An evidence-based journal club of 9 faculty members and fellows reviewed the articles and extracted and tabulated the data. Individual outcomes for pain, range of motion (ROM), strength, and function were organized. Intragroup and between-groups outcomes were assessed for the effectiveness of treatment, and statistical outcomes were recorded when available. Clinical importance was determined when statistical value was P < .05 and the effect size or difference between treatments was 20% or more. Sixa major categories were created to organize the components of the physical therapy programs used in each study: ROM, flexibility and stretching, strengthening techniques, therapist-driven manual therapy, modalities, and schedule. Components from these categories were used to create a synthesized physical therapy program.

The exercises developed by Checkley, Müller, Randell, Alexander, Pilates, and Morris were secular in nature. The holistic unity between harmonious movements and beauty, health, performance and youth, between the body and mind, and between human and nature were all emphasized yet these universal concepts were unimpeded by religious, political, or commercial influences. The exercises were simply harmonious functional human movements learned from observations of nature.
Begin this starter sit-up with your legs straight in front of you. Extend your arms over your legs and lower your head between your arms. Curl backward, bending your knees, and stop halfway down. Raise your arms straight up and pull your abs in tightly. Exhale and lower your arms as you curl back up. Do 6-8 reps at a moderate pace. As you become more advanced, try lowering all the way to the floor.
This reformer exercise is an efficient way to work the entire lower body.  Kneel on the reformer and round the back, keeping the arms straight. Use the butt muscles and thighs to push and pull your lower body back and forth. The platform will slide a few inches with each movement. Do five reps. As you get more advanced, do another five reps with the back arched.
As you strengthen your abs, it's vital to tone the back of the body as well. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet hip-width apart. Keep your arms at your sides and raise your hips without arching your back. Tighten the muscles of your buttocks and hamstrings, and hold for five breaths. Lower down one vertebra at a time to the floor if you're stopping here, or go on to the advanced posture.

Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.


We were looking for something a bit more 'sophisticated' than the brightly colored tiles for our living room area where the kids play and we entertain. They are good quality, and because they are reversible, we were able to design more of a 'rug' look, rather thana being stuck with the regular checkerboard pattern with std tiles. These are a great value!
Or should I say Chalene JAMS! This is a really fun program. I admit I felt kind of foolish and uncoordinated at first, but now that I know the moves I get in there and sweat up a storm! I like that there are low impact modifications for those of us with back or knee issues that preclude a whole lotta jumping around. I haven't lost any weight doing the program (probably more hormonal and metabolic roadblocks than lack of trying) but I feel better when I do it, so I am not disappointed one bit.
What is your current fitness level? – knowing where you are fitness wise may be a hard thing for some to admit, but answering yourself honestly will ensure that you don’t start off with videos you may not even be able to keep up with not to mention finish. There is nothing more discouraging than getting an exercise video and then finding out that you can’t even handle their warm up. The most important thing to keep in mind is that just because you may be starting off at the very beginner’s level, you certainly don’t have to stay there. The more you exercise the stronger you will get and the more your fitness level will increase. It didn’t take over night to end up where you’re starting from so you shouldn’t expect yourself to fix it over night as well.
Toning the upper back is the fast track to better posture. This move uses the reformer with an accessory called a long box. Lie on your stomach with your chest just past the edge of the long box. Grab the straps in front of you with straight arms. Lift the head and chest as you pull the straps down toward your hips. The long box will slide forward, with you on top. Release the arms back to the starting position. Do five reps.
Okay, this one if for the kids, but grown-ups can do it to too. With animated instructions, catchy music, and all the basics of the other full-body workouts, this is another top choice overall. The exercises include some more advanced moves, like tricep dips with a chair and push-ups with rotation, so it’s a great one to do with your kids.                                    
17.  If you're getting a normal amount of usable protein (about one gram per five pounds of body weight), your body will require a bit more protein than usual as you increase lean muscle tissue). Uncooked protein is preferable to cooked protein (cooking denatures proteins, damaging them, and making them appear as a foreign invader to the body which can trigger an autoimmune response). A good source of protein is fruits, vegetables, and nuts. (Yes, nuts have fat too, but it's "good" fat, and your body needs fat in your diet; you can have a lean body while eating the right kinds of fat!) Give your body the additional protein as it asks for it. Listen carefully, and you'll know when. Remember, it's very difficult to get too little protein; most people get way too much, and too much protein is a cause of degenerative disease. (See Fact or Fiction: High protein diets are great for losing weight)

