There’s a simple way to get your body back in fat-blasting mode: Temporarily ditch your go-to moves. "When you change up your workout, your body works harder because it’s in unfamiliar territory," explains Amy Dixon, a Santa Monica, California–based trainer and exercise physiologist. "That’s what causes it to burn more calories and build more muscle."

To measure exercise type the participants were instructed to choose from the following response options: walking, jogging, cycling, dancing, cross-country skiing, swimming, golf, resistance training and an open-ended response option. Answers in the open-ended response option were categorized into: combined endurance and resistance training, other type of endurance training (e.g. treadmill, aerobic), domestic activities (e.g. housework, gardening), and other (e.g. bowling, horseback riding). Golf was categorized as “other” due to a low response rate (0.5% of the total number of exercise sessions).

The severity of angina and the effects of therapeutic interventions in patients with coronary artery disease have been assessed by determining changes in both exercise performance and the triple product (TP) of heart rate, systolic pressure, and ejection time occurring at angina. However, the validity of conclusions based on such changes is uncertain since the effects of different exercise protocols on these variables have not been determined. Twelve patients with angina were studied during upright bicycle exercise; repeated bouts of exercise using a standard protocol of 20-w increments every three minutes produced no consistent changes in TP at angina. When exercise began 20 to 60 w above the work load of the standard protocol that produced angina, exercise capacity was reduced (average 1'40'' vs. 4'40'', P < 0.001), and triple product at angina exceeded control anginal values (average 4,840 vs. 4,150, P < 0.001). In the control studies nitroglycerin (TNG) and carotid sinus nerve stimulation (CSNS) enabled patients to exercise to a higher level, although the triple product at angina was unaltered. However, at the higher work load TNG and CSNS exerted only minimal effects on exercise capacity, indicating that if the work load is excessive, a reduction in myocardial oxygen consumption produced by a therapeutic intervention may be comparatively minor so that a potentially salutary effect would be masked. We conclude that work loads causing angina in less than three minutes cannot reliably be used for studying the effects of therapy. However, if progressive work loads are chosen which cause angina in the control studies in three to six minutes, exercise capacity and triple product at angina provide important information about the efficacy and mechanism of action of a therapeutic intervention.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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