peripheral heart action training try it out. The second exercise style that can help you burn a lot more belly fat is known as cardio acceleration training. We actually have a whole hour long class at our gyms dedicated to this type of training because it's so effective. Once again it involves super setting two exercises. Except this time instead of doing two weight training exercises back to back we're combining a weight training exercise with a cardio exercise with no break. So an example of this would be to perform a set of barbell squats with heavy weight for let's say six to ten reps & then immediately with no break once you rack the bar you go right into high knees for thirty to forty five seconds. Then take a break & repeat for three to four sets
Absolute values for KE MVC torques and maximal EMG RMS are presented Table 3. As EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 60 deg/s pre-exercise values significantly differ between sessions, these data were not analyzed. Planned comparisons to explore main effect of time are presented Table 3. Despite a significant main effect of time for the EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 140 deg/s, planned comparison failed to demonstrate a significant difference between times. Changes in KE MVC torque and KE EMG RMS related to baseline are presented Figs 6 and 7. Isometric KF MVC torque did not change over time (75 ± 31 to 73 ± 27 N·m, P = 0.368).

In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.


The recent “consensus statement” of the European College of Sport Science indicates that the difference between NFO and OTS is the amount of time needed for performance restoration and not the type or duration of training stress or degree of impairment.1 In essence, it is generally thought that symptoms of OTS, such as fatigue, performance decline and mood disturbances, are more severe than those of NFO. However, there is no scientific evidence to either confirm or refute this suggestion.1 The distinction between NFO and OTS is most of the time based on “time to recover”. Hence, there is a need for objective, immediately available evidence that the athlete is indeed experiencing OTS.
C. Philip Gabel is the founder and principal physiotherapist at Coolum Physiotherapy, Queensland Australia. His research interests are rehabilitation and exercise, slacklining, laser therapy, and outcome measures. His publications are Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, and validity of the Spanish version of the lower limb functional index. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2014; Analysis of arm elevation muscle activity through different movement planes and speeds during in-water and dry-land exercise. Journal of Shoulder Elbow Surgery 2014.

Exclusion criteria included major diseases or conditions such as severe heart disease, uncontrolled hypertension, obesity, osteoarticular pathology, and neurological disease. Criteria were evaluated on the basis of clinical history, resting ECG, and physical examination. Participants maintained their lifestyles and were instructed not to take part in any other physical programs throughout the study. At the time of the initial design, the study consisted of a 12-week randomized controlled trial with a frequency of 3 times a week, 36 sessions in all, ending with a new assessment of their wellness and the potential persistence of the results on functional/physical capacities.
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