Park further away. I know a lot of us have developed the (bad) habit of trying to get the parking spot absolutely closest to our destination—I know this because I have both cut-off and been cut-off by some aggressive drivers who really wanted to park 50 feet closer—but this is dumb. Spare yourself the road rage and do your body a favor by parking further away and getting in some extra walking.
In healthy adults, aerobic exercise has been shown to induce transient effects on cognition after a single exercise session and persistent effects on cognition following regular exercise over the course of several months.[33][42][45] People who regularly perform aerobic exercise (e.g., running, jogging, brisk walking, swimming, and cycling) have greater scores on neuropsychological function and performance tests that measure certain cognitive functions, such as attentional control, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, working memory updating and capacity, declarative memory, spatial memory, and information processing speed.[33][37][39][41][42][45] The transient effects of exercise on cognition include improvements in most executive functions (e.g., attention, working memory, cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control, problem solving, and decision making) and information processing speed for a period of up to 2 hours after exercising.[45]
Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.

It’s no secret that Beyoncé is a crazy-good performer, and while we could never mimic her vocals, with some coaching, we thought we could pick up her dance moves. That’s why we were so excited to discover this video series featuring choreographer Frank Gatson, Jr., who breaks down every portion of Beyoncé’s Let’s Move! campaign, which features a remix of “Get Me Bodied.” Watch the first instructional portion and then the second one to learn the entire routine.
Start by lying on your back with your feet flat on the floor and your head resting in the palm of one hand and the other hand reaching toward your knees. Press your lower back down. Contract your abdominal muscles (abs) and in one smooth move, raise your head, then your neck, shoulders, and upper back off the floor. Tuck in your chin slightly. Lower back down and repeat.
Jumping is the purest form of explosiveness. In this move, the athlete starts from the ground and jumps onto a box of a certain height – start with a lower height box and build your way up. HOW TO DO IT: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart, and drop down to a quarter squat. Then, drive your arms up as they explode out of the quarter squat and onto the box. Once your feet land on the top of the box, you open your hips and stand up. To repeat, you can “plyo” the jump by rebounding immediately off of the ground. An alternate way of completing repeated box jumps is to step down off of the box before jumping back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves.
One of the beautiful things about yoga is that you can do it anywhere, anytime. (Even in the middle of a desert, as this video proves.) But sometimes you need some instruction to get through an entire sequence. That’s where Tara Stiles comes in. The New York City-based yogi teaches a full flow class in this excellent 50-minute video (one of the best YouTube workouts, in our opinion). Her detailed, easy-to-follow instructions make it seem as though you’re working one-on-one with her, and by the end of it, you’ve had a super solid yoga experience.
The other important part? It has to be tough — 85% or more exertion for 30-seconds to one minute, followed by a 10-second rest. Or, as Heather Tyler, an NSCA-certified personal trainer and owner of Simply Fit LA wrote to me in an email, “you know that feeling like you’ve run up five flights of stairs, your heart’s pounding in your ears, you’re dripping sweat and you sound like a donkey wheezing?”
Jumping and throwing moves, punches, kicks, and swinging a club or a racket all require power, which comes from your core—and, yes, causes those ab muscles to cinch. "The core is the crossroads of your system, helping transfer force between your upper and lower body," says Rick Richey, a faculty member for the National Academy of Sports Medicine in New York City. Add medicine ball throws to your sets: A study in the Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research found they are ideal core strengtheners. (Don't just stop at tossing, medicine balls can be used for a full body workout.)
Toning the upper back is the fast track to better posture. This move uses the reformer with an accessory called a long box. Lie on your stomach with your chest just past the edge of the long box. Grab the straps in front of you with straight arms. Lift the head and chest as you pull the straps down toward your hips. The long box will slide forward, with you on top. Release the arms back to the starting position. Do five reps.
Continuous aerobic exercise can induce a transient state of euphoria, colloquially known as a "runner's high" in distance running or a "rower's high" in crew, through the increased biosynthesis of at least three euphoriant neurochemicals: anandamide (an endocannabinoid),[73] β-endorphin (an endogenous opioid),[74] and phenethylamine (a trace amine and amphetamine analog).[75][76][77]
In 1918 following WWI, Pilates returned to Germany where he started training dancers and quickly gained acclaim. However, to avoid Contrology being used by the German army, Pilates moved to the USA in 1925 and opened the Pilates Universal Studio in Manhattan.39,42 Balanced Body, Inc. [Internet]. Origins of Pilates. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/pilates/origins-of-pilates.html.

