The deadlift is one of the foundational strength movements in any exercise program. HOW TO DO IT: The deadlift begins with the bar on the ground. You can perform this with a regular grip or an alternating grip, which means one hand facing towards your body and one hand facing away. With a proud chest and locked core, pull the bar up while keeping it as close to your body as possible. Use your hip hinge and push your knees back to keep your body over the bar. Then extend the hips and squeeze the glutes to complete the move. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, back and core.
Lisa Avellino, Fitness Director at NY Health and Wellness, says to grab a kitchen towel and engage in just 30 seconds of isometric motion with it. “Thirty seconds of opposing pull—like a human tug-a-war—will take any muscle to its maximum potential because you use your own bodyweight as resistance,” she explains. “The best part is that the stronger you are the more challenging the workout is, so you can never surpass maximum potential.” Speaking of the kitchen, check out these 25 Ways to Organize Your Kitchen for Weight Loss!
The two 20-minute high-energy kickboxing routines combined with other cardio moves eliminate boredom in this program. When I felt particularly ambitious, I did both together for one calorie-blasting 40-minute workout; I chose one or the other when I only had 20 minutes to spare in the morning. Make sure to do this in a spacious room, because the amount of kicking, punching and movement, as I unfortunately discovered, is not tailored to tiny spaces.

Alert: Companies strictly follow their exercise rules and deadlines, and courts tend to side with them. See, for example, Deal v. Consumer Programs, Inc. (2006), decided by the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals. The court ruled that the mere submission of a written notice to exercise stock options may be insufficient when the grant agreement states that the notice must be "accompanied by full payment of the purchase price of the shares."
My husband ordered this program several months ago and I was, of course, skeptical. But, being sick of our current workout programs and seeing as it was only going to take 4 minutes, what did I have to lose? We tried it...and we LOVE it. There is about a 2 min warm-up routine you are supposed to do before each workout, then a rotating schedule of 4-min, muscle tiring, heart pumping workouts. You wouldn't think that 4 minutes could really do anything, but time has proven otherwise. After only a couple months of doing the workouts as a family, we are seeing great results. I've got a nice set of pipes, my stomach is flatter and I'm up to a 4-pack...hoping I'll get to that 6-pack before the end of the year, my rear, legs and waistline are trimmer and more firm. My ... full review

During your workout you have “target” heart rate zones that are expressed as a percentage of your max heart rate. For low-intensity cardio, you want to aim for 60 to 70 percent of your max heart rate, for moderate-intensity cardio the goal is 70 to 85 percent, and for high-intensity cardio, 85 percent or above. This can help you see if you’re really working as hard as you think you are and adjust as needed to make sure you’re hitting your workout goals. Here’s how to calculate your max and target heart rate zones.
SOURCES: Liz Neporent, video creator; president, Wellness 360 corporate wellness consulting firm, New York. Wendy Glenna, American Council on Exercise-certified fitness instructor; physical education teacher; fitness video reviewer, Collage Video, Minneapolis, Minn. Paula Zurowski, ACE-certified personal trainer; fitness video reviewer, Richmond, Calif.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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