Endurance performance (i.e. exercise duration > 1 min) is extensively studied in exercise physiology using cycling and/or running exercise (e.g. [1–4]). Despite being close to real competition events by involving the whole-body, the use of cycling and/or running exercise presents some important limitations to understand the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance. Indeed, as whole-body exercise involves greater systemic responses than isolated exercise [5], it is difficult to interpret some specific experimental manipulations aiming to understand CNS processes regulating muscle fatigue and endurance performance (e.g. manipulation of III-IV muscle afferents [6, 7]). Furthermore, due to the need to transfer the participant from the treadmill/bicycle to the ergometer, the true extent of muscle fatigue at exhaustion is underestimated [8], leading to inconclusive results on how peripheral (i.e. fatigue produced by changes at or distal to the neuromuscular junction [9]) and central (i.e. decrease in maximal voluntary activation level [9]) components of muscle fatigue might interact between each other’s (for review see [2, 9]). Therefore, due to the aforementioned limitations, the development of a new exercise model is required to better investigate the CNS processes regulating endurance performance.


Making the commitment to start an exercise program is an exciting first step in improving your life through increased physical and mental health. After all, what better investment can you make than in yourself? If you’ve struggled with not having enough time, money, energy or motivation to work out, push them aside and remember that you’re worth it. No excuses!
The findings indicated that exercise improves outcomes of pain, strength, ROM impairments, and function in patients with impingement syndrome. In 10 studies, investigators reported improvements in pain with supervised exercise, home exercise, exercise associated with manual therapy, and exercise after subacromial decompression. Of the 6 studies in which researchers compared pre-exercise pain with postexercise pain, 5 demonstrated that exercise produced statistically significant and clinically important reductions in pain. Two studies demonstrated improvements in pain when comparing exercise and control groups. In 1 study, investigators evaluated bracing without exercise and found no difference in pain between the brace and exercise groups. Investigators evaluated exercise combined with manual therapy in 3 studies and demonstrated improvement in pain relief in each study and improvement in strength in 1 study. In most studies, exercise also was shown to improve function. The improvement in function was statistically significant in 4 studies and clinically meaningful in 2 of these studies. In 2 studies, researchers compared supervised exercise with a home exercise program and found that function improved in both groups but was not different between groups. This finding might have resulted from a type II statistical error. In 4 studies, researchers did not find differences between acromioplasty with exercise and exercise alone for pain alone or for outcomes of pain and function.
Checkley, Müller, Alexander, and Pilates initiated their interests from a self-requirement to improve health or overcome functional loss. They subsequently used their bodies as a model to demonstrate their method’s effectiveness and encourage others. Despite their turn of the 20th century separation from the gymnasium ‘Physical Culture’ and new independence, all six MMB pioneers advocated their exercises as an adjunct to other sports and regular daily activity; Müller recommended running on the balls of the feet as an aerobic activity, Pilates worked with dancers, while Morris, who besides her dedication to dance and dancers’ health also published ‘Tennis by Simple Exercises’ in 1937 together with French tennis mega-star Suzanne Lenglen.60 Lenglen S, Morris M. Tennis by simple exercises. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar]
“I always tell people that you want to learn why you’re doing something—knowing a bunch of moves doesn’t matter as much when don’t you know how to implement them,” explains Cori Lefkowith, Orange County-based personal trainer and founder of Redefining Strength. So even if you’ve got planks and push-ups down, understanding what’s really going on while you’re training can help you reach your goals faster. We’ve decoded 25 common fitness terms for you so that you can work out with confidence and get the most out of your fitness routine.

* Strength building exercises will improve cardiopulmonary efficiency. The cardiopulmonary system exists to service the musculature (among other things). You "get at" the cardiopulmonary system through the skeletal muscles. When demands are made of the musculature which strengthen it, all systems that service the musculature will be strengthened accordingly. The cardiopulmonary system doesn't care what exercise you do. (However, the joints, ligaments, and tendons do; and while they don't mind the occasional sprint, they'd rather you not pound them with high-force activities for hours-on-end.) If the exercise protocol outlined above results in excellent cardiopulmonary fitness, why would you want to do more than you need to do? (And there are studies which suggest that doing more than you need is actually harmful to the heart!)

The first step to any workout routine is to evaluate how fit you are for your chosen physical activity. Whenever you begin an exercise program, it's wise to consult a doctor. Anyone with major health risks, males aged 45 and older, and women aged 55 and older should get medical clearance, says Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief exercise physiologist for the American Council on Exercise.


The main strength of this study is the large data material on exercise patterns. Most research on exercise pattern has used a cross-sectional design whereas we followed older adults over a one-year period and collected data from each exercise session they performed. Furthermore, this is the first study to assess differences in exercise patterns between older adults instructed to follow MCT versus HIIT.
A typical yoga class involves different types of breathing and stretching exercises. You will need a yoga mat on which you will spend the majority of your workout. A series of warm up exercises involving breathing and stretching usually begins the class. From there, you will engage in a variety of yoga positions designed to stretch and work your muscles. This involves holding your body in challenging poses designed to work a variety of muscle groups at the same time. A cool-down period with breathing exercises will end your session.
Hessel J [Internet]. Joseph H. Pilates biography. 2015 Jul 8 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.jillianhessel.com/pilates_biography.html.  He claimed that ‘sports are wonderful … but of little value for correcting whats wrong with you … corrective exercise is the only way to build a beautiful, strong, youthful body.’44 Readers Digest [Internet]. Ray MB. Cutting a fine figure (1934). 2012 Dec 13 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.isofit.com.hk/assets/files/193410_Readers_Digest_Joe_Pilates_Interview.pdf. [Google Scholar] He explained in his 1939 book ‘Your Health’: ‘Practically all human ailments are directly traceable to wrong habits which can only be corrected through the immediate adoption of right (natural, normal) habits’ … ‘the present day efforts of our so-called health departments are in vain so far as physical health is concerned’ … ‘this condition will prevail until such time as marks the recognition of a standard formation of sound and sane physical culture, based upon the natural laws of life.’45 Pilates J. Your health. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1934. [Google Scholar] In his 1945 book ‘Return to Life Through Contrology,’ Pilates clearly supported Checkley, Müller, and Alexander stating that ‘Contrology is not a system of haphazard exercises designed to produce only bulging muscles’ … ‘Rather, it was conceived to limber and stretch muscles and ligaments so that your body will be as supple as that of a cat and not muscular like the body of a brewery-truck horse.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar] In this book, Pilates presented a list of 34 full-body equipment-free exercises, which if performed regularly at home, were promised to ‘give you suppleness, natural grace, and skill that will be unmistakably reflected in the way you walk, in the way you play, and in the way you work’ … ‘You will find your body development approaching the ideal, accompanied by renewed mental vigor and spiritual enhancement’. Pilates famously stated: ‘Physical fitness is the first requisite of happiness.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar] As with Müller,15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Randell,25,26 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949.

Lisa Avellino, Fitness Director at NY Health and Wellness, says to grab a kitchen towel and engage in just 30 seconds of isometric motion with it. “Thirty seconds of opposing pull—like a human tug-a-war—will take any muscle to its maximum potential because you use your own bodyweight as resistance,” she explains. “The best part is that the stronger you are the more challenging the workout is, so you can never surpass maximum potential.” Speaking of the kitchen, check out these 25 Ways to Organize Your Kitchen for Weight Loss!
Results Maximal blood lactate concentration was lower in OTS compared with NFO, while resting concentrations of cortisol, ACTH and prolactin concentrations were higher. However, sensitivity of these measures was low. The ACTH and prolactin reactions to the second exercise bout were much higher in NFO athletes compared with OTS and showed the highest sensitivity for making the distinction.
^ Jump up to: a b Szuhany KL, Bugatti M, Otto MW (October 2014). "A meta-analytic review of the effects of exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor". J Psychiatr Res. 60C: 56–64. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.10.003. PMC 4314337. PMID 25455510. Consistent evidence indicates that exercise improves cognition and mood, with preliminary evidence suggesting that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may mediate these effects. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to provide an estimate of the strength of the association between exercise and increased BDNF levels in humans across multiple exercise paradigms. We conducted a meta-analysis of 29 studies (N = 1111 participants) examining the effect of exercise on BDNF levels in three exercise paradigms: (1) a single session of exercise, (2) a session of exercise following a program of regular exercise, and (3) resting BDNF levels following a program of regular exercise. Moderators of this effect were also examined. Results demonstrated a moderate effect size for increases in BDNF following a single session of exercise (Hedges' g = 0.46, p < 0.001). Further, regular exercise intensified the effect of a session of exercise on BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.59, p = 0.02). Finally, results indicated a small effect of regular exercise on resting BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.27, p = 0.005). ... Effect size analysis supports the role of exercise as a strategy for enhancing BDNF activity in humans.

Matt Sauerhoff, owner of The LIV Method says one of his favorite, fastest and easiest to do on the go moves is the wall squat. “Start with your back against the wall and your heels about a foot off the wall. Bend your knees and slide down the wall until your legs create a 90-degree angle,” he says. “Make sure your knees are aligned over your toes/laces. Press heels into the floor and focus on contracting your abs, pressing lower back into the wall so it’s flat. Hold for 30 seconds.” Combine it with these 30 Fat-Burning Foods and you’ll be melting the fat in no time!

^ Jump up to: a b Wilkinson DJ, Hossain T, Limb MC, Phillips BE, Lund J, Williams JP, Brook MS, Cegielski J, Philp A, Ashcroft S, Rathmacher JA, Szewczyk NJ, Smith K, Atherton PJ (October 2017). "Impact of the calcium form of β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate upon human skeletal muscle protein metabolism". Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland). doi:10.1016/j.clnu.2017.09.024. PMID 29097038. Ca-HMB led a significant and rapid (<60 min) peak in plasma HMB concentrations (483.6 ± 14.2 μM, p < 0.0001). This rise in plasma HMB was accompanied by increases in MPS (PA: 0.046 ± 0.004%/h, CaHMB: 0.072 ± 0.004%/h, p < [0.001]) and suppressions in MPB (PA: 7.6 ± 1.2 μmol Phe per leg min−1, Ca-HMB: 5.2 ± 0.8 μmol Phe per leg min−1, p < 0.01). ... During the first 2.5 h period we gathered postabsorptive/fasted measurements, the volunteers then consumed 3.42 g of Ca-HMB (equivalent to 2.74 g of FA-HMB) ... It may seem difficult for one to reconcile that acute provision of CaHMB, in the absence of exogenous nutrition (i.e. EAA's) and following an overnight fast, is still able to elicit a robust, perhaps near maximal stimulation of MPS, i.e. raising the question as to where the additional AA's substrates required for supporting this MPS response are coming from. It would appear that the AA's to support this response are derived from endogenous intracellular/plasma pools and/or protein breakdown (which will increase in fasted periods). ... To conclude, a large single oral dose (~3 g) of Ca-HMB robustly (near maximally) stimulates skeletal muscle anabolism, in the absence of additional nutrient intake; the anabolic effects of Ca-HMB are equivalent to FA-HMB, despite purported differences in bioavailability (Fig. 4).

A Polar (www.polar.fi) heart rate monitor (belt and watch) is used to measure heart rate continuously. A transmitter belt is fastened around the chest while the watch is held by a nearby observer. If at any time during the experiment the heart rate exceeds the predetermined ceiling (85% of age-predicted max heart rate) the experiment should be stopped immediately.

Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.3 Perspectives for Progress “Physical Activity as Cause and Cure of Muscular Pain: Evidence of Underlying Mechanisms” from authors Karen Søgaard and Gisela Sjøgaard. Work-related physical activity (PA), in terms of peak loads and sustained and/or repetitive contractions, presents risk factors for the development of muscular pain and disorders. However, PA as a training tailored to the employee’s work exposure, health, and physical capacity offers prevention and rehabilitation. We suggest the concept of “Intelligent Physical Exercise Training” relying on evidence-based sports science training principles.
Results Maximal blood lactate concentration was lower in OTS compared with NFO, while resting concentrations of cortisol, ACTH and prolactin concentrations were higher. However, sensitivity of these measures was low. The ACTH and prolactin reactions to the second exercise bout were much higher in NFO athletes compared with OTS and showed the highest sensitivity for making the distinction.
The deadlift is one of the foundational strength movements in any exercise program. HOW TO DO IT: The deadlift begins with the bar on the ground. You can perform this with a regular grip or an alternating grip, which means one hand facing towards your body and one hand facing away. With a proud chest and locked core, pull the bar up while keeping it as close to your body as possible. Use your hip hinge and push your knees back to keep your body over the bar. Then extend the hips and squeeze the glutes to complete the move. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, back and core.
No matter where you are, you have time for 30 seconds of what Haley calls “Anywhere Push-Ups.” “This will target chest and triceps. Find a hard surface like kitchen counter or office desk. With both hands on the surface, walk away so that you’re in an elevated push-up position—the further you walk the more challenging the exercise,” she says. “Lower your body down so elbows and shoulders are at a 90-degree angle, push back up and repeat for ten reps.”
